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Coleman Hawkins|Coleman Hawkins Encounters Ben Webster

Coleman Hawkins Encounters Ben Webster

Coleman Hawkins, Ben Webster

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On the 16th of October 1957, Coleman Hawkins (aged 52) and Ben Webster (48) were shut away in Hollywood’s legendary Capitol studios putting together, under the guidance of Verve producer Norman Granz, an album that would go on to be an absolute classic. With Lester Young, these two tenor saxophone giants were then considered unmatchable in their skill with the instrument as confirmed in this session in which four other musicians lend their expertise: pianist Oscar Peterson, guitarist Herb Ellis, bassist Ray Brown and drummer Alvin Stoller. The respect is tangible between these two “big sound” saxophonists as they deliver a warm and often lyrical performance like never before. From Hawk’s opening Blues For Yolande a classy and classical tone is present. Nothing stands in the way of the musicians’ faultless tango as their instruments expertly yowl and stretch the tenor to its limits. The ballads are an achievement as heard on It Never Entered My Mind and Prisoner of Love. Published two years later in November 1959, Coleman Hawkins Encounters Ben Webster would doubtless make up one of the pillars of any ideal jazz nightclub worthy of the name. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz

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Coleman Hawkins Encounters Ben Webster

Coleman Hawkins

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1
Blues For Yolande
00:06:47

Ben Webster, Saxophone, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - RAY BROWN, Bass Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Coleman Hawkins, Saxophone, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer, ComposerLyricist - Herb Ellis, Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Oscar Peterson, Piano, AssociatedPerformer - Alvin Stoller, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Norman Granz, Producer

℗ 1959 UMG Recordings, Inc.

2
It Never Entered My Mind
00:05:49

Richard Rodgers, Composer - Lorenz Hart, Author - Ben Webster, Saxophone, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - RAY BROWN, Bass Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Coleman Hawkins, Saxophone, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Herb Ellis, Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Oscar Peterson, Piano, AssociatedPerformer - Alvin Stoller, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Norman Granz, Producer

℗ 1959 UMG Recordings, Inc.

3
Rosita
00:05:05

Ben Webster, Saxophone, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - RAY BROWN, Bass Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Coleman Hawkins, Saxophone, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Herb Ellis, Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Oscar Peterson, Piano, AssociatedPerformer - Alvin Stoller, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Norman Granz, Producer - Gustave Haenschen, ComposerLyricist - Lester O'Keefe, ComposerLyricist - Gustave Walter Hanschen, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1959 UMG Recordings, Inc.

4
You'd Be So Nice To Come Home To
00:04:18

Cole Porter, ComposerLyricist - Ben Webster, Saxophone, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - RAY BROWN, Bass Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Coleman Hawkins, Saxophone, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Herb Ellis, Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Oscar Peterson, Piano, AssociatedPerformer - Alvin Stoller, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Norman Granz, Producer

℗ 1959 UMG Recordings, Inc.

5
Prisoner Of Love
00:04:16

Russ Columbo, ComposerLyricist - Ben Webster, Saxophone, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - RAY BROWN, Bass Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Leo Robin, ComposerLyricist - Coleman Hawkins, Saxophone, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Herb Ellis, Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Clarence Gaskill, ComposerLyricist - Oscar Peterson, Piano, AssociatedPerformer - Alvin Stoller, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Norman Granz, Producer

℗ 1959 UMG Recordings, Inc.

6
Tangerine
00:05:23

Johnny Mercer, ComposerLyricist - Ben Webster, Saxophone, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - RAY BROWN, Bass Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Victor Schertzinger, ComposerLyricist - Coleman Hawkins, Saxophone, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Herb Ellis, Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Oscar Peterson, Piano, AssociatedPerformer - Alvin Stoller, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Norman Granz, Producer

℗ 1959 UMG Recordings, Inc.

7
Shine On Harvest Moon
00:04:51

Ben Webster, Saxophone, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - RAY BROWN, Bass Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Coleman Hawkins, Saxophone, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Herb Ellis, Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Oscar Peterson, Piano, AssociatedPerformer - Alvin Stoller, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Jack Norworth, ComposerLyricist - Nora Bayes, ComposerLyricist - Norman Granz, Producer

℗ 1959 UMG Recordings, Inc.

Album Description

On the 16th of October 1957, Coleman Hawkins (aged 52) and Ben Webster (48) were shut away in Hollywood’s legendary Capitol studios putting together, under the guidance of Verve producer Norman Granz, an album that would go on to be an absolute classic. With Lester Young, these two tenor saxophone giants were then considered unmatchable in their skill with the instrument as confirmed in this session in which four other musicians lend their expertise: pianist Oscar Peterson, guitarist Herb Ellis, bassist Ray Brown and drummer Alvin Stoller. The respect is tangible between these two “big sound” saxophonists as they deliver a warm and often lyrical performance like never before. From Hawk’s opening Blues For Yolande a classy and classical tone is present. Nothing stands in the way of the musicians’ faultless tango as their instruments expertly yowl and stretch the tenor to its limits. The ballads are an achievement as heard on It Never Entered My Mind and Prisoner of Love. Published two years later in November 1959, Coleman Hawkins Encounters Ben Webster would doubtless make up one of the pillars of any ideal jazz nightclub worthy of the name. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz

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