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Pop - Released May 12, 2017 | Epic

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Pop - Released May 12, 2017 | Epic

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Pop - Released May 12, 2017 | Epic

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Pop - Released February 24, 2017 | Epic

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Pop - Released May 27, 2016 | Epic

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Pop - Released May 13, 2016 | Epic

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Displaying a professional savvy her cheerfully naïve persona belies, Meghan Trainor ditches the retro sensibilities that fueled her debut album, Title, on its swiftly released successor, Thank You. By no means has Trainor abandoned her theatricality -- whenever she slides into a purportedly soulful slurred vocal, she lets slip her stagy artifice -- but drama club exuberance is as inherent to Meghan's persona as Katy Perry's cheerleader pinup is to hers. The key to Thank You is that she's swapped out Glee-ful retro pageantry in favor of modern R&B shepherded by executive producer Ricky Reed. Such a shift in sensibility means Thank You feels fresher than Title, and it's more coherent, too: everything stems from a clean, stylish sensibility. Even when she indulges in a throwback, as when the lights lower for the slow dance "Hopeless Romantic," the simple guitar and vocal arrangements function as a sly accent to the bright, bustling surroundings of the rest of Thank You. Trainor similarly rejiggers her lyrical outlook, leaving behind the attention-grabbing jokes and jibes, not to mention the antiquated sentiments of "Dear Future Husband," but the empowerment of "All About That Bass" has calcified into narcissism. Her self-regard abounds. "If I was you, I'd want to be me too," she sings on "Me Too," only to up the ante with "I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast, I love all y'all me the most." Even her mom is better than your mom. True, all these odes to self are designed to boost the self-esteem of her audience, but presented as an album, the positivity turns preening. That's where Trainor's pop instincts come into play. Thank You camouflages all this vanity as shiny, happy pop, equal parts modern R&B and Y2K throwback. Taken on a track by track basis, it can be silly fun -- even such goofball party numbers as "Dance Like Yo Daddy" contain a guileless charm -- but as a collective, Thank You turns into something less than the sum of its parts almost entirely due to the Trainor's tunnel vision. She's smart to keep things light and positive -- it's a deliberately youthful sound in an era that yearns for maturity -- but by working the same territory so carefully, the seams in her construction are difficult to ignore. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released May 13, 2016 | Epic

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Displaying a professional savvy her cheerfully naïve persona belies, Meghan Trainor ditches the retro sensibilities that fueled her debut album, Title, on its swiftly released successor, Thank You. By no means has Trainor abandoned her theatricality -- whenever she slides into a purportedly soulful slurred vocal, she lets slip her stagy artifice -- but drama club exuberance is as inherent to Meghan's persona as Katy Perry's cheerleader pinup is to hers. The key to Thank You is that she's swapped out Glee-ful retro pageantry in favor of modern R&B shepherded by executive producer Ricky Reed. Such a shift in sensibility means Thank You feels fresher than Title, and it's more coherent, too: everything stems from a clean, stylish sensibility. Even when she indulges in a throwback, as when the lights lower for the slow dance "Hopeless Romantic," the simple guitar and vocal arrangements function as a sly accent to the bright, bustling surroundings of the rest of Thank You. Trainor similarly rejiggers her lyrical outlook, leaving behind the attention-grabbing jokes and jibes, not to mention the antiquated sentiments of "Dear Future Husband," but the empowerment of "All About That Bass" has calcified into narcissism. Her self-regard abounds. "If I was you, I'd want to be me too," she sings on "Me Too," only to up the ante with "I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast, I love all y'all me the most." Even her mom is better than your mom. True, all these odes to self are designed to boost the self-esteem of her audience, but presented as an album, the positivity turns preening. That's where Trainor's pop instincts come into play. Thank You camouflages all this vanity as shiny, happy pop, equal parts modern R&B and Y2K throwback. Taken on a track by track basis, it can be silly fun -- even such goofball party numbers as "Dance Like Yo Daddy" contain a guileless charm -- but as a collective, Thank You turns into something less than the sum of its parts almost entirely due to the Trainor's tunnel vision. She's smart to keep things light and positive -- it's a deliberately youthful sound in an era that yearns for maturity -- but by working the same territory so carefully, the seams in her construction are difficult to ignore. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released November 20, 2015 | Epic

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Pop - Released October 14, 2015 | Epic

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Pop - Released January 9, 2015 | Epic

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"All About That Bass" spread throughout the globe with the speed of a pandemic disease, and its viral nature neatly camouflaged how Meghan Trainor was no naïve ingénue. She landed a publishing deal at the age of 18 and had one of her songs recorded by pop-country superstars Rascal Flatts, show-biz bona fides that belied her Internet sensation status. Title, Trainor's full-length debut, suggests this tactic was deliberate: snag an audience via a near-novelty, then rely on her well-honed craft for the rest of the record. Certainly, echoes of "All About That Bass" can be heard throughout Title, particularly in how she and her chief collaborator Kevin Kadish balance a love of old-fashioned girl group pop with old-school hip-hop, but the cumulative effect of the album's 15 tracks is to shift attention away from her cutesy style to her songwriting skills. Admittedly, Trainor is eager to embrace her enthusiasm for musical theater -- she's the first post-Glee pop star, consciously putting on a show as she sways between rapped verses and cabaret choruses, liberally borrowing from Dion's "Runaround Sue" for "Dear Future Husband," making sure that she laughs after delivering a pun on her own last name -- but over the course of a record the affectations don't seem quite as potent as they do when they're distilled to a single. By the time the record winds its way around to the Motown bounce of "Lips Are Movin" -- a single equally inspired by vintage 45s and Amy Winehouse's snazzy new-millennial revival that's the best song here -- Trainor's giddiness has become ingratiating, so it's easier to warm to her considerable skill at pastiche and performance. Far from consigning her to one-hit wonder territory, the blend of strength of personality and music-biz savvy on Title shows that Meghan Trainor is clever enough to parlay a big hit into a real career. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released January 9, 2015 | Epic

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"All About That Bass" spread throughout the globe with the speed of a pandemic disease, and its viral nature neatly camouflaged how Meghan Trainor was no naïve ingénue. She landed a publishing deal at the age of 18 and had one of her songs recorded by pop-country superstars Rascal Flatts, show-biz bona fides that belied her Internet sensation status. Title, Trainor's full-length debut, suggests this tactic was deliberate: snag an audience via a near-novelty, then rely on her well-honed craft for the rest of the record. Certainly, echoes of "All About That Bass" can be heard throughout Title, particularly in how she and her chief collaborator Kevin Kadish balance a love of old-fashioned girl group pop with old-school hip-hop, but the cumulative effect of the album's 15 tracks is to shift attention away from her cutesy style to her songwriting skills. Admittedly, Trainor is eager to embrace her enthusiasm for musical theater -- she's the first post-Glee pop star, consciously putting on a show as she sways between rapped verses and cabaret choruses, liberally borrowing from Dion's "Runaround Sue" for "Dear Future Husband," making sure that she laughs after delivering a pun on her own last name -- but over the course of a record the affectations don't seem quite as potent as they do when they're distilled to a single. By the time the record winds its way around to the Motown bounce of "Lips Are Movin" -- a single equally inspired by vintage 45s and Amy Winehouse's snazzy new-millennial revival that's the best song here -- Trainor's giddiness has become ingratiating, so it's easier to warm to her considerable skill at pastiche and performance. Far from consigning her to one-hit wonder territory, the blend of strength of personality and music-biz savvy on Title shows that Meghan Trainor is clever enough to parlay a big hit into a real career. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Miscellaneous - Released October 21, 2014 | Epic

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Miscellaneous - Released July 1, 2014 | Epic