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Klassiek - Verschenen op 2 juni 2008 | Warner Classics

Booklet Onderscheidingen Choc du Monde de la Musique
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 29 april 2008 | Naxos

Booklet Onderscheidingen 9 de Classica-Répertoire
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 15 juni 2016 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 18 december 2020 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Symfonieën - Verschenen op 30 juli 2021 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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The Mahlerian tradition of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra is not very old, neither Furtwängler nor Karajan conducted much of Gustav Mahler's music. The famous Berlin phalanx has since made up for it under its later artistic directors, starting with Claudio Abbado, whose exceptional performances in Berlin and Lucerne are well remembered. This new direction has just been confirmed with the release of a splendid box set on the Berliner Philharmoniker's own label. It presents Mahler's ten Symphonies in versions recorded over the last ten years under today's finest batons: Daniel Harding, Andris Nelsons, Gustavo Dudamel, Kirill Petrenko, Sir Simon Rattle, Bernard Haitink and, of course Claudio Abbado who is chosen for the Adagio from Symphony N° 10.The last individual publication is the pastoral Fourth conducted by Yannick Nézet-Seguin, a musician adored as much by the Berlin musicians as by all the orchestras he conducts. It has to be said that the Québecois has a very rare, capital sympathy and charisma, not to mention his exceptional musical sense. His vision mixes supreme lyricism with an elegance at every moment, in a majestic art that succeeds in reconciling extremes with a great modesty, until the final explosion of the wonderful Ruhevoll. Then the final Lied bursts out, a true hymn to nature or a slightly ironic evocation of a vision of a paradise that is more earthly than it seems, sung with naive wonder by the soprano Christine Karg.This is a superb new recording that enriches the abundant discography of this happy symphony, so different from its nine sisters. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 23 oktober 2020 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 30 april 2021 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Among the ten Mahler symphonies via eight conductors that the Berlin Philharmonic has released this year on its own label – captured at various points over the past decade – their 2017 account of No. 9 with Bernard Haitink is undoubtedly one of its highlights. No wonder, perhaps, when Haitink has been known for his Mahler ever since he contributed to his home country's Mahler renaissance from the early 1960s, as Chief Conductor of the Amsterdam Concertgebouw. Back to the Berliners, with whom his relationship is equally a longstanding and close one, and you know you're in for a treat right from the off: lucid textures filling the Philharmonie's warmly analytical space; endless long lines; the sheen and polish of the strings, first appearing meltingly soft before graduating to a searing luminosity, matched by equally searing, burnished brass; climaxes for which “searing” is again the word, turning on a pin from radiant to shattering, and delivered with a devastating intensity and forwards propulsion; the simple dignity of the first violin's solo at the recapitulation, all the more affecting for its emotional restraint. From the central two movements there's then a constantly shifting blend of elegance and rustic edge, intimate in pointe chamber playing and hard-voiced tutti power, and multi-shaded humour and hysteria. The woodwind's town band impressions are on the sophisticated end of the scale, but that's no bad thing, and the glossy acidic bite and semi-hysteria the strings bring to their second movement downwards slides is delicious. Perhaps the third movement's final explosion could be more satisfyingly cataclysmic if it were a shade darker and heavier, but the final movement's gradual relinquishing of life is all you could hope for in its soft-voiced intensity – you're hanging off not just their every note, but also the weighted silence of the Philharmonie itself. Indeed, when it's possible to feel taken on such a spellbinding journey from the humdrum surroundings of one's own home, sitting in the hall with them must have been unforgettable. © Charlotte Gardner/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 25 oktober 2010 | Warner Classics

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Simon Rattle recorded Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky's festive ballet the Nutcracker in 2009 with the Berlin Philharmonic, and this double-disc package is a first-rate presentation of the beloved holiday favorite. Rattle's approach is warm and inviting, and the music is played with brilliant flair and playful buoyancy. A late-comer to appreciating other works by Tchaikovsky, Rattle claims he always had a special affection for the ballets, and found the Nutcracker especially interesting when he learned of its influence on Igor Stravinsky's Petrushka. This is not to say that Rattle conducts this work in a revisionist or ironic manner, à la Stravinsky, for there is a richness here that is pure Tchaikovsky. Yet a case could be made that Rattle interprets the work with little sentimentality and with an ear for the piquant, and in that manner makes a connection between the two great Russian composers. The Berlin Philharmonic is exceptional in its radiant colors, full textures, and cohesive playing, and the Nutcracker is a delight with such a superb ensemble. EMI's reproduction is also deserving of praise, for the digital sound is as close to state-of-the-art as possible in a regular CD format, and the audio range is wide and deep, with every note easy to hear. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 26 maart 2021 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Symfonieën - Verschenen op 28 mei 2021 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 27 november 2020 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 16 januari 2021 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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Symfonieën - Verschenen op 25 juni 2021 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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In a volcanic outburst of creativity, the 27-year-old Gustav Mahler wrote his First Symphony within just a few weeks. He then struggled significantly longer to find a definitive shape for this unprecedentedly novel work, which shook the musical public like an earthquake and divided heated tempers into Mahler lovers and Mahler loathers. No one was left cold by the overpowering sound of this work he initially entitled Titan (after Jean Paul’s novel). It begins as a quivering surface (“Wie ein Naturlaut” – “Like a sound of nature”) out of which motivic ideas emerge – fanfare and birdcall fragments from near and far, including an obstinate cuckoo – until a melody is articulated, derived from the Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen (Songs of a Wayfarer), where it is sung to the words “Ging heut Morgen übers Feld…Wird’s nicht eine schöne Welt?” (“This morning I went across the fields…Isn’t the world looking lovely?”). In programmatic indications that he later withdrew, Mahler describes the movement as “the awakening of Nature after a long winter’s sleep”. The earthy ländler-scherzo is followed by a whimsical funeral-march parody based on a minor-mode version of the folksong canon Bruder Jakob (Frère Jacques). Naïve humour and obscure tragedy clash very much as in Jean Paul’s writings. The “horrifying outcry” that launches the finale definitively exposes the “lovely world’s” ambiguity. The violence of this last movement tears open a roaring abyss. According to Mahler, in the tumultuous masses of sound the “hero” – is it the composer himself? – is locked in a terrible battle “with all the sorrows of this world”. Then, almost imperceptibly, out of a reminiscence of the shimmering sounds of nature that began the symphony, a “victory chorale” takes shape and, with the mobilization of all forces, is elevated into a gigantic apotheosis. Mahler’s First: a hero’s life – or indeed a commedia humana? © 2020 Berlin Phil Media GmbH
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 3 november 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 10 november 2017 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 23 oktober 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)