Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD€14.99

Metal - Released June 3, 2013 | AG Records (Megadeth) 2017

Distinctions 4 étoiles Rock and Folk
Megadeth's 14th studio outing finds the venerable metal outfit parting ways with Roadrunner Records, but not with producer Johnny K (Disturbed, Staind), who brought some much needed sonic heft to 2011's Th1rt3en. Super Collider is indeed big and beefy, but it’s awfully light on flavor. Things start out promisingly enough with the blistering "Kingmaker," a thrashy, cautionary tale about oxycontin that evokes classic Megadeth, but any residual warm and fuzzy feelings vanish abruptly upon the arrival of the surprisingly out of character title cut, a rote, state fair-ready, light beer-hoisting rocker that sounds like a late-'80s/early-'90s Tesla or AC/DC throwaway (actually, how did Megadeth release an album called Super Collider before AC/DC?), which is exactly the kind of thing that the band has not only avoided, but brazenly stood against since its 1983 inception. Also, why is there a painting of Iron Man on the back cover? Things certainly don’t improve with the limp "Burn!," an artless slab of gym metal that finds the normally erudite Dave Mustaine rhyming fire with desire, a desire that "burns hotter than hell." In fact, outside of "Kingmaker," the banjo-led Rob Zombie-meets-Mark Lanegan lament "Blackest Crow" and the outstanding "Built for War," a surprisingly agile, apocalyptic anti-anthem which was co-written with drummer Shawn Drover and guitarist Chris Broderick, the latter of whom supplies the cut with some truly impressive riffage, Super Collider is so mired in midtempo drudgery and familiar hard rock (not thrash) tropes that it never really connects. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
From
HI-RES€20.59
CD€17.79

Rock - Released October 31, 2011 | Echo

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Metal - Released September 24, 1990 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

Hi-Res
A sobered-up Mustaine returns with yet another lineup, this one featuring ex-Cacophony guitar virtuoso Marty Friedman and drummer Nick Menza, for what is easily Megadeth's strongest musical effort. As Metallica was then doing, Mustaine accentuates the progressive tendencies of his compositions, producing rhythmically complex, technically challenging thrash suites that he and Friedman burn through with impeccable execution and jaw-dropping skill. Thanks to Mustaine's focus on the music rather than his sometimes clumsy lyrics, Rust in Peace arguably holds up better than any other Megadeth release, even for listeners who think they've outgrown heavy metal. While the whole album is consistently impressive, the obvious highlight is the epic, Eastern-tinged "Hangar 18." © Steve Huey /TiVo
From
CD€13.99

Metal - Released January 1, 2012 | Capitol Records

Booklet
Megadeth guns for arena thrash success and gets it on Countdown to Extinction. Following the lead of 1991's Metallica, Megadeth trades in their lengthy, progressive compositions for streamlined, tightly written and played songs more conducive to radio and MTV airplay. Cries of "sellout" seem pointless when the results are artistically (as well as commercially) successful; songs like the mega-hit "Symphony of Destruction," "Skin O' My Teeth," "Foreclosure of a Dream," and "Sweating Bullets" are among the band's best. © Steve Huey /TiVo
From
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Metal - Released September 1, 1986 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

Hi-Res
From
CD€13.99

Metal - Released November 1, 1994 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

Megadeth's follow-up to the hit Countdown to Extinction lacks the focus of its predecessor, but Youthanasia makes up the difference with more accessible, radio-friendly production and tighter riffs. Unfortunately, they have abandoned some of the more experimental, progressive elements in their music, but those are hardly missed in the jackhammer riffs of tracks like "Train of Consequences." © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD€14.99

Metal - Released January 22, 2016 | AG Records (Megadeth) 2017

As evidenced by Megadeth's last three studio albums, fans are used to being let down. Dystopia could have been another case in point when an anticipated reunion of the Rust in Peace-era lineup failed to materialize. Undaunted, Dave Mustaine recruited Lamb of God drummer Chris Adler and Brazilian guitarist Kiko Loureiro of prog metal outfit Angra. Megadeth's 15th studio album marks a return to the band's thrash roots. It's angry, extremely aggressive, but also tight and polished. Adler adds clean, thunderous playing chock-full of syncopation and Loureiro proves to be a real surprise. Mustaine has historically cooked up imaginative riffs and motifs, but has seldom had a guitarist who displays the level of creativity and style that Loureiro does. The furious, stinging opener (and first single) "The Threat Is Real" offers bracing double kick-drum work from Adler, with a blazing riff and an off-the-rails solo by Loureiro. If you can't stand Mustaine's voice, this isn't going to change your mind; it's all monotonic and every syllable is discernible. The title track single is more melodic but the kick drum and bass throb frame a chugging scalar dual guitar break before erupting into thrash. "Fatal Illusion" contains an angular vamp that borders on Hendrixian; it gives way to an Ellefson bass break and a homicidal riff with modal and fractured rock chord voicings. The intro to "Death from Within" offers one of the knottiest, gnarliest riffs Mustaine has written. The knife-like fills in the line ends draw away from the lead right back to the vamp. The anthemic backing vocals are catchy as hell. "Post American World" is grinding tension and cultural dis-ease, with Adler double-timing the band. "Poisonous Shadows" has a full-blown string orchestra and features Steve Wariner's pedal steel for added atmospherics. While "Lying in State" is the heaviest track here, "Conquer or Die!" is a cooking instrumental. Closer "Foreign Policy" comes dangerously close to pop-punk but pulls it off. While musically, Dystopia is more energetic and focused than anything Megadeth have released in quite a while, Mustaine's conceptual take on the "war on terror" and what he perceives as the "threat to America" reveals he is on his usual neoconservative political soapbox. As on Holy Wars/The Punishment Due, he uses sound samples from the modern Middle East and even employs chord voicings in some songs that derive from modal Arabic sources in order to hammer his xenophobic point home. Many will disagree with his position, but to his credit Mustaine welcomes detractors to the debate. It's easy to appreciate the music on Dystopia; it showcases Mustaine and a crack new version of Megadeth at a creative peak. It's also tempting to argue with the songwriter's politics and the hamfisted way he puts them across. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
From
HI-RES€21.29
CD€18.39

Metal - Released June 8, 2018 | Columbia - Legacy

Hi-Res
First attempt, first hit. Dave Mustaine does much more than just bouncing back, two years after his forced exit from Metallica. He not only put together a commando that straightaway positioned itself among the top four uncontested leaders of the new trash scene, but he also composed tracks that provide irrefutable proof that he was much more than a supporting role to Lars Ulrich, James Hetfield and Cliff Burton, before being suddenly replaced by Kirk Hammett on the brink of recording Kill 'em All. While it’s not an exact twin of Metallica’s first album, it undeniably appears to be a close cousin. In fact, they even have one track in common, as Mechanix is a boosted version – with the original lyrics – of The Four Horsemen, one of the three songs he co-authored and that were featured on Metallica’s first project. There’s no weak spot throughout the entire album, and the demonic version of These Boots Are Made for Walkin' (shortened as These Boots here), popularized in 1966 by Nancy Sinatra, reclaims its place, even if Dave Mustaine had to re-record the vocals with the original text of its author, Lee Hazlewood, who had threatened to sue if the band continued to exploit the song using modified lyrics. This new and “ultimate” version also features a few bonuses. In addition to the demos already available on previous re-editions, Mustaine seems to have found a few previously unreleased live tapes (on VHS!) in his attic. But the main point is that the album finally received the level of production it deserved back in 1985. Mark Lewis (Trivium, DevilDriver, Deicide, Cannibal Corpse…) remixed it, achieving a careful update without affecting its freshness and original dynamic, and the mastering was carried out by the great master Ted Jensen (Metallica, The Beatles, The Eagles, Evanescence, Green Day, Bob Marley, The Rolling Stones, AC/DC, Pantera, Machine Head…). This Killing Is My Business… And Business Is Good – a title inspired by the comic superhero The Punisher, which might be addressed to Metallica… − undoubtedly deserved this “final killing”. And, for once, it is in no way dishonest. © Jean-Pierre Sabouret/Qobuz
From
CD€13.99

Metal - Released January 1, 2004 | Capitol Records

Megadeth's follow-up to the hit Countdown to Extinction lacks the focus of its predecessor, but Youthanasia makes up the difference with more accessible, radio-friendly production and tighter riffs. Unfortunately, they have abandoned some of the more experimental, progressive elements in their music, but those are hardly missed in the jackhammer riffs of tracks like "Train of Consequences." © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD€13.99

Rock - Released July 14, 1992 | Capitol Records

Megadeth guns for arena thrash success and gets it on Countdown to Extinction. Following the lead of 1991's Metallica, Megadeth trades in their lengthy, progressive compositions for streamlined, tightly written and played songs more conducive to radio and MTV airplay. Cries of "sellout" seem pointless when the results are artistically (as well as commercially) successful; songs like the mega-hit "Symphony of Destruction," "Skin O' My Teeth," "Foreclosure of a Dream," and "Sweating Bullets" are among the band's best. © Steve Huey /TiVo
From
CD€26.49

Metal - Released March 22, 2019 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

Issued just a few years shy of their 40th year in existence, the massive 35-song compilation Warheads on Foreheads draws from every era of Megadeth's twisting but always menacing tenure. The tracks were hand-selected by bandleader Dave Mustaine, cherrypicking stand-out selections from each of their 15 studio albums (as well as a few outlier tracks) and presenting them in chronological order. Beginning with three of the stronger songs from 1985's Killing Is My Business... And Business Is Good, Mustaine charts Megadeth's progression through their string of classic thrashy '80s albums into the more accessible sounds and heightened production of their early-'90s work. Things taper off after that, with only one or two picks from most of the band's 2000s and 2010s albums like The System Has Failed, Endgame, and Super Collider. 2016's Dystopia has more of a showing, with the inclusion of four of its better songs. The flow of this massive collection highlights Megadeth's evolution more like an anthology than a greatest-hits collection. Most interesting is the resilience the band shows throughout the decades, turning in powerful compositions more dated by the production traits of the era than any signs of Mustaine and co. mellowing. Some of these songs are indispensable staples to the metal genre, from the misanthropic sneering of '80s rippers like "Wake Up Dead" to the raging riffs and political lyrics of "Symphony of Destruction." Even as the band's catalog winds into material more fan-favored than commercially successful, the band's power and technical prowess stay full throttle. Warheads on Foreheads is too dense to be an introduction for those just getting into Megadeth, but it's a detailed and well-crafted re-tracing of the band's journey from the start. © Fred Thomas /TiVo
From
CD€13.99

Metal - Released June 17, 1997 | Capitol Records

While Metallica was busy climbing to the top of the thrash-metal heap, Dave Mustaine and Megadeth were quietly carving out a niche for themselves, distinguished by intelligent songwriting and a progressive approach that avoids erratic genre-jumping. Mustaine's breadth of song subjects continues to expand on CRYPTIC WRITINGS, with topics ranging from stalkers ("I'll Get Even") and drug addiction ("Use The Man") to Armageddon wrapped in a cloak of punk anarchy ("The Disintegrators") Some of CRYPTIC WRITINGS' cooler touches include the electric sitar on "A Secret Place" and the acoustic guitar, mellotron and synths on the multi-part opening track "Trust". Throughout the album, guitarist Marty Friedman displays the exponential growth his playing has undergone since his days with Cacophany. His impressive sense of rhythm comes to the fore on "Almost Honest" and "Have Cool, Will Travel." © TiVo
From
CD€13.99

Metal - Released January 1, 2004 | Capitol Records

A largely uninspired effort recorded with a new guitarist and drummer, So Far, So Good...So What! lacks the conceptual unity and musical bite of Peace Sells, which helps push much of its lyrical material into the realm of self-parody, as Mustaine rants about the PMRC, the apocalypse, ex-girlfriends, and other people he is angry with, while hinting at the depth of his substance abuse problem with "502," a paean to driving drunk. The album wants to sound threatening but mostly comes off as forced and somewhat juvenile; typical is the embarrassing cover of "Anarchy in the U.K.," which is played in Megadeth's tightly controlled riffing style and without the looseness of the original, making it sound stilted and stiff -- and Mustaine doesn't even get the lyrics right. This one is for diehards only. © Steve Huey /TiVo
From
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Metal - Released June 3, 2013 | AG Records (Megadeth) 2017

Hi-Res
Megadeth's 14th studio outing finds the venerable metal outfit parting ways with Roadrunner Records, but not with producer Johnny K (Disturbed, Staind), who brought some much needed sonic heft to 2011's Th1rt3en. Super Collider is indeed big and beefy, but it’s awfully light on flavor. Things start out promisingly enough with the blistering "Kingmaker," a thrashy, cautionary tale about oxycontin that evokes classic Megadeth, but any residual warm and fuzzy feelings vanish abruptly upon the arrival of the surprisingly out of character title cut, a rote, state fair-ready, light beer-hoisting rocker that sounds like a late-'80s/early-'90s Tesla or AC/DC throwaway (actually, how did Megadeth release an album called Super Collider before AC/DC?), which is exactly the kind of thing that the band has not only avoided, but brazenly stood against since its 1983 inception. Also, why is there a painting of Iron Man on the back cover? Things certainly don’t improve with the limp "Burn!," an artless slab of gym metal that finds the normally erudite Dave Mustaine rhyming fire with desire, a desire that "burns hotter than hell." In fact, outside of "Kingmaker," the banjo-led Rob Zombie-meets-Mark Lanegan lament "Blackest Crow" and the outstanding "Built for War," a surprisingly agile, apocalyptic anti-anthem which was co-written with drummer Shawn Drover and guitarist Chris Broderick, the latter of whom supplies the cut with some truly impressive riffage, Super Collider is so mired in midtempo drudgery and familiar hard rock (not thrash) tropes that it never really connects. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
From
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Metal - Released September 23, 2013 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

Hi-Res
Though Megadeth and their founder Dave Mustaine have spent their entire existence just a few steps behind Mustaine's former group Metallica, it's important to remember that they've also spent a lot of time as one of the most popular metal bands in the world. The summit of their commercial success came in 1992 with fifth album Countdown to Extinction, a creative high point from Mustaine and crew possibly spurred on in ways by the footrace with Metallica and the leaps in production made on their self-titled 1991 breakthrough album. Twenty years later, Countdown still stood as Megadeth's best-selling album, and in many circles, their most loved material. Countdown to Extinction: Live is a concert document of the 20th anniversary tour that found the band playing the album front to back, bookended by a few odds and ends from other albums. While the premise seems pretty rote, the execution of the live album is surprisingly interesting. Most live re-creations of full albums fall flat in comparison to the original artifacts, and this is no exception, but it's great to hear the devoted legions sneer along with every word of Mustaine's schizophrenic monologue on "Sweating Bullets" and cheer insanely at the now-dated George Bush samples that pop up throughout the set list. The performances are pinpoint, but the live sound lacks the production and feel of the studio album and eventually the tracks blur, losing the excitement a live experience offers. While the inclusion of extra crowd favorites like "Hangar 18" and "Peace Sells" flesh things out somewhat, the thrill of the live setting doesn't completely transfer, and all but the Megadeth superfans will probably prefer revisiting the original 1992 album before diving into the strong but much duller offerings of the live album. © Fred Thomas /TiVo
From
CD€13.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2005 | Capitol Records

Dave Mustaine revived Megadeth in the mid-2000s, remastering and reissuing his band's entire Capitol catalog and hitting the concert circuit in earnest. Greatest Hits is part of that revival. It's the second Megadeth best-of, replacing the one from five years prior, Capitol Punishment. Greatest Hits is an improvement, loaded with 17 selections, three more than its predecessor. There's also some fancy packaging and a hyperbolic "Love Live Megadeth" tribute written by Penelope Spheeris, the colorful director of The Decline of Western Civilization, Pt. 2: The Metal Years. It all adds up to a nice package, or more precisely, a sampler of Megadeth, from the band's pioneering thrash metal years to its later growing pains, with an unfortunate de-emphasis on the band's beginnings. Like the previous best-of released by Capitol, Greatest Hits overlooks much of Megadeth's prime years in favor of a balanced sample of selections from every album released by the label. There's going to be a large chunk of the market that is going to groan about this approach, since the early thrash years are the reason most Megadeth fans are fans in the first place, and also the reason why the band has been able to ramble on all these years despite some mostly dull new music. Since Megadeth released so many albums for Capitol, there's never room here for more than two tracks per album: Peace Sells, Rust in Peace, Countdown to Extinction, and Youthanasia get two representations, the rest get only one. Such breadth doesn't make for the best listening experience, especially because the disc hopscotches through time. That quibble aside, Greatest Hits does give you a sample of every Megadeth album, even duds like Risk. If you're serious about getting into this band, however, you're best off going through the albums one by one. The good ones are good all the way through; if you like "Peace Sells," you're going to like Peace Sells. But if you're just curious and would like a broad one-disc sampler, Greatest Hits is your ticket. You'll end up with a good understanding of Megadeth -- old and not as old, good and not as good -- and what to expect from each album, of which there are a couple stone-cold classics. © Jason Birchmeier /TiVo
From
CD€13.99

Metal - Released September 15, 2009 | Echo

The release of 2009's Endgame brings with it a startling realization: if first-generation thrash metal fans had been polled about which of the genre's "Big Four" -- Metallica, Slayer, Anthrax, and Megadeth -- would prove to be the most resilient and consistently prolific over the next quarter century, the only sure-fire consensus would probably have been "well, anyone but Megadeth!" And yet, 12 studio albums and 150-plus songs later -- more than any of the other three have managed -- that's exactly what's come to pass. It hasn't been easy, and it's rarely been pretty along the way, but despite a few weak efforts, mostly self-inflicted controversy, and no end to verbal diarrhea, none of those other platinum-busting thrash titans have been as productive as Dave Mustaine's bunch -- all of which stands as a testament to the man's stubborn drive to prolong Megadeth's career against all odds, including drug abuse, his unfulfilled vengeance against Metallica, and even a religious reawakening! Of course, one shouldn't overlook the fact that Megadeth have always been a band in name only, thus allowing their leader to cope with voices of dissent by simply showing them the door. The "group" was also broken up for a short spell in the early 2000s while Mustaine recovered from nerve damage to his hands, after which he struggled with inspiration, creative direction, and a never-ending parade of henchmen before finally recovering much of that old Megadeth "mojo" (sonically, lyrically, and even where the cover art was concerned) on 2007's effective return to form, United Abominations. Best of all, this momentum carries on into Mustaine and company's second release for Roadrunner, Endgame, whose title apparently refers to "coming full circle" rather than any sort of goodbye, and finds the latest iteration of Megadeth -- debuting new guitarist Chris Broderick(ex-Nevermore, Jag Panzer) -- working primarily within their technical thrash comfort zone (think Peace Sells through Rust in Peace), with only a few latter-day elements and rare experimental diversions. As such, deceptively simple guitar-shredding master classes like "This Day We Fight!," "1,320" (surprisingly, written about "funny car" racing), and first single "Headcrusher" are cut from the same bloody cloth as "Wake Up Dead" and "Set the World Afire," while politicized rants such as "44 Minutes," "Bite the Hand That Feeds," and the title cut recall old stalwarts like "Peace Sells" and "Holy Wars." And for those who enjoyed Megadeth's early-'90s shift away from incessant thrashing toward the more "civilized" (but pre-sellout) Countdown to Extinction and Youthanasia albums, there are more methodical and melodically sweetened cuts like "Bodies Left Behind," "How the Story Ends," and "The Right to Go Insane." Indeed, the only song here that breaks entirely from vintage Megadeth templates is the elaborately named "The Hardest Part of Letting Go...Sealed with a Kiss," which surely owes its orchestrated string backdrops to the European metal perspective afforded by producer Andy Sneap, and tells a "love story" about entombing one's beloved behind a brick wall à la Edgar Allan Poe's The Cask of Amontillado. This one anomaly notwithstanding, however, Endgame is arguably the least commercially concerned Megadeth album since Rust in Peace some 20 years earlier, and by touching on so many of the favored songwriting styles of those early years, it should not only give their typically opinionated fan base very little to kvetch and moan about, but also throw new fuel upon the flames of Megadeth's unlikely longevity. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
From
CD€6.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2004 | Capitol Records

A sobered-up Mustaine returns with yet another lineup, this one featuring ex-Cacophony guitar virtuoso Marty Friedman and drummer Nick Menza, for what is easily Megadeth's strongest musical effort. As Metallica was then doing, Mustaine accentuates the progressive tendencies of his compositions, producing rhythmically complex, technically challenging thrash suites that he and Friedman burn through with impeccable execution and jaw-dropping skill. Thanks to Mustaine's focus on the music rather than his sometimes clumsy lyrics, Rust in Peace arguably holds up better than any other Megadeth release, even for listeners who think they've outgrown heavy metal. While the whole album is consistently impressive, the obvious highlight is the epic, Eastern-tinged "Hangar 18." © Steve Huey /TiVo
From
CD€18.59

Metal - Released October 26, 2011 | Echo

Megadeth's 13th studio album, and first since 2001’s The World Needs a Hero to utilize the talents of bassist/founding member Dave Ellefson, was produced by Johnny K (Staind, Disturbed) and features a combination of newly composed tracks, along with older cuts written years ago but never put to tape. Darker, heavier, and more immediate than 2009's Endgame, Dave Mustaine's snarling vocals ride higher in the mix this time around, but fans need not fear, as his fleet fingers are still possessed with the power to conjure the dead. Much of the aptly named Th1rt3en feels vintage, from the familiar political themes on “We the People” and the tightly wound, Dio-esque riffing on “Public Enemy No. 1” to the soft, melodramatic military snare intro of “Never Dead,” which eventually explodes into a wicked blast of retro-thrash that feels positively invigorating, not redundant. Elsewhere, the melodic slow-burn “Millennium of the Blind” fuses Ten Years After's “I’d Love to Change the World” and Metallica's “Fade to Black” into an anti-corporation/war rant that calls out the “millennials” on their submissiveness, the snaky “Black Swan” casts long shadows that mimic “Symphony of Destruction,” and first single “Sudden Death” stands defiant before the skeptics who thought that Mustaine's newfound faith would render him bereft of the old ultraviolence. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
From
CD€15.39

Metal - Released May 15, 2007 | Echo

Megadeth have been through a lot of lineup upheaval circa the early 21st century, with longtime leader Dave Mustaine being the only familiar face left in attendance. But Megadeth's crunchy, venomous thrash has remained intact, as heard throughout their 2007 release, United Abominations (their first for the Roadrunner label). While many thrash-metal bands take the easy way out lyrically -- by detailing their encounters with Señor Beelzebub -- Mustaine has never shied away from voicing his opinion about politics and the state of the world. And as evidenced by such biting tracks as "Washington Is Next!," "Gears of War," "Amerikhastan," and the title track, Mustaine remains as outspoken as ever about what he's been seeing on CNN for the past few years. Musically, Megadeth were never afraid to show off their prog-worthy chops, and the 2007 lineup (which sees Mustaine joined by bassist James LoMenzo and the sibling tandem of Glen Drover and Shawn Drover on guitar and drums) appears custom-made for tackling "tricky bits" -- including the album-opening "Sleepwalker." Elsewhere, a re-recording of "A Tout le Monde" -- as a duet between Mustaine and Lacuna Coil's Cristina Scabbia -- has "radio/MTV airplay" written all over it. They may have lost the plot for a period (remember 1999's Risk?), but with United Abominations, Mustaine and company certainly sound reborn. [The 2007 Roadrunner edition includes one bonus track.] © Greg Prato /TiVo