Similar artists

Albums

£13.99

Rock - Released February 8, 2005 | Rhino - Elektra

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
£4.54£11.56

Dance - Released January 1, 2007 | Stax

Although he is far from a household name in the 21st century, as a songwriter, producer, and performer Eddie Floyd made regular visits to the R&B charts from the mid-'60s through the mid-'70s while he was a part of the legendary Stax Records family. Floyd was originally hired by Stax as a writer and, paired with MG's guitarist Steve Cropper, he wrote several hits for the label, including one for himself, the classic "Knock on Wood" (based on the chord progression for "In the Midnight Hour" reversed), which was Floyd's second single when it was released in 1966. Later, Floyd began writing with another MG's member, Booker T. Jones, and his stay at Stax neatly divides into a Cropper era and a Jones era, both of which are covered in this fine 20-track set. Included are "Knock on Wood," the poignant "Big Bird" (written in the wake of Otis Redding's death, it should have been a bigger hit and remains a favorite of many collectors of vintage soul sides), and a strong cover of Sam Cooke's "Bring It on Home to Me," as well as essentially every key track Floyd sang lead on for Stax. He did much more behind the scenes as a writer and producer, but this set makes a solid introduction to Floyd as a performer, and while he might not have bottled dynamite on-stage quite as famously as Redding or Wilson Pickett, he certainly knew what to do with the recipe. The very definition of unsung, Eddie Floyd truly deserves a wider contemporary audience. ~ Steve Leggett
£8.18£14.03

R&B - Released January 1, 1993 | Stax

The finest album Eddie Floyd ever made for Stax, this late-'60s gem included both "I've Never Found a Girl" and "Knock on Wood," his two most magnificent hits and two Southern soul anthems. Floyd was never as transcendent or striking a vocalist as Otis Redding or even William Bell, but he was consistent and dependable. He was backed by both Booker T. & the MG's and the Memphis Horns (then called the Mar-Kay Horns). A CD reissue of this set adds several tracks, including some smoking duets with Mavis Staples. ~ Ron Wynn
£3.99

Blues - Released February 8, 2016 | Shami Media Group

£7.89

R&B - Released February 27, 2015 | StarPointe Records

£7.99

R&B - Released February 11, 2014 | LocoBop

£3.99

R&B - Released January 3, 2014 | Serenity Records

£7.89

R&B - Released March 21, 2011 | Charly Records

£4.32

Rock - Released January 1, 2008 | Purple Pyramid

£4.54£12.86

Soul - Released January 1, 2008 | Stax

As a songwriter, producer, and performer, Eddie Floyd made regular visits to the R&B charts from the mid-'60s through the mid-'70s while he was part of the legendary Stax Records family. Floyd was originally hired by Stax as a writer and, paired with MG's guitarist Steve Cropper, he wrote several hits for the label, including one for himself, the classic "Knock on Wood" (based on the chord progression for "In the Midnight Hour" reversed), which was Floyd's second single when it was released in 1966. Now in his seventies, Floyd has released a new album on the freshly revived Stax imprint that finds him revisiting some of his classic songs from the old Stax days and reaching even further back to songs he wrote when he was a member of the Falcons in the 1950s. Produced by Michael Dinallo and Ducky Carlisle (collectively known as the Tremelo Twins), Eddie Loves You So is perfectly imagined, sounding like it could have come out in 1967 with that wonderfully funky loose vintage Stax soul sound and nary a synth, drum loop, or any kind of hip-hop flavoring present. There has been no attempt here to update Floyd's sound, which is a definite plus. It means he's in his element, and while his voice is just a bit shopworn these days, it actually adds a certain charm to things (he is, after all, in his seventh decade). The bottom line is that this guy has been a top-notch R&B songwriter for a long time, and the evidence here is compelling. "Since You Been Gone," written in 1957 and demoed (but never officially recorded) by the Falcons, is a brilliant song and Floyd pins it to the wall in this new version. Other gems on this heartwarming set are Floyd's take on "You Don't Know What You Mean to Me," written by Floyd and Cropper for Sam & Dave, who recorded it in 1968; "You're So Fine" (another song from the Falcons' catalog, actually written by Willie Schofield and Lance Finney); and the beautiful, smooth, and comforting "Consider Me." Eddie Loves You So is a complete delight and all the more so for never attempting to be current or up to date. It is Eddie Floyd doing what Eddie Floyd does best. He sings his heart out. ~ Steve Leggett
£10.99

Rock - Released March 19, 2007 | Rhino Atlantic

As a songwriter, producer, and performer, Eddie Floyd made regular visits to the R&B charts from the mid-'60s through the mid-'70s while he was a part of the legendary Stax Records family. Floyd was originally hired by Stax as a writer and, paired with MG's guitarist Steve Cropper, he wrote several hits for the label, including one for himself, the classic "Knock on Wood" (based on the chord progression for "In the Midnight Hour" reversed), which was Floyd's second single when it was released in 1966. Later, Floyd began writing with another MG's member, Booker T. Jones, and his stay at Stax neatly divides into a Cropper era and a Jones era, both of which are covered in this fine 20-track set. Included are "Knock on Wood," the poignant "Big Bird" (written in the wake of Otis Redding's death, it should have been a bigger hit and remains a favorite of many collectors of vintage soul sides), the delightfully optimistic "Love Is a Doggone Good Thing," and a brilliant version of "I Stand Accused." The very definition of unsung, Eddie Floyd truly deserves a wider contemporary audience, and it's virtually impossible to imagine any collection of his sides that isn't worth the price of admission. ~ Steve Leggett
£4.54£12.86

R&B - Released January 1, 2007 | Stax

Although he wasn't getting massive hits, Eddie Floyd continued to make solid Southern soul material in the late '60s. This album did have three moderately successful singles, but more importantly, every track features effective wailing leads and country/blues arrangements. An excellent example of the Stax sound. ~ Ron Wynn
£7.89

Soul/Funk/R&B - Released June 25, 2006 | Charly Records

£4.54£11.56

Dance - Released January 1, 2006 | Stax

As part of the Stax Profiles series, soul vocalist Eddie Floyd is spotlighted with material recorded between 1966 and 1971 for the Memphis-based label. Actor/comedian, Blues Brother, and super fan Dan Aykroyd, who made sure the singer had a part in the Blues Brothers 2000 flick, selected the 13 cuts on this compilation and did an admirable job of combining the hits "Knock on Wood" and "I've Never Found a Girl (To Love Me Like You Do)" with several lesser-heard gems. For the curious, the disc offers a trimmed yet balanced overview of Eddie Floyd's time at Stax, backed up in various settings by the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section, Con Funk Shun, the Memphis Horns, and Booker T. & the MG's, which not only makes this a quality introduction to the vocalist but to the overall Stax sound as well. ~ Al Campbell
£4.54£7.49

R&B - Released January 1, 1997 | Stax

Floyd's seventh and last album for Stax contained a tiny R&B hit in the title track. The record employed the Con Funk Shun rhythm section that would soon rise to soul stardom on their own. But there wasn't much special about the tunes, which revealed some influences from the sounds of Philadelphia and Hi Records, both of which were then peaking in popularity. The CD reissue pairs the album and its predecessor, Baby, Lay Your Head Down (Gently on My Bed), onto one disc, although it's sequenced so that the earlier LP plays first. ~ Richie Unterberger