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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released May 1, 2021 | Freestylebeatz Ent

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Rock - Released November 11, 2012 | Nuclear Blast

Rock - Released January 17, 2020 | Nuclear Blast

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Rock - Released March 27, 2020 | Nuclear Blast

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Rock - Released July 23, 2021 | AFM Records

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Rock - Released October 1, 2021 | AFM Records

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Metal - Released May 10, 2019 | Dynamo Concerts

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Metal - Released May 10, 2019 | Dynamo Concerts

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Metal - Released February 2, 2018 | Noise Records

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Metal - Released February 9, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Metal - Released February 16, 2018 | Noise Records

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Metal - Released January 26, 2018 | Noise Records

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Metal - Released May 25, 2018 | Noise Records

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Rock - Released December 1, 2017 | Nuclear Blast

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Rock - Released January 1, 2015 | Drakkar Entertainment

Not content with his Kreator's already-established reputation as perhaps Germany's top thrash metal band of the 1980s, group mastermind Mille Petrozza spent much of the 1990s attempting to reinvent and diversify their sound, most obviously by pushing the industrial metal envelope. Alas, all to no avail, as the majority of fans were not impressed with the mostly mediocre results heard on confused albums like Renewal and Cause for Conflict. Even the welcome addition of guitar ace Tommy Vetterli (ex-Coroner) lent more consistency than actual sparks to 1997's Outcast, and 1999's similarly dependable but hardly impressive Endorama eventually followed suit. Initial highlights such as "Golden Age," the title track, and "Chosen Few" are heavy on mid-paced grooves and gothic atmospherics, but still offer little songwriting redemption. For all their studiously constructed lyrics and supposed compositional maturity, they absolutely scream for some sign, any sign, of deeper emotion to snap them out of their glazed state of performed automation. Not even the keyboards that pervade the highly unorthodox "Passage to Babylon," nor the more energetic riffing contained in "Willing Sprit" can ultimately jolt the album into a higher plane of achievement, but then, Endorama still qualifies among Kreator's most cohesive statements from this under-achieving decade. And for what it's worth, Endorama would also become the final chapter of the group's experimental phase, which was emphatically obliterated two years later by Kreator's gloriously thrashing rebirth via their magnificent tenth album, Violent Revolution. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 27, 2017 | Nuclear Blast

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Rock - Released June 1, 2012 | Nuclear Blast

Booklet
The 13th studio album of Kreator's enviable 30-year career, 2012's Phantom Antichrist is also the fourth long-player released since the group's triumphant rebirth to thrash in 2001 -- a move that coincided almost perfectly with a worldwide genre revival driven by both veteran and rookie ensembles and that, as a result, saw these German survivors enjoying a long-deferred coronation for their almost unrivaled achievements. Now that trend -- like all trends -- has come and gone, and yet Kreator persist: still displaying, as the new material contained here bears repeated witness, 100 percent commitment to the original, metal-thrashing mad raison d'être that launched them in the first place. Filled with fire and fury, indefatigable energy, and truly incensed lyrical bile for men of such middle-aged ripeness -- led as always by guiding light Mille Petrozza -- the opening title track and "Civilization Collapse" dispense a moshing master class, showing the young ones how it's done, and how it'll continue to be done as weaker, less driven bands young and old inevitably fall by the wayside. Acoustic guitar-augmented cuts like "United in Hate" and "The Few, the Proud, the Broken" prove equally devastating before they're though, and just when more commercially inclined musical considerations appear to threaten thrash's supremacy, like, say, during the highly melodic parts of "From Flood into Fire," "Victory Will Come," and "Until Our Paths Cross Again," one can rest assured that a pedal-to-the-metal onslaught lies just around the corner. To wit, both the slower, mildly Arabian-psychedelic bridge of "Death to the World" and the contemplative mood-meets-murmured vocals of "Your Heaven, My Hell" weigh in, passing at Kreator's hit-and-miss experiments of the 1990s before returning to the prevailing mosh-fest, and within that context there really can be no hard feelings -- what's past is past. The irony of which should be lost on neither fans nor the bandmembers themselves, since embracing the past clearly paved the way toward Kreator's future by affording them this second lease on life and career. Judging by the evidence available on Phantom Antichrist, it's not over yet. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 27, 2017 | Nuclear Blast

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Rock - Released February 14, 2020 | Nuclear Blast

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Rock - Released January 10, 2005 | Nuclear Blast