Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD€9.79

Rock - Released December 7, 2018 | Nuclear Blast

Cleaner and slicker than their debut, Legacy of Kings was the highly anticipated follow-up to Hammerfall's singular revival of '80s-style power metal Glory to the Brave. Bursting on the European metal scene in 1997, and almost single-handedly reviving an entire genre, Hammerfall placed themselves among the '90s vanguard with their double bass driven, dungeons and dragons epic metal that echoed "pure metal" strains reminiscent of Manowar and European old-school champions Helloween. After breaking sales records and shocking everyone with their music's stunning popularity, the lineup of Joacim Cans (vocals), Patrik Räfling (drums), Oscar Dronjak (guitars), Stefan Elmgren (guitars), and Magus Rosén (bass) returned to the studio greatly encouraged by their success and the unbelievable re-emergence of the power metal they practiced. The resulting collection was strong and steady, if a little predictable. Things start off nicely as four double bass rockers set a blinding pace. With it's exceptional chorus, "Dreamland" represents the musical high point of this first section, if not the entire record. "Warriors of Faith" is another choice track -- with it's tight drumming and accomplished guitar performances. The perfunctory ballads are just a little too cheesy, and Legacy of Kings ultimately fails to burn with the intensity of the group's debut, but '90s power metal rarely gets better than Hammerfall, even when they're slightly off their game. Fans of the genre are certainly recommended to check this record out. © Vincent Jeffries /TiVo
From
CD€9.79

Rock - Released February 20, 2009 | Nuclear Blast

Booklet
Hammerfall have had plenty of lineup changes since 1993, and 2009's No Sacrifice, No Victory finds the Swedish headbangers unveiling yet another new lineup. This time, the participants are Joacim Cans on lead vocals, Oscar Dronjak and Pontus Norgren on guitar, Fredrik Larsson on bass, and Anders Johansson on drums; guitarist Stefan Elmgren is gone, and so is bassist Magnus Rosen. But despite all the personnel changes that Hammerfall have experienced along the way, their sound hasn't changed much -- and on No Sacrifice, No Victory, they maintain their 1970s/1980s-based power metal orientation. A title like No Sacrifice, No Victory is as stereotypically power metal as it gets, and larger-than-life offerings such as "Legion," "By Any Means Necessary," and "Punish and Enslave" don't run away from power metal's dungeons-and-dragons stereotypes. In fact, Hammerfall's 2009 lineup enthusiastically embraces those stereotypes -- and while the results are predictable, they are inspired more often than not. No Sacrifice, No Victory's most surprising track is an unexpected cover of the Knack's 1979 hit "My Sharona"; Hammerfall take the song out of new wave and place it in pop-metal of the Kiss/Quiet Riot/Ratt variety. "My Sharona" is the only thing on this 49-minute CD that isn't power metal, and it's an enjoyable departure from the rest of the album. No Sacrifice, No Victory isn't Hammerfall's best or most consistent release, but there are more strong tracks than weak ones -- and many die-hard Hammerfall fans in Europe will no doubt acquire the disc simply because it is by Hammerfall. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
From
CD€10.99

Metal - Released October 23, 2020 | Napalm Records Handels GmbH

From
CD€9.79

Rock - Released October 27, 2002 | Nuclear Blast

Hammerfall's grandiose heavy metal posturing only narrowly avoids the type of self-parody exhibited by Manowar (for that matter, the bandmembers' outfits are only slightly less ridiculous than Manowar's swords-and-loincloths look). But fans of the genre probably won't care -- the band performs its soaring power metal anthems with spirit, dedication, and heroic execution on Crimson Thunder. This is pure classicism here; Hammerfall devotedly adheres to the genre guidelines of '80s power metal, without any attempts toward innovation. Includes an inspired cover version of Chastain's obscure "Angel of Mercy" and a rather pointless take on Kiss' already overdone "Detroit Rock City." © Andy Hinds /TiVo
From
CD€9.79

Rock - Released October 12, 2007 | Nuclear Blast

Booklet
From
CD€9.79

Rock - Released October 9, 2000 | Nuclear Blast

As the second wave of power metal stretched on for a period that seemed longer than the genre's original period of glory years, preeminent practitioners like Sweden's Hammerfall recognized that their sound needed sprucing up. A few musical concessions to the 21st century were needed if the group was to remain within striking distance of relevancy. Fortunately, on the 2000 Nuclear Blast release Renegade, Hammerfall took a collective glimpse into the future, turning away ever so slightly from their '80s metal influences. The guitars still gallop and scream, the lyrics still conjure familiar images of dungeons and dragons, but the band does manage some progress while maintaining its loyalty to epic power metal. The updates on Renegade are discernible, but incremental at best. Precision is at a premium, and while the lyrics are still way over the top, there's a universal appeal to hard-charging numbers like "Keep the Flame Burning" and "Living in Victory" that speak to a marginally wider audience, not just obsessive power metal enthusiasts. © Vincent Jeffries /TiVo
From
CD€9.79

Rock - Released December 1, 2017 | Nuclear Blast

Booklet
Glory to the Brave is indeed a classic power metal record -- no frills or progressive elements here, just speed-laden, melodic, grandiose anthems about honor, glory, and slaying dragons. And the group manages to generally steer clear of the campiness that plagued bands like Manowar. Of note are the pro-Crusades lyrics of "Steel Meets Steel," atypical sentiments in a genre known for rebelling against religion. Overall this stuff isn't new or groundbreaking, but it's performed passionately enough that you'd think you were starting to experience the New Wave of British Heavy Metal the first time around. Hammerfall also gets points for covering Warlord's long-lost classic "Child of the Damned." © Bryan Reesman /TiVo
From
CD€10.99

Metal - Released August 16, 2019 | Napalm Records Handels GmbH

From
HI-RES€14.79
CD€9.79

Rock - Released September 2, 2014 | Nuclear Blast

Hi-Res Booklet
From
CD€9.79

Rock - Released March 9, 2005 | Nuclear Blast

From
CD€9.79

Rock - Released June 27, 1997 | Nuclear Blast

Glory to the Brave is indeed a classic power metal record -- no frills or progressive elements here, just speed-laden, melodic, grandiose anthems about honor, glory, and slaying dragons. And the group manages to generally steer clear of the campiness that plagued bands like Manowar. Of note are the pro-Crusades lyrics of "Steel Meets Steel," atypical sentiments in a genre known for rebelling against religion. Overall this stuff isn't new or groundbreaking, but it's performed passionately enough that you'd think you were starting to experience the New Wave of British Heavy Metal the first time around. Hammerfall also gets points for covering Warlord's long-lost classic "Child of the Damned." © Bryan Reesman /TiVo
From
CD€9.79

Rock - Released October 20, 2006 | Nuclear Blast

Following the unnaturally extended layoff enforced by guitarist Oscar Dronjak's motorcycle accident in 2003, Swedish heavy metal traditionalists Hammerfall waited barely a year between their eventual return with fifth album, Chapter V in 2005, and the release of LP number six, Threshold, in 2006. This suddenly rushed release schedule -- though likely resulting from nothing more than a backlog of pre-written material, ready to come out -- takes something of an uncertain turn on Threshold's first few numbers, which comprise a decent but terribly predictable title track; a lackluster autopilot job and a repetitive chorus in "The Fire Burns Forever"; and a lead-footed crawl through "Rebel Inside," which not even Accept-like choral battalions can jolt into life. Indeed, the claim may be redundant when relating to a band whose very talents involve being true to metal's classic sound, but all three simply sound too safe and formulaic. Luckily, salvation comes not a moment too soon when fourth cut, "Natural High," arrives with an energetic burst and surprisingly atypical lyrics to inject a much needed dose of excitement, which is subsequently reprised by additional standouts like "Howlin' with the 'Pac," "Shadow Empire" (boasting the album's best riff), and "Genocide," with its dramatic introductory stops and starts. In fact, with the exception of another, check-your-watch drag-fest called "Carved in Stone," most every remaining track has something memorable to recommend it. "Dark Wings, Dark Words" is the record's ambitious and evocative semi-ballad, "Reign of the Hammer" is a brisk, hardly groundbreaking, but nevertheless welcome instrumental, and the anthemic "Titan" provides a grand finale worthy of the Swedes' majestic habits. In other words, though it lacks the overall consistency of certain previous efforts, Threshold still produces a fair amount of quality goods to appease most Hammerfall fans -- or else it wouldn't have entered the Swedish charts at number one. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
From
CD€9.79

Rock - Released May 20, 2011 | Nuclear Blast

Booklet
From
CD€9.99

Metal - Released November 4, 2016 | Napalm Records

From
CD€9.79

Rock - Released September 28, 1998 | Nuclear Blast

From
CD€9.79

Rock - Released June 27, 2008 | Nuclear Blast

"It's as easy to listen to as metal gets, mixing traditional choices like Kiss and Judas Priest with rather more obscure Euro metal nuggets." © TiVo
From
HI-RES€14.59
CD€9.99

Metal - Released January 3, 2020 | Napalm Records Handels GmbH

Hi-Res
From
CD€9.79

Rock - Released June 10, 2011 | Nuclear Blast

From
CD€5.49

Rock - Released February 6, 2009 | Nuclear Blast

From
CD€2.79

Rock - Released September 23, 2002 | Nuclear Blast