Thanks to the hard work carried out in cooperation with recording studios as well as an increasing number of music labels (Plus Loin Music, Bee Jazz, Ambronay Editions, Zig Zag Territoires, ECM, Mirare, Aeolus, Ondine, Winter & Winter, Laborie, etc.), Qobuz now offers a rapidly-growing selection of new releases and back catalogue records in 24-bit HD quality. These albums reproduce exactly the sound from the studio recording, and offer a more comfortable listening experience that exceeds the sound quality of a CD (typically \"reduced\" for mastering at 44.1kHz/16-bit). \"Qobuz HD\" files are DRM-free and are 100% compatible with both Mac and PC. Moving away from the MP3-focused approach that has evolved over recent years at the expense of sound quality, Qobuz provides the sound calibre expected by all music lovers, allowing them to enjoy both the convenience and quality of online music.

Note 24-bit HD albums sold by Qobuz are created by our labels directly. They are not re-encoded using SACD and we guarantee their direct source. In order to continue on this path, we prohibit any tampering with the product.

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Funk - Released November 14, 1981 | Legacy Recordings

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The end was near for Earth, Wind & Fire. Raise! wasn't quite the disaster it was made out to be at the time, but it was their least distinguished overall album since the early days on Warner Bros., with the exception of their participation in the awful Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band film soundtrack in 1978. "Let's Groove" was just a recycled mid-tempo tune from the mid-'70s, and everything else sounded desultory and uninspired. It was no surprise that after two more albums Maurice White and Company decided to take some time away from the scene. ~ William Ruhlmann
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R&B/Soul - Released July 25, 2008 | Legacy Recordings

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Back in March 2004 music magazine Mojo included Withers' fourth album on a list of "67 Lost Albums You Must Own." Whether 'Justments is indeed the stuff of legend remains debatable. Surely no holy grail like the similarly mentioned Cold Fact by Sussex labelmate Sixto Rodriguez, it seems at least unfairly ignored. Nothing here might be as compelling as "Grandma's Hands" or "I Can't Write Left-Handed," but there are plenty of melancholy reflections from a genuine soulman who came across more as a West coast singer/songwriter. Replacing the hired hands of his debut with former employees of Charles Wright & the Watts 103rd Street Rhythm Band proved equally important in shaping Withers' identity. Not only had they been instrumental in creating a landmark with his second album Still Bill, follow-up Live at Carnegie Hall showed how easily they could replicate their unrestrained approach on-stage, performing quite a few tunes which hadn't yet appeared on a studio album. This experience further tightening a natural combination, the band was set for Withers' third studio album. The moody overtones of 'Justments suggest both band and singer might have suffered a bit from fatigue, a notion not altogether far-fetched since they would dissolve upon completing it. Not even Spanish minstrel José Feliciano could rescue a song like "Railroad Man" from getting stuck in a not unpleasant but ultimately unrewarding jam mode. Still, a few gems are worth mentioning. The spine-tingling string sections for "You" and "Ruby Lee" for instance invoke the memory of Still Bill's intriguing "Who Is He and What Is He to You." The former would be released as a single and crack the Top 15 R&B chart, as would "Heartbreak Road" and "The Same Love That Made Me Laugh." The demise of Sussex led to both the labels' catalog and Withers himself being transferred to Columbia. Though some of its feel would always shine through his releases for his new employer, 'Justments stands out for being the last album where the artist's unique character takes the foreground rather than being mostly left to drown in a glossy production. Thus, while its "lost album" status is mostly due to it being out of print for ages, in a just world it would be re-released back to back with 1975's Making Music. This just might turn out historically interesting, as it would document Withers' evolution towards the guilty pleasure of "Lovely Day." ~ Quint Kik
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R&B - Released November 28, 2014 | Legacy Recordings

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Funk - Released May 1, 2012 | Legacy Recordings

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Funk - Released November 1, 1972 | Legacy Recordings

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R&B - Released November 28, 2014 | Legacy Recordings

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Both commercially and artistically, switching from Motown to Buddah in the mid-'70s proved to be a very wise move for Gladys Knight & the Pips. Imagination and Claudine were gem-laden smashes, and their winning streak continued with their third Buddah date I Feel a Song. The dramatic "I Feel a Song (In My Heart)" and an unlikely remake of Barbra Streisand's "The Way We Were" became major hits, as did the soaring ballad "Love Finds Its Own Way." Knight's monologue on "The Way We Were" is most ironic -- reflecting on the nostalgia that seems to be human nature, she noted that 1974 would someday become "the good old days." And when disco era-nostalgia took hold in the '90s, post-baby boomers seemed to be expressing a belief that the '70s were a simpler, less stressful time. Equally appealing are the gritty numbers "Better You Go Your Way" (written by Bill Withers) and "Don't Burn Down the Bridge." If one notices that "Seconds" sounds like something Dionne Warwick would have done early in her career, it's no coincidence -- Burt Bacharach (who also co-wrote many of Warwick's early hits) co-wrote the song. Thanks to Capitol-EMI's R&B-oriented reissue label The Right Stuff, I Feel a Song was finally heard on CD in 1997. ~ Alex Henderson
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R&B - Released November 7, 2014 | Legacy Recordings

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Some Gladys Knight fans think that she didn't record as a solo artist until the early 1990s. But in fact, her first solo albums came in the late 1970s, when she provided 1978's Miss Gladys Knight for Buddah and 1979's Gladys Knight for Columbia. Neither album was a huge seller; only her most diehard fans bought the LPs. The singer's second, and self-titled, solo album isn't remarkable, but is a generally decent effort that ranges from R&B/adult contemporary ballads ("You Loved Away the Pain," "I Just Want to Be With You," "My World") to up-tempo soul-disco offerings like "You Bring Out the Best in Me" and "You Don't Have to Say I Love You," both of which would appeal to a Loleatta Holloway or Thelma Houston fan. Meanwhile, the vibrant, Earth, Wind & Fire-ish "It's the Same Old Song" isn't unlike something that EWF leader Maurice White would have produced for the Emotions in the late 1970s, and Knight's version of Leiber & Stoller's "I (Who Have Nothing)" recalls her dramatic 1964 hit "Giving Up." This LP, which she produced with Jack Gold, isn't recommended to casual listeners, who would be much better off with an anthology of her classic Motown and Buddah recordings with the Pips. But it's a likable record that is worth hearing if you're among Knight's hardcore fans. ~ Alex Henderson
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R&B - Released December 5, 2014 | Legacy Recordings

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The final album on Columbia for Gladys Knight & The Pips did reasonably well, getting them three chart hits, but it didn't include any of the anthemic R&B or pop crossover songs they had been landing in the '80s. It was a well-produced effort, and Knight sang with her usual vigor, spirit, and intensity, but nothing seemed to click on the level that Knight And The Pips expected. ~ Ron Wynn
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R&B - Released December 18, 2015 | Legacy Recordings

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R&B - Released April 22, 2016 | Legacy Recordings

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Commercially, Earth, Wind & Fire were slipping in 1983. Though a decent album, Powerlight wasn't the type of big seller EWF was used to. Maurice White responded with a change of direction that proved to be both a commercial and artistic fiasco. Working with very in-demand (and very formula-oriented) studio figures like Martin Page and David Foster, EWF went for a much slicker and more high-tech approach on the weak and disappointing Electric Universe. White saw that synthesizers and drum machines were playing more and more of a role in both R&B and pop, and wanted to acknowledge technology's impact on music with this album. But EWF usually ends up sounding insincere and even sterile. The type of synth-funk that worked so well for the System doesn't work for EWF. A few of the songs are interesting (including "Electric Kingdom" and the single "Magnetic"), but they don't prevent Electric Universe from being EWF's weakest album ever. When this release flopped, EWF's members temporarily went their separate ways, with Philip Bailey and Maurice White concentrating on solo careers. ~ Alex Henderson
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Funk - Released October 17, 2014 | Legacy Recordings

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R&B - Released February 24, 2015 | Legacy Recordings

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R&B/Soul - Released July 25, 2008 | Legacy Recordings

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It can prove somewhat difficult to place Bill Withers among his peers. Despite a brief revival thanks to Quentin Tarantino's Jackie Brown, he will always remain something of an outsider to the soul movement. Starting out as an aircraft mechanic for the Navy, his performing career happened more or less by accident. Surprised to be invited to re-record his own demos -- a modest Withers had intended his songs for others -- he came forth with two brilliant albums chock-full of intriguing stories on mournful alcoholics, adulterers, and his late grandmother's hands. His exceptional talent as a storyteller placed him perhaps more in league with West Coast singer songwriters like Stephen Stills, who helped out on his debut, Just as I Am. A Vietnam chant, "I Can't Write Left Handed," placed him further apart as a socially conscious performer. The accompanying album, Live at Carnegie Hall, makes clear Withers is about total commitment to the music and music alone. Once called "the poet Stax never had" by onetime producer Booker T., his influence on artists like Ben Harper and Erykah Badu is not to be taken lightly. Much of the above can be said about Making Music. Because of the regretful demise of Withers' original label, Sussex, his fifth album was released on Columbia. It possesses the same down-to-earthiness and eye for ordinary day life as his former releases, though the production sometimes trades the organic "feel" for the familiar "end of the '70s slickness." He's excused since at least he didn't turn disco! No dancing across the floor for Bill: friends and family is what remains important to him, as becomes evident from the portrait on the album cover's backside and in songs like "Family Table" and "Don't You Want to Stay." Even when a song does not seem to have a subject but itself ("Sometimes a Song"), Withers and band deliver it with an urgency that would make Barry White shiver. To stay on the subject: instead of White wondering "what he's going to do with you," wouldn't you rather have Withers "Make Love to Your Mind"? ~ Quint Kik
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Funk - Released October 13, 1987 | Legacy Recordings

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Four years passed between 1983's embarrassing Electric Universe and their reunion album, Touch the World. Before the album's release, there was excitement as well as skepticism among Earth, Wind & Fire fans. Was EWF still capable of delivering a great album? And even if it was, how well would the album do in an R&B market that was radically different than that of the 1970s? As it turned out, a lot of the old magic was still there, and Maurice White and Philip Bailey proved that they could still be a powerful combination. From "Evil Roy" (which describes an urban youth's life of crime) to the major hit "System of Survival," Touch the World proved that EWF was still quite capable of excellence. Though White doesn't shy away from technology, he uses it in an organic fashion and remains faithful to the outfit's rich history. Despite "System of Survival"'s success, the album wasn't the huge commercial hit it deserved to be, but it wasn't a bomb either. ~ Alex Henderson
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R&B/Soul - Released July 14, 2009 | Legacy Recordings

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R&B - Released February 21, 2014 | Legacy Recordings

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When the Girls' Girl Talk came out in 1984, Prince's Minneapolis sound was huge. R&B was full of Prince and Time imitators, and many artists reasoned that an easy way to score a quick hit was to be as Minneapolis-sounding as possible. But not every Minneapolis-style recording that came out in 1984 was successful, Girl Talk, in fact, received very little attention. Despite the fact that Prince associate André Cymone produced this album and wrote or co-wrote all of the material, Girl Talk fell through the cracks. Nonetheless, this isn't a terrible record. Although the material tends to be derivative and not very original, Cymone comes up with some catchy synth-funk and new wave grooves here and there. Obviously, Cymone modeled the female trio after Vanity 6/Apollonia 6, it's impossible not to think of Vanity and Apollonia when you're listening to R-rated synth-funk ditties like "S-E-S-E-X," "Girl Talk," and the single "Don't Waste My Time" or the pop/rock/new wave numbers "Nu Boy" and "My Man." Again, Girl Talk won't win any awards for originality, but it has its moments. ~ Alex Henderson
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R&B - Released November 28, 2014 | Legacy Recordings

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R&B - Released November 28, 2014 | Legacy Recordings

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In 1978, Gladys Knight & the Pips recorded one album as a group in addition to doing some recording separately. That year, Knight provided her first solo album, Miss Gladys Knight, for Buddah/Arista, while the Pips recorded Callin' (their second album without her) for Casablanca. And together, they recorded The One and Only, which didn't go down in history as one of their all-time classics but is a generally pleasant, if unspectacular, soul-pop outing. This LP finds the quartet working with various producers, including Michael Masser, Richie Wise, Tony Camillo, and the Van McCoy/Charles Kipps team. The album's best-known offering is the disco-flavored single "It's a Better Than Good Time," which Knight also recorded as a solo artist in 1978. Other decent tracks range from the vibrant "Come Back and Finish What You Started" (written by McCoy/Kipps) to the ballad "What If I Should Ever Need You" and the exuberant, gospel-minded "Saved By the Grace of Your Love." Nothing on The One and Only is in a class with "Midnight Train to Georgia" or "I Feel a Song (In My Heart)," but none of the material is bad either. Although not essential and not recommended to casual listeners, The One and Only is worth hearing if you're among Gladys Knight & the Pips' die-hard fans. ~ Alex Henderson

R&B - Released March 28, 2014 | Legacy Recordings

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R&B - Released February 17, 2015 | Legacy Recordings

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