Thanks to the hard work carried out in cooperation with recording studios as well as an increasing number of music labels (Plus Loin Music, Bee Jazz, Ambronay Editions, Zig Zag Territoires, ECM, Mirare, Aeolus, Ondine, Winter & Winter, Laborie, etc.), Qobuz now offers a rapidly-growing selection of new releases and back catalogue records in 24-bit HD quality. These albums reproduce exactly the sound from the studio recording, and offer a more comfortable listening experience that exceeds the sound quality of a CD (typically \"reduced\" for mastering at 44.1kHz/16-bit). \"Qobuz HD\" files are DRM-free and are 100% compatible with both Mac and PC. Moving away from the MP3-focused approach that has evolved over recent years at the expense of sound quality, Qobuz provides the sound calibre expected by all music lovers, allowing them to enjoy both the convenience and quality of online music.

Note 24-bit HD albums sold by Qobuz are created by our labels directly. They are not re-encoded using SACD and we guarantee their direct source. In order to continue on this path, we prohibit any tampering with the product.

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R&B - Released December 14, 2018 | Not specified

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R&B - Released October 12, 2018 | 10 Summers - Interscope PS

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R&B - Released October 12, 2018 | 10 Summers - Interscope PS

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The self-titled debut album from British R&B artist Ella Mai follows a slew of singles. Featuring production from the likes of DJ Mustard, Kosine, Lido, and H*Money, the album sees Mai deliver a collection of contemporary R&B tracks while taking inspiration from the sounds of early-'90s R&B and pop. ~ Rich Wilson
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R&B - Released June 3, 2016 | ByStorm Entertainment - RCA Records

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R&B - Released May 27, 2016 | ByStorm Entertainment - RCA Records

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Ro James is unique in that he was among the few R&B artists to release a major-label debut album during the first half of 2016. Even if his peers had amounted to far more than BJ the Chicago Kid, Gallant, Drake associates, and Drake knock-offs, he would have stood out in his field. Like BJ, James sounds like an adult, not an adolescent, who came up in the church and is equipped with a judiciously utilized falsetto. The two singers likewise come across as easy-to-like gentlemen with bad-boy streaks. Apart from a subtle Willie Hutch sample, however, there are no retro-soul moves on El Dorado, an album that is predominantly sleek and synthesized, wholly contemporary. Refreshingly, there are no guest vocalists or rappers, leaving the spotlight to focus squarely on James, whose levels of confidence and charm are high enough to withstand woman-as-vehicle metaphors and a litany of de rigueur weed and alcohol references. In "Permission," he provides an antidote to the abundance of self-entitled slow jams permeating airwaves, preceding the smoothly delivered "Come on, gimme that green light" with "With your permission" and further expressing respect for his partner with "...only if it feels right." This is an encouraging debut that hints at increasingly distinctive works ahead. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released February 19, 2016 | Motown (Capitol)

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R&B - Released February 19, 2016 | Motown (Capitol)

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R&B - Released October 2, 2015 | Epic - Streamline Records

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Tamar Braxton's return to music in 2013 could not have gone much better. Love and War debuted at number two, featured a number one R&B hit and two additional singles that either scraped or peaked near the Top Ten. Three Grammy nominations resulted. Follow-up Calling All Lovers is wrapped up like it offers even more theatrics. Braxton isn't smiling in any of the photos contained in the booklet, which is made to look like a newspaper titled Tamartian Times. (Braxtonian Beacon was likely never considered; "Tamartian" is a nod to her followers). The album starts in scattered fashion with some neo-reggae, a retro-modern midtempo groove that evokes breakbeat-driven early-'90s productions, and a church-ified ballad. After those three songs, the album stabilizes, sliding between a number of plush ballads and sophisticated but bumping slow jams. Heartache prevails during the first half and crests with "Never," an authoritative and elegantly paced kiss-off of an inappreciative lover. The latter half is mostly about devotion and awe, while the back-to-back "Love It" (all booming bass, tapping keyboards, and rattling percussion) and "Must Be Good to You" (light and springy disco-funk) turn it up several degrees with Braxton offering firm declarations of her sexual power. Calling All Lovers doesn't merely offer more than what its packaging suggests. It might not feature a single as big as "Love and War," but it tops that song's parent album. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released October 2, 2015 | Epic - Streamline Records

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Tamar Braxton's return to music in 2013 could not have gone much better. Love and War debuted at number two, featured a number one R&B hit and two additional singles that either scraped or peaked near the Top Ten. Three Grammy nominations resulted. Follow-up Calling All Lovers is wrapped up like it offers even more theatrics. Braxton isn't smiling in any of the photos contained in the booklet, which is made to look like a newspaper titled Tamartian Times. (Braxtonian Beacon was likely never considered; "Tamartian" is a nod to her followers). The album starts in scattered fashion with some neo-reggae, a retro-modern midtempo groove that evokes breakbeat-driven early-'90s productions, and a church-ified ballad. After those three songs, the album stabilizes, sliding between a number of plush ballads and sophisticated but bumping slow jams. Heartache prevails during the first half and crests with "Never," an authoritative and elegantly paced kiss-off of an inappreciative lover. The latter half is mostly about devotion and awe, while the back-to-back "Love It" (all booming bass, tapping keyboards, and rattling percussion) and "Must Be Good to You" (light and springy disco-funk) turn it up several degrees with Braxton offering firm declarations of her sexual power. Calling All Lovers doesn't merely offer more than what its packaging suggests. It might not feature a single as big as "Love and War," but it tops that song's parent album. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released January 9, 2015 | RCA Records Label

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Love Me Back wasn't quite two months old when Jazmine Sullivan, a singer's singer and songwriter's songwriter, tweeted that she was going to take an indefinite break from music. She noted that a lack of self-belief was a reason. Four years later, after she duetted with fellow under-recognized titan Bilal on Robert Glasper Experiment's Black Radio 2, took part in a documentary web series (in which Beyoncé gushed that Sullivan is "one of the best"), and issued three singles, she made her full return with Reality Show. Heated march "Dumb," defeated rustic ballad "Forever Don't Last," and trenchant slow jam "Mascara," that trio of pre-album A-sides, effectively indicated that the album would be different yet characteristically multitudinous. What's most noticeable about Reality Show is that Sullivan utilizes her in-the-red wail only sparingly. She diversifies her vocal approaches and sings more frequently with swagger. One moment, over a Chuck Harmony production that sounds like a prelude to a crime scene in a gangster flick, she boasts about the .45 in her purse and willing-to-kill support for her man. In another, she delivers a droning, steely warning to a lame lover over synthetic disco courtesy of da Internz (hear also: Annie's "The Greatest Hit," Patrice Rushen's "Forget Me Nots"). As in that highlight, Sullivan's throwback moments here tend not to go as far back in time; blissful, liquid slow jam "Let It Burn," as another example, borrows from After 7's "Ready or Not." Altogether, the contributions of long-term Sullivan associates like Harmony, Salaam Remi, and Ant Bell, along with those from Key Wane and JoeLogic & Dilemma, give the album a relatively contemporary feel. Just as potent and lasting as Fearless and Love Me Back, Reality Show completes one of the most impressive first-three-album runs. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released January 9, 2015 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released August 11, 2014 | Atlantic Records

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R&B - Released July 1, 2014 | Atlantic Records

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R&B - Released July 1, 2014 | Atlantic Records

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R&B - Released September 3, 2013 | Epic - Streamline Records

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Not too many R&B artists experience a 13-year gap between debuting and releasing a second album, but here's Tamar Braxton, now known to a younger generation due to her presence on reality television series Braxton Family Values and talk show The Real. Dramatic, spacious ballad "Love and War," released in late 2012, kicked her music career backed into gear and put her in the Top 15 of Billboard's R&B chart. Second single "The One," the umpteenth track to sample Mtume's "Juicy Fruit," signaled that Braxton was up to compete with contemporary singers who emerged during the middle and late 2000s. Indeed, Love and War plays out like it's designed to contend with the likes of Ciara, Rihanna, Trey Songz, and maybe even Keyshia Cole, rather than those who came up around the same time as Braxton. Slower, more atmospheric productions like "Stay and Fight," "All the Way Home," and "Sound of Love" suit her the best and display her considerable skill -- by now, given some of the artists who have come and gone since 2000, she should have at least four albums in her past. The lighthearted numbers -- like the Keri Hilson castoff-level "Tip Toe," the mind-numbing "Hot Sugar," and the Mike Will knockoff strip-club track "She Did That" -- are no match for the fully formed songs that seem rooted in Braxton's life experiences. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released August 30, 2013 | G.O.O.D. Music - Columbia

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R&B - Released August 30, 2013 | G.O.O.D. Music - Columbia

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