Thanks to the hard work carried out in cooperation with recording studios as well as an increasing number of music labels (Plus Loin Music, Bee Jazz, Ambronay Editions, Zig Zag Territoires, ECM, Mirare, Aeolus, Ondine, Winter & Winter, Laborie, etc.), Qobuz now offers a rapidly-growing selection of new releases and back catalogue records in 24-bit HD quality. These albums reproduce exactly the sound from the studio recording, and offer a more comfortable listening experience that exceeds the sound quality of a CD (typically \"reduced\" for mastering at 44.1kHz/16-bit). \"Qobuz HD\" files are DRM-free and are 100% compatible with both Mac and PC. Moving away from the MP3-focused approach that has evolved over recent years at the expense of sound quality, Qobuz provides the sound calibre expected by all music lovers, allowing them to enjoy both the convenience and quality of online music.

Note 24-bit HD albums sold by Qobuz are created by our labels directly. They are not re-encoded using SACD and we guarantee their direct source. In order to continue on this path, we prohibit any tampering with the product.

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R&B - Released February 13, 2019 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released November 2, 2018 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released October 29, 2018 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released October 26, 2018 | RCA Records Label

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Following two well received EPs (So Good in 2014 and February 15 in 2015), Neo Jessica Joshua, alias Nao, released a promising first album in the summer of 2016, For All We Know. A Nottingham native who settled in East London early on, she put her high-flying soul sound into dubstep, funk, pop and R&B. Two years later, on Saturn, she applies the same formula – and while she's not the only one to offer this particular mixture, she is doing so with a certain originality. Beneath the surging currents of slightly futuristic, visceral pop, the young Brit shows off her sensual, almost puckish, voice. Jarvis Cocker's former backing singer, who made her name on Disclosure's Superego, has made a second multifaceted album, which digs deep into classical soul as much as it does into nu-soul or electronic R&B. With scraps of West African rhythms ( Drive & Disconnect), sensual R&B (Curiosity), catchy electro pop (If You Ever written with Alex Crossan AKA Mura Masa) and light soul (Make It Out Alive with the Californian SiR), Nao elegantly picks her way through the whole field of contemporary groove. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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R&B - Released October 25, 2018 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released August 31, 2018 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released August 3, 2018 | RCA Records Label

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With the completion of her proper debut album held up by steady touring obligations, Gabi Wilson, aka H.E.R., opted to pacify listeners with I Used to Know Her: The Prelude, a six-track, 20-minute EP. Made with the likes of Ronald "Flippa" Colson, Dernst "D'Mile" Emile, and Jeff "Gitty" Gitelman, it's another short set dominated by confident slow jams, led by "Could've Been," a duet with RCA labelmate Bryson Tiller. Opener "Lost Souls" deviates from the H.E.R. norm as a fiery update of Lauryn Hill's "Lost Ones."

R&B - Released June 13, 2018 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released April 13, 2018 | RCA Records Label

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There was a point before the release of Joyride when the trajectory of Tinashe's music career appeared to be tracing that of Cassie. Tinashe had the platinum debut single with "2 On," a solid parent album, and waning momentum after relatively minor chart success with the follow-up singles. The situation worsened as the arrival of Joyride was delayed and a tour was consequently scrapped. By the time RCA matched Tinashe with labelmate Chris Brown for a non-album single in 2015 -- the year she planned to release Joyride -- it was evident that the singer and her label weren't on the same page. Two more years passed, during which Tinashe offered the stopgap commercial mixtape Nightride. A third and final version of Joyride was finally completed and released in April 2018. Remarkably, it bears no signs of a tough birth, even with the knowledge that the lead song -- the title track -- had been sold to Rihanna, unbeknown to Tinashe, who eventually bought it back. Sung in a lower register with a slightly devilish lilt, and further distinguished by Hit-Boy's slightly abrasive drums, "Joyride" simultaneously sounds like a fit for Rihanna and a striking way for Tinashe to begin her second proper album. The track ends with strings to neatly segue into the trap-styled "No Drama," where she takes a quick jab at those who have belittled her. It's one of two collaborations with Stargate, the lone full-track production holdovers from Aquarius. The other one, the bounding, bittersweet "Faded Love," features Future. Apart from the presence of those figures and some fleeting sourness, Tinashe keeps it moving with new studio support and another batch of compositions that cover romantic highs and lows. There are some missteps -- a tropical-flavored pop number that sounds a couple years late and easily forgettable, and the usage of grating bed-spring squeaks throughout the otherwise fine "Ooh La La." Nothing here is bound to pass "2 On" in terms of popularity, but the highlights are filled with rich details and seductive hooks, heard at full power on the slow jams "He Don't Want It" and "No Contest." The smoldering, slightly bluesy "Salt" and sweetly aching piano ballad "Fires and Flames" -- two additional highlights -- invalidate all claims that Tinashe is one-dimensional. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released April 13, 2018 | RCA Records Label

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There was a point before the release of Joyride when the trajectory of Tinashe's music career appeared to be tracing that of Cassie. Tinashe had the platinum debut single with "2 On," a solid parent album, and waning momentum after relatively minor chart success with the follow-up singles. The situation worsened as the arrival of Joyride was delayed and a tour was consequently scrapped. By the time RCA matched Tinashe with labelmate Chris Brown for a non-album single in 2015 -- the year she planned to release Joyride -- it was evident that the singer and her label weren't on the same page. Two more years passed, during which Tinashe offered the stopgap commercial mixtape Nightride. A third and final version of Joyride was finally completed and released in April 2018. Remarkably, it bears no signs of a tough birth, even with the knowledge that the lead song -- the title track -- had been sold to Rihanna, unbeknown to Tinashe, who eventually bought it back. Sung in a lower register with a slightly devilish lilt, and further distinguished by Hit-Boy's slightly abrasive drums, "Joyride" simultaneously sounds like a fit for Rihanna and a striking way for Tinashe to begin her second proper album. The track ends with strings to neatly segue into the trap-styled "No Drama," where she takes a quick jab at those who have belittled her. It's one of two collaborations with Stargate, the lone full-track production holdovers from Aquarius. The other one, the bounding, bittersweet "Faded Love," features Future. Apart from the presence of those figures and some fleeting sourness, Tinashe keeps it moving with new studio support and another batch of compositions that cover romantic highs and lows. There are some missteps -- a tropical-flavored pop number that sounds a couple years late and easily forgettable, and the usage of grating bed-spring squeaks throughout the otherwise fine "Ooh La La." Nothing here is bound to pass "2 On" in terms of popularity, but the highlights are filled with rich details and seductive hooks, heard at full power on the slow jams "He Don't Want It" and "No Contest." The smoldering, slightly bluesy "Salt" and sweetly aching piano ballad "Fires and Flames" -- two additional highlights -- invalidate all claims that Tinashe is one-dimensional. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released December 15, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released December 13, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released October 31, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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After Royalty was released toward the end of 2015, Chris Brown's market saturation strategy continued to play out and occasionally pay off. During the next two years, he was featured on roughly two-dozen tracks, including DJ Khaled's "Do You Mind," and let loose a glut of headlining singles that led to his eighth solo full-length. Termed a double album, Heartbreak on a Full Moon indeed fits on two CDs, but the track count is equal to that of the singer's three previous solo albums combined. This abundance is a scheme to exploit the "consumption"-oriented data that drives chart placements. Unlike most double albums, there's no concept here, and no attempt was made to separate the material into themes -- perhaps for the better, so as to not add another layer of gimmickry. It's artistically conservative, at least by Brown's standards, covering his regular circuit of trap-styled slow jams, skeletal ballads, and brighter pop-oriented numbers, with the mood often swinging from playboy-hedonistic to sweet-romantic to scorned-acidic, sometimes within one track. The stand-outs are enough to make for a 45-minute listen that surpasses his previous album, and clearing out the tracks on which Brown's tenor slips from pleading to whining makes it easier to reach them with convenience. Beneath better singles such as "Questions" (a dancehall-pop number cleverly referencing Kevin Lyttle's "Turn Me On"), "High End" (a sleek, almost ambient cut with Young Thug and Future), and "Confidence" (possibly Brown's most winsome song since Exclusive), there's some depth, though it does require sifting. Among the better deep cuts is "Yellow Tape." A lurid rumination on the downside of fame, its foreboding hook has a lingering effect lasts almost as long as the album itself. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released October 31, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released October 20, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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Nine months after the first EP, a second H.E.R. release of similar length arrived through major-label RCA. Like the debut, this is a softly glowing set of ballads and slow jams concerning the romantic affairs of the unidentified, consistently understated singer (presumably Gabriella Wilson, going by the publishing credits). The songs with the most lasting value, such as the aching, lingering likes of "Every Kind of Way," "Avenue," and "Changes," deviate from the trap stylings elsewhere, further distinguishing the artist from label and touring mate Bryson Tiller. Among the songwriting partners here are Darhyl Camper, Tiara Thomas, and Hue Strother. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released October 20, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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This release combines the EPs H.E.R., Vol. 1 (released in September 2016) and H.E.R., Vol. 2 (released in June 2017) and adds six new tracks (referred to as B-sides), including "Best Part," a duet that appeared on Daniel Caesar's Freudian. The previously unissued songs are in the same vein as the material on the EPs -- predominantly slow and atmospheric, vulnerable yet assured, verging on mood music but with a little more sonic, melodic, and lyrical substance than the average set from H.E.R.'s stylistic peers.
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R&B - Released September 20, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released September 15, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released June 2, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released February 17, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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Charlie Wilson breaks his streak of album titles featuring his first name -- why not Charlie 8? -- but the material on In It to Win It mostly sticks to an "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" approach that has brought the singer commercial and Grammy-nominated success for well over a decade. Wilson continues to offer traditional, uplifting R&B that sounds modern and mature without pandering to younger or older audiences. He simply stocks the album with affectionate, gracious love songs and breaks them up with the occasional upbeat funk track or contemporary gospel number -- nothing fancy. This features more guest vocalists than any of Wilson's previous albums. Unsurprisingly, the duets with the fellow singers -- "Smile for Me," featuring Robin Thicke, and "Made for Love," with Lalah Hathaway -- win out. The songs containing appearances from T.I., Pitbull, and Wiz Khalifa wouldn't be less substantive with Wilson as the lone voice. ~ Andy Kellman