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Alternative & Indie - To be released February 4, 2022 | Mexican Summer

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 17, 2021 | Mexican Summer

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Soul - Released November 15, 2021 | Mexican Summer

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 7, 2021 | Mexican Summer

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On their fifth album, Iceage continue their metamorphosis into poetic harbingers with a flair for the theatrical, leaving their scrappy beginnings firmly behind for better or worse. As always, there is a sense of urgency to the record, with the group even veering into Brit-pop bombast, like Oasis reimagined for red wine-guzzling literary fanatics. Elias Bender Rønnenfelt's signature drawl only further positions him as a prophet of sleaze, and the band remain as capable as ever, but it's hard to escape the feeling their rougher edges have been refined, as some tracks glide by a little too smoothly to become the kind of earworms they have crafted in the past. Something that decidedly hasn't changed is their propensity for explosive openers, like "Shelter Song" and its massive chorus that manages to hit like a truck; even at midtempo, the Wall of Sound and soaring backing vocals are staggering. Despite a brief change of pace in the beautified "Love Kills Slowly," the energy travels right through to centerpiece "Vendetta." The track is all swagger -- it comes out swinging like something in between Happy Mondays and Kasabian, running the risk of becoming stadium-built lad rock, and only avoids such damning praise by virtue of Rønnenfelt's natural attitude. It is followed by a strange left turn in "Drink Rain," which channels Jacques Brel, and as admirable an influence as he may be, the song just doesn't land correctly, serving only as a distraction. The closing numbers pick up the slack, with "Gold City" standing out as a highlight. That's until the finale, "The Holding Hand," which proves Iceage still know how to end things on a high note. It's a fantastic feat of songwriting; dripping in drama, it manages to squeeze angst out of tension rather than raucous energy, coiling itself around subtlety and then pulling taut in the closing moments before breaking down completely. Ultimately, this record is a triumph for the band, born out of strange times, and although it may not be their best, their blend of bitter and sweet still rings true. Iceage's rugged roots may be gone, and there may be fewer thorns, but Seek Shelter is still a rose by any other name. © Liam Martin /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 5, 2021 | Mexican Summer

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Folk - Released October 27, 2021 | Mexican Summer

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 22, 2021 | Mexican Summer

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 12, 2021 | Mexican Summer

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 5, 2021 | Mexican Summer

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 28, 2021 | Mexican Summer

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Pop - Released September 24, 2021 | Mexican Summer

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Pop - Released September 21, 2021 | Mexican Summer

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 15, 2021 | Mexican Summer

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Pop - Released September 9, 2021 | Mexican Summer

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Pop - Released August 10, 2021 | Mexican Summer

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 14, 2021 | Mexican Summer

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With over a lifetime of work put in, yet recorded in a night, It’s Just Wind took both forever and an instant to create. In itself, it is exactly what you would expect... it is something else entirely. Connan and his dad, Ade, decided to put pen to paper and commit to the ‘father-son album’ that they had always joked about. After Ade had a near death experience, Connan was told by a psychic that his father-son project had to be made a priority, and thus we are presented with It’s Just Wind - which does not mean anything profound, but simply relates to Ade’s flatulence problems - after all, ‘It’s Just Wind.’ This album is both an entire work in itself, yet also 10 entirely separate smaller works. The album moves effortlessly between tripworthy dreamscapes (Edge of Darkness, Round Peg in a Square Hole), funky Connan Mockasin gold tracks (What It Are, It’s Just Wind), and top notch Grandfatherly comedy, poetry, and wisdom from Ade on tracks like The Wolf, Te Awanga, Marfa and Stuck.  Although there are many standout tracks on the album, contemplating the album as a whole work itself brings it an entirely new meaning. The lines of real-life storytelling and fictional storytelling are blurred by Ade as he weaves stories and jokes through each track. Accompanied by Connan’s trippy guitars, we are taken out of this world, yet John Carroll Kirby’s synth keys and beat machine seem to keep Connan close enough to still create a grounding groove. As expected, this album is an otherworldly journey that one must take. © Jessica Porter-Langson / Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released July 8, 2021 | Mexican Summer

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 1, 2021 | Mexican Summer

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 25, 2021 | Mexican Summer

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In the summer of 2021, who of us is not exhausted by the world we’ve conjured into being? Who still believes a linear story can explain society’s trash-fire circumstances—whether the present rot, its misrepresentative history, or our own individualized grief? On her second L’Rain album, the singer-songwriter-conceptualist Taja Cheek addresses the weariness, while contemplating the process of forming unifying narratives about it. The resulting work is fractured psychedelic art-pop steeped in Black music traditions, but also a collage guided by notions that are, at once, sprawling and highly personal. Fatigue is a collection of songs, vignettes and transitions about what it means to be stuck inside the new roaring ’20s (with the humanist blues again), minus the pompous art aspirations of speaking for anyone but the thirtysomething Brooklynite. Which is funny, considering how many different voices Cheek uses to do so. Amidst a gorgeously mixed procession of symphonic bedroom-pop sonics, a litany of sampled friends, bystanders and back-up singers (including Jon Bap and Anna Wise) preach and pontificate, get caught in off-hand moments of exuberation, or in a crowd. From the sheer number of vocal tonalities, Fatigue feels like it is a work of group-subconsciousness, with Cheek’s voice and guitar its undeniable narrator. One of its most complete representations comes on the wonderfully mid-tempo "Find It" where the guitars and a chorus of voices unfurl a stately melody with a chorus ("Make a way out of no way") that attempts inspiration, but in context, actually questions such pop-psychology impulse. And yet when the latter half of "Find It" transitions to the pews of a church, there’s a singing reverend in the midst of eulogy, succeeding at inspiration ("All of my good days/ Outweigh my bad days") while an organ, a drum set and a chorus of voices build and explode all around him. In that moment, the fatigue at the album’s heart is fought with, and held at bay. Yet the feeling remains—that while we may not be alone in battling its effects, the struggle is infinite. © Piotr Orlov/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 9, 2021 | Mexican Summer

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