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Vijay Iyer|Tragicomic

Tragicomic

Vijay Iyer

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Vijay Iyer and alto saxophonist Rudresh Mahanthappa blend their Indian heritage with the influence of their New York jazz experience in this striking session, where they're joined by bassist Stephan Crump and drummer Marcus Gilmore. The haunting miniature "The Weight of Things" (credited to the entire quartet) leads into the furious protest song "Macaca Please" (the latter title based on a slur uttered by a U.S. senator during the 2006 campaign), a cauldron of many influences. Iyer's dramatic reworking of Bud Powell's obscure "Comin' Up" gives it a more contemporary flavor, though the reggae rhythm gets tiresome after a while. Iyer's solo interpretation of the standard "I'm All Smiles" is more conventional, though with a bittersweet flavor. "Threnody" is not to be confused with Marian McPartland's composition; Iyer's haunting melody has a sense of foreboding disaster. Recommended.
© Ken Dryden /TiVo

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Tragicomic

Vijay Iyer

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1
The Weight of Things
00:02:17

Vijay Iyer, MainArtist

2008 Sunnyside Communications 2008 Sunnyside Communications

2
Macaca Please
00:04:54

Vijay Iyer, MainArtist

2008 Sunnyside Communications 2008 Sunnyside Communications

3
Aftermath
00:06:20

Vijay Iyer, MainArtist

2008 Sunnyside Communications 2008 Sunnyside Communications

4
Comin’ up
00:04:22

Vijay Iyer, MainArtist

2008 Sunnyside Communications 2008 Sunnyside Communications

5
Without Lions
00:02:54

Vijay Iyer, MainArtist

2008 Sunnyside Communications 2008 Sunnyside Communications

6
Mehndi
00:06:50

Vijay Iyer, MainArtist

2008 Sunnyside Communications 2008 Sunnyside Communications

7
Age of Everything
00:05:23

Vijay Iyer, MainArtist

2008 Sunnyside Communications 2008 Sunnyside Communications

8
Window Text
00:05:41

Vijay Iyer, MainArtist

2008 Sunnyside Communications 2008 Sunnyside Communications

9
I’m All Smiles
00:04:44

Vijay Iyer, MainArtist

2008 Sunnyside Communications 2008 Sunnyside Communications

10
Machine Days
00:07:28

Vijay Iyer, MainArtist

2008 Sunnyside Communications 2008 Sunnyside Communications

11
Threnody
00:06:02

Vijay Iyer, MainArtist

2008 Sunnyside Communications 2008 Sunnyside Communications

12
Becoming
00:03:38

Vijay Iyer, MainArtist

2008 Sunnyside Communications 2008 Sunnyside Communications

Album Description

Vijay Iyer and alto saxophonist Rudresh Mahanthappa blend their Indian heritage with the influence of their New York jazz experience in this striking session, where they're joined by bassist Stephan Crump and drummer Marcus Gilmore. The haunting miniature "The Weight of Things" (credited to the entire quartet) leads into the furious protest song "Macaca Please" (the latter title based on a slur uttered by a U.S. senator during the 2006 campaign), a cauldron of many influences. Iyer's dramatic reworking of Bud Powell's obscure "Comin' Up" gives it a more contemporary flavor, though the reggae rhythm gets tiresome after a while. Iyer's solo interpretation of the standard "I'm All Smiles" is more conventional, though with a bittersweet flavor. "Threnody" is not to be confused with Marian McPartland's composition; Iyer's haunting melody has a sense of foreboding disaster. Recommended.
© Ken Dryden /TiVo

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