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Ray Brown Trio|Live At The Loa - Summer Wind (Live)

Live At The Loa - Summer Wind (Live)

Ray Brown Trio

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Ray Brown has many great contributions to jazz as a leader and a sideman, but one additional way in which he helped jazz was his encouraging Gene Harris to give up his early retirement and go back out on the road. The pianist was a part of Brown's groups for several years before he formed a working quartet and became a leader for good once again. This 1988 concert at a since-defunct Santa Monica night club (co-owned by Brown) finds the two, along with drummer Jeff Hamilton, at the top of their game. A phone ringing in the background distracts momentarily from Brown's opening solo in his composition "The Real Blues," during which Harris repeats a bluesy tremolo, which may be an inside joke about the early distraction. Harris take a blues-drenched approach to "Mona Lisa" before giving way to the leader's solo, while his lyrical approach to "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man" is shimmering. Hamilton's soft brushes are prominent in "Little Darlin'," but his explosive playing provides a powerful pulse to the very unusual strutting take of "It Don't Mean a Thing." This extremely satisfying CD is warmly recommended.
© Ken Dryden /TiVo

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Live At The Loa - Summer Wind (Live)

Ray Brown Trio

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1
Summer Wind (Live)
Ray Brown Trio
00:05:40

Heinz Meier, ComposerLyricist - Hans Bradtke, ComposerLyricist - Ray Brown Trio, MainArtist

℗ 1990 Concord Records, Inc.

2
The Real Blues (Live)
Ray Brown Trio
00:07:56

RAY BROWN, ComposerLyricist - Ray Brown Trio, MainArtist

℗ 1990 Concord Records, Inc.

3
Li'l Darlin' (Live)
Ray Brown Trio
00:08:40

Neal Hefti, ComposerLyricist - Ray Brown Trio, MainArtist

℗ 1990 Concord Records, Inc.

4
It Don't Mean A Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing) (Live)
Ray Brown Trio
00:07:12

Irving Mills, ComposerLyricist - Ray Brown Trio, MainArtist

℗ 1990 Concord Records, Inc.

5
Mona Lisa (Live)
Ray Brown
00:05:48

Jay Livingston, ComposerLyricist - RAY BROWN, MainArtist - Ray Evans, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1990 Concord Records, Inc.

6
Buhaina Buhaina (Live)
Ray Brown Trio
00:05:57

RAY BROWN, ComposerLyricist - Ray Brown Trio, MainArtist

℗ 1990 Concord Records, Inc.

7
Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man (Live)
Ray Brown Trio
00:09:31

Jerome Kern, ComposerLyricist - Oscar Hammerstein II , ComposerLyricist - Ray Brown Trio, MainArtist

℗ 1990 Concord Records, Inc.

8
Bluesology (Live)
Ray Brown Trio
00:04:57

Milt Jackson, ComposerLyricist - Ray Brown Trio, MainArtist

℗ 1990 Concord Records, Inc.

Album Description

Ray Brown has many great contributions to jazz as a leader and a sideman, but one additional way in which he helped jazz was his encouraging Gene Harris to give up his early retirement and go back out on the road. The pianist was a part of Brown's groups for several years before he formed a working quartet and became a leader for good once again. This 1988 concert at a since-defunct Santa Monica night club (co-owned by Brown) finds the two, along with drummer Jeff Hamilton, at the top of their game. A phone ringing in the background distracts momentarily from Brown's opening solo in his composition "The Real Blues," during which Harris repeats a bluesy tremolo, which may be an inside joke about the early distraction. Harris take a blues-drenched approach to "Mona Lisa" before giving way to the leader's solo, while his lyrical approach to "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man" is shimmering. Hamilton's soft brushes are prominent in "Little Darlin'," but his explosive playing provides a powerful pulse to the very unusual strutting take of "It Don't Mean a Thing." This extremely satisfying CD is warmly recommended.
© Ken Dryden /TiVo

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