Thanks to the hard work carried out in cooperation with recording studios as well as an increasing number of music labels (Plus Loin Music, Bee Jazz, Ambronay Editions, Zig Zag Territoires, ECM, Mirare, Aeolus, Ondine, Winter & Winter, Laborie, etc.), Qobuz now offers a rapidly-growing selection of new releases and back catalogue records in 24-bit HD quality. These albums reproduce exactly the sound from the studio recording, and offer a more comfortable listening experience that exceeds the sound quality of a CD (typically \"reduced\" for mastering at 44.1kHz/16-bit). \"Qobuz HD\" files are DRM-free and are 100% compatible with both Mac and PC. Moving away from the MP3-focused approach that has evolved over recent years at the expense of sound quality, Qobuz provides the sound calibre expected by all music lovers, allowing them to enjoy both the convenience and quality of online music.

Note 24-bit HD albums sold by Qobuz are created by our labels directly. They are not re-encoded using SACD and we guarantee their direct source. In order to continue on this path, we prohibit any tampering with the product.

$10.99
$8.49

Soul - To be released March 15, 2019 | Sophie Records

Hi-Res
$14.99
$12.99

Soul - Released February 8, 2019 | Anti - Epitaph

Hi-Res
"It's kind of unbelievable to me that I’m still recording. I never thought I would still be singing at my age, and people seem to really want to hear me, they know me, they give me love - I'm just overwhelmed, really. I thank God every night before I go to bed and then again every morning for waking up." Few people would have imagined that at 79 years old Mavis Staples would still be reaching a wide audience and recording albums. Her inner strength is fully intact and this live performance at the Union Chapel in London just goes to prove it. Trump's America acts as a good source of inspiration and a powerful fuel for this voice that sings about God, love, and all the injustices and evils that surround us. She’s just as politically engaged as she was during The Staple Singers’ heyday (who were led by Pops Staples, her illustrious father) when the band released several protest songs for the Civil Rights Movement. Here, the gospel queen essentially sings songs from albums that she has released on the label ANTI since 2007. From Love and Trust by Ben Harper to Funkadelic's Can You Get to That and What You Gonna Do (which she sang during the sixties with The Staple Singers), from Let's Do It Again by Curtis Mayfield to Slippery People by Talking Heads, Mavis Staples’ voice turns everything it touches into gold. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
$13.49
$11.49

Soul - Released January 25, 2019 | Decca (UMO)

Hi-Res Distinctions Qobuzissime
XamVolo’s shape-shifting debut album is stunning. At only 23 years old, the Londoner-turned-Liverpudlian infuses a delicate soul hemmed with jazz and pop in All The Sweetness On The Surface, a mix that was already well distilled in his two previous EPs, Chirality (2016) and A Damn Fine Spectacle (2018). It’s an ingenious record that stretches itself over fifteen diverse tracks. Everything changes, except his warm voice that remains well-attached to his lyrics, which he unfurls nonchalantly. Lose yourself in the voluptuous R&B which is shaped by guitar riffs, distant synths, softened choirs and the heavy tempo on the suave track Lose Love. Enjoy the well-cut jazzy brass of Feels Good, which samples from Thelonious Monk's Thelonious. Succumb to the elegant soul of Old Soul. Behind those round tinted glasses, Samuel Akinlolu Folorunsho has created the perfect neo-Soul setting. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
$17.99
$11.99

Soul - Released January 11, 2019 | American Boys Entertainment

Hi-Res
$17.99
$11.99

Soul - Released December 25, 2018 | SYWEnt

Hi-Res
$14.99
$12.99

R&B - Released December 21, 2018 | Clover Music

Hi-Res
$14.99
$12.99

R&B - Released December 21, 2018 | Clover Music

Hi-Res
Kid talent show discovery JoJo's self-titled Blackground Records, Da Family-affiliated debut is a slick set of modern R&B in the vein of Brandy or Monica, with plenty of room to introduce its star's bigger-than-you'd-think presence. A bank of producers -- Vincent Herbert, Soulshock, Bink -- provide backgrounds that bump decidedly in the midrange -- there's a conscious effort to keep the focus on JoJo, and not whatever beats are currently making the grade. In other words, her vocals never sound detached from the goings-on behind her, or just a voice chattering over R&B generica. And this is promising, as the young singer really does have a tremendous voice. "Breezy" and "Homeboy" multi-track her trills, sulky whispers, and brassy wails over clicky percussion and a mixture of loops and instrumental snippets. Throughout there's talk of sheezies, throwbacks in the mix, cell phones, and the boy next door jilting poor JoJo. But even if the lyrics throughout are pretty interchangeable, vocally there's no doubt in her ability to carry the album, and the lack of irritating skits or attention-hogging guest shots is pretty refreshing. The funky jook of the Reggie and Ronald Burrell production "City Lights" features a few random "JoJo do that thing" drop-ins, but the girl gets right to the bottom of that freaky Beyoncé id, and aligns the cut with fellow standout "Not That Kinda Girl." Lead single "Leave (Get Out)" doesn't have a lot of staying power, but its guitar figure is a nice touch, and the chorus hits with the right amount of tell-off brashness. There's also a serviceable update of the 1992 SWV hit "Weak," the stripped-down strut of "Yes or No" (is that real beat boxing?), and the requisite ballad in "Never Say Goodbye." All in all, JoJo is a strong debut. Its centerpiece is never smothered with collabo pile-ons, and she's served well by the mix of arrangements and backgrounds. She's definitely courting middle-lane accessibility, but she rightly lets her singing do the talking, and that's a signal of where she's headed. ~ Johnny Loftus
$10.99
$8.49

Soul - Released December 7, 2018 | Ahômé

Hi-Res
$13.49
$11.49

Disco - Released November 23, 2018 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res
$13.49
$11.49

Disco - Released November 23, 2018 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res
$13.49
$11.49

Disco - Released November 23, 2018 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res
$14.99
$12.99

R&B - Released October 26, 2018 | Def Jam Recordings. - Atlantic Recording Corporation

Hi-Res
$14.99
$12.99

R&B - Released October 26, 2018 | Def Jam Recordings. - Atlantic Recording Corporation

Hi-Res
$13.99
$10.99

R&B - Released October 26, 2018 | RCA Records Label

Hi-Res
Following two well received EPs (So Good in 2014 and February 15 in 2015), Neo Jessica Joshua, alias Nao, released a promising first album in the summer of 2016, For All We Know. A Nottingham native who settled in East London early on, she put her high-flying soul sound into dubstep, funk, pop and R&B. Two years later, on Saturn, she applies the same formula – and while she's not the only one to offer this particular mixture, she is doing so with a certain originality. Beneath the surging currents of slightly futuristic, visceral pop, the young Brit shows off her sensual, almost puckish, voice. Jarvis Cocker's former backing singer, who made her name on Disclosure's Superego, has made a second multifaceted album, which digs deep into classical soul as much as it does into nu-soul or electronic R&B. With scraps of West African rhythms ( Drive & Disconnect), sensual R&B (Curiosity), catchy electro pop (If You Ever written with Alex Crossan AKA Mura Masa) and light soul (Make It Out Alive with the Californian SiR), Nao elegantly picks her way through the whole field of contemporary groove. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
$14.99
$12.99

R&B - Released October 12, 2018 | 10 Summers - Interscope PS

Hi-Res
$14.99
$12.99

R&B - Released October 12, 2018 | 10 Summers - Interscope PS

Hi-Res
The self-titled debut album from British R&B artist Ella Mai follows a slew of singles. Featuring production from the likes of DJ Mustard, Kosine, Lido, and H*Money, the album sees Mai deliver a collection of contemporary R&B tracks while taking inspiration from the sounds of early-'90s R&B and pop. ~ Rich Wilson
$17.49
$12.99

R&B - Released September 28, 2018 | Columbia - Legacy

Hi-Res
$17.99
$15.49

Soul - Released September 28, 2018 | BMG

Hi-Res
There are countless tributes to this little town in Alabama! Muscle Shoals: Small Town, Big Sound looks back on these productions from legendary studios M.S.S.S (Muscle Shoals Sound Studio) and Fame, that changed the history of soul music. Beyond a simple tribute, it is a flashback that reflects on an entire era. The sixties saw the rise of the great producer Rick Hall, a visionary and craftsman of soul music, but also of the Swampers, who played for a multitude of artists: Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett, Etta James, Cher, Joe Cocker, James Brown, Bob Dylan, the Rolling Stones and many others. On the fringes of country and rock’n’roll, with blues and even pop influences, it would take ten albums like this one to explore it all. This tribute album remains faithful to the magic of Muscle Shoals. Grace Potter brings Etta James back to life on I'd Rather Go Blind, Steve Tyler and Nuno Bettencourt tear up Keith and Mick’s Brown Sugar, and Kid Rock provides a little surprise with Clarence Carter’s Snatching It Back. Even the new generation joins the party! Jason Isbell, the ambassador of modern country rock, puts his spin on Candi Staton’s I Ain't Easy To Love. With groovy soul and a warm atmosphere, this project also carries a strong emotional load. Led by Rodney Hall (Rick’s son), this album is a tribute to his father who passed away in early 2018 and couldn’t see it fully finished. Needless to say, the small town with the big sound is not stopping anytime soon… © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
$14.99
$12.99

Soul - Released September 28, 2018 | Tender Loving Empire

Hi-Res Booklet
$14.99
$12.99

R&B/Soul - Released September 21, 2018 | Warner Bros.

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
Two years after his premature death, Prince’s Ali Baba cave has offered up its first treasure. With the aptly named album Piano & A Microphone 1983, it’s with the simplest devices that his art is heard. At only 25 years old, Prince had already released five albums (For You, Prince, Dirty Mind, Controversy and 1999) and was just about to release the album that would turn him into a global star, Purple Rain. The multi-instrumentalist spent his days and nights in the studio and we find him here alone at the piano for a medley of personal compositions and two covers: Joni Mitchell’s A Case Of You and the gospel song Mary Don’t You Weep. The intimate context of this recording only amplifies the intensity of this unpublished work. Just close your eyes and you’ll find yourself alone with Prince… With his elastic voice and skilled playing, the musician from Minneapolis proves to those who doubted him that he was a true artist; both entertainer and composer, showman and improviser. His stripped back version of Purple Rain touches on the sublime and the track Strange Relationship gives an insight into the evolution of his productions, as four years later the track appeared, more muscular this time, on the album Sign o’ the Times. While Piano & A Microphone 1983 may be primarily aimed at Prince fans, novices – if there are any left – will no doubt enjoy discovering this impressive artist. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz