Thanks to the hard work carried out in cooperation with recording studios as well as an increasing number of music labels (Plus Loin Music, Bee Jazz, Ambronay Editions, Zig Zag Territoires, ECM, Mirare, Aeolus, Ondine, Winter & Winter, Laborie, etc.), Qobuz now offers a rapidly-growing selection of new releases and back catalogue records in 24-bit HD quality. These albums reproduce exactly the sound from the studio recording, and offer a more comfortable listening experience that exceeds the sound quality of a CD (typically \"reduced\" for mastering at 44.1kHz/16-bit). \"Qobuz HD\" files are DRM-free and are 100% compatible with both Mac and PC. Moving away from the MP3-focused approach that has evolved over recent years at the expense of sound quality, Qobuz provides the sound calibre expected by all music lovers, allowing them to enjoy both the convenience and quality of online music.

Note 24-bit HD albums sold by Qobuz are created by our labels directly. They are not re-encoded using SACD and we guarantee their direct source. In order to continue on this path, we prohibit any tampering with the product.

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R&B - Released November 2, 2018 | MBK Entertainment - RCA Records

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R&B - Released October 26, 2018 | Def Jam Recordings. - Atlantic Recording Corporation

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R&B - Released October 26, 2018 | Def Jam Recordings. - Atlantic Recording Corporation

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R&B - Released October 12, 2018 | 10 Summers - Interscope PS

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R&B - Released October 12, 2018 | 10 Summers - Interscope PS

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The self-titled debut album from British R&B artist Ella Mai follows a slew of singles. Featuring production from the likes of DJ Mustard, Kosine, Lido, and H*Money, the album sees Mai deliver a collection of contemporary R&B tracks while taking inspiration from the sounds of early-'90s R&B and pop. ~ Rich Wilson
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R&B - Released June 8, 2018 | Motown (Capitol)

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R&B - Released June 8, 2018 | Motown (Capitol)

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That only one major hit originated on 2015's Non-Fiction had more to do with the state of mainstream urban radio than it did with Ne-Yo's dwindling ability to craft appealing songs. While the follow-up involves the significantly younger likes of PartyNextDoor, Bebe Rexha, and Stefflon Don with playlist-bid production touches to match, it's mostly business as usual for Ne-Yo. He largely persists with his tried-and-true songwriting approach, detailing various scenes from a monogamous relationship while saving room for a few moments with low-key, high-class celebrations in mind. Not one song is poor, but few stand out. Most notably, there's "U Deserve," a spacious slow jam, and the PartyNextDoor-assisted "On Ur Mind," a sweet midtempo number. Much of the remaining songs blur into one another, lacking distinction and resembling leftovers from Non-Fiction, another lengthy set with a very similar cast of producers (including Cirkut, Dr. Luke, Darhyl Camper, Stacey Owens, and Stargate). Adding some confusion to the mix is the absence of the sublime ballad "Earn Ur Love" and the Leon Sylvers/Whispers-flavored groove "Another Love Song," both of which were released in 2017. Swapping out a half-dozen samey cuts for those two would greatly improve the album, which is unsatisfactory by Ne-Yo's standard, not that of his genre in 2018. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released June 8, 2018 | Motown (Capitol)

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R&B - Released June 8, 2018 | Motown (Capitol)

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That only one major hit originated on 2015's Non-Fiction had more to do with the state of mainstream urban radio than it did with Ne-Yo's dwindling ability to craft appealing songs. While the follow-up involves the significantly younger likes of PartyNextDoor, Bebe Rexha, and Stefflon Don with playlist-bid production touches to match, it's mostly business as usual for Ne-Yo. He largely persists with his tried-and-true songwriting approach, detailing various scenes from a monogamous relationship while saving room for a few moments with low-key, high-class celebrations in mind. Not one song is poor, but few stand out. Most notably, there's "U Deserve," a spacious slow jam, and the PartyNextDoor-assisted "On Ur Mind," a sweet midtempo number. Much of the remaining songs blur into one another, lacking distinction and resembling leftovers from Non-Fiction, another lengthy set with a very similar cast of producers (including Cirkut, Dr. Luke, Darhyl Camper, Stacey Owens, and Stargate). Adding some confusion to the mix is the absence of the sublime ballad "Earn Ur Love" and the Leon Sylvers/Whispers-flavored groove "Another Love Song," both of which were released in 2017. Swapping out a half-dozen samey cuts for those two would greatly improve the album, which is unsatisfactory by Ne-Yo's standard, not that of his genre in 2018. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released June 1, 2018 | Motown (Capitol)

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R&B - Released May 11, 2018 | Motown (Capitol)

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R&B - Released April 13, 2018 | RCA Records Label

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There was a point before the release of Joyride when the trajectory of Tinashe's music career appeared to be tracing that of Cassie. Tinashe had the platinum debut single with "2 On," a solid parent album, and waning momentum after relatively minor chart success with the follow-up singles. The situation worsened as the arrival of Joyride was delayed and a tour was consequently scrapped. By the time RCA matched Tinashe with labelmate Chris Brown for a non-album single in 2015 -- the year she planned to release Joyride -- it was evident that the singer and her label weren't on the same page. Two more years passed, during which Tinashe offered the stopgap commercial mixtape Nightride. A third and final version of Joyride was finally completed and released in April 2018. Remarkably, it bears no signs of a tough birth, even with the knowledge that the lead song -- the title track -- had been sold to Rihanna, unbeknown to Tinashe, who eventually bought it back. Sung in a lower register with a slightly devilish lilt, and further distinguished by Hit-Boy's slightly abrasive drums, "Joyride" simultaneously sounds like a fit for Rihanna and a striking way for Tinashe to begin her second proper album. The track ends with strings to neatly segue into the trap-styled "No Drama," where she takes a quick jab at those who have belittled her. It's one of two collaborations with Stargate, the lone full-track production holdovers from Aquarius. The other one, the bounding, bittersweet "Faded Love," features Future. Apart from the presence of those figures and some fleeting sourness, Tinashe keeps it moving with new studio support and another batch of compositions that cover romantic highs and lows. There are some missteps -- a tropical-flavored pop number that sounds a couple years late and easily forgettable, and the usage of grating bed-spring squeaks throughout the otherwise fine "Ooh La La." Nothing here is bound to pass "2 On" in terms of popularity, but the highlights are filled with rich details and seductive hooks, heard at full power on the slow jams "He Don't Want It" and "No Contest." The smoldering, slightly bluesy "Salt" and sweetly aching piano ballad "Fires and Flames" -- two additional highlights -- invalidate all claims that Tinashe is one-dimensional. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released April 13, 2018 | RCA Records Label

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There was a point before the release of Joyride when the trajectory of Tinashe's music career appeared to be tracing that of Cassie. Tinashe had the platinum debut single with "2 On," a solid parent album, and waning momentum after relatively minor chart success with the follow-up singles. The situation worsened as the arrival of Joyride was delayed and a tour was consequently scrapped. By the time RCA matched Tinashe with labelmate Chris Brown for a non-album single in 2015 -- the year she planned to release Joyride -- it was evident that the singer and her label weren't on the same page. Two more years passed, during which Tinashe offered the stopgap commercial mixtape Nightride. A third and final version of Joyride was finally completed and released in April 2018. Remarkably, it bears no signs of a tough birth, even with the knowledge that the lead song -- the title track -- had been sold to Rihanna, unbeknown to Tinashe, who eventually bought it back. Sung in a lower register with a slightly devilish lilt, and further distinguished by Hit-Boy's slightly abrasive drums, "Joyride" simultaneously sounds like a fit for Rihanna and a striking way for Tinashe to begin her second proper album. The track ends with strings to neatly segue into the trap-styled "No Drama," where she takes a quick jab at those who have belittled her. It's one of two collaborations with Stargate, the lone full-track production holdovers from Aquarius. The other one, the bounding, bittersweet "Faded Love," features Future. Apart from the presence of those figures and some fleeting sourness, Tinashe keeps it moving with new studio support and another batch of compositions that cover romantic highs and lows. There are some missteps -- a tropical-flavored pop number that sounds a couple years late and easily forgettable, and the usage of grating bed-spring squeaks throughout the otherwise fine "Ooh La La." Nothing here is bound to pass "2 On" in terms of popularity, but the highlights are filled with rich details and seductive hooks, heard at full power on the slow jams "He Don't Want It" and "No Contest." The smoldering, slightly bluesy "Salt" and sweetly aching piano ballad "Fires and Flames" -- two additional highlights -- invalidate all claims that Tinashe is one-dimensional. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released March 30, 2018 | Motown (Capitol)

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R&B - Released March 23, 2018 | Def Jam Recordings

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Is this Toni Braxton's revenge? At 50 years of age, the 1990s R&B star (with more than 25 million sales of her first two albums, the self-titled Toni Braxton in 1993 and Secrets in 1996) is bringing back fond memories for aficionados of sugary, languorous groove, with a rather sober album, lovingly made, and which never falls into either over-exuberance or self-parody. Above all, this is a work for its times (2018) and it has taken a few steps away from the sounds of the 1990s. Braxton is now a mature woman, facing both her present and her past head-on. Four years after Love, Marriage & Divorce, a duo with Babyface, Sex & Cigarettes marks a return to serious business. For her first album since 2010's Pulse, she has brought even more to the table than usual. "“I feel like I’m older, I wanna say what I feel. I don’t wanna be censored.” The message is loud and clear (just take a look at the lyrics on adultery) and it shows that Toni Braxton is far from finished… © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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R&B - Released March 23, 2018 | Def Jam Recordings

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As her 1993 blockbuster debut approached its 25th anniversary, Toni Braxton proceeded to collect accolades while moving forward. Her duets album with Babyface was designated Best R&B Album in 2015 by the Recording Academy -- making her a Grammy winner in three decades -- and the connection with her foundational audience was reaffirmed in 2017 with a Soul Train Legend Award. Her every-few-years release schedule was maintained with this short album, in which she responds to a habitually philandering lover with her distinctive mix of fire and finesse. This has more of the former element than any previous Braxton release. Although the title track is placed second in the sequence, it's really the first scene, or at least the album's basis, an emotionally raw if composed confrontation supported by piano and strings. "I guess you're too cold or too bold to give a fuck," she remarks with a sting. "FOH," one of two Babyface collaborations, is far more explicit, with jealousy and contempt at a boiling point. Only "Missin'," the closing song on the standard edition, deviates from the rough story line, and that's for its lack of sourness; it's built on a light galloping rhythm yet is all about longing, merely one form of emotional engulfment displayed by the singer. There's also a hint of reflective sweetness to "Long as I Live," but the ache is incurable, and the Colbie Caillat collaboration "My Heart" glistens but is otherwise drained. Elsewhere, Braxton alternates between regret and admitting romantic dependency. The productions, typically polished for a Braxton album, are subtly diverse, with "Deadwood" easily adaptable to contemporary country, "Sorry" rooted in classic Southern soul, and "Missin'" verging on tropical pop. Non-standard edition bonus track "Forgiven," a ballad of closure, would make much more sense as this album's finale than it does in its original state, as the backdrop for the credits sequence of Roland Joffé's The Forgiven. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released February 8, 2018 | Motown (Capitol)

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R&B - Released December 15, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released December 13, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released December 1, 2017 | ByStorm Entertainment - RCA Records

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When Miguel lamented inequality and its manifestations on the closing track of Kaleidoscope Dream, it seemed forced, heartfelt as it was, like the singer was reaching to display some depth. It didn't help that the penultimate number was "Pussy Is Mine." After the sleazier Wildheart, his second Top Five album, human rights issues naturally fueled Miguel's writing to a greater extent, as heard on War & Leisure. Although direct references to various intensifying issues are saved for the sparse finale "Now" -- in which police brutality, immigration, polluted water, and inadequate disaster relief all get time -- the majority of these songs are at least loosely inspired by the distressed climate. Miguel sings of being a vigilante and rebel, of "terror on her mind," and Korean missiles. Some references to his own armament aren't metaphorical. Space made for not one but two of the six featured guests, Rick Ross and J. Cole, is filled with nods to Colin Kaepernick. And then there's the buzzing, clomping "City of Angels," drawn from the perspective of an unfaithful lover who was out of town, caught up in a fling, while his woman was victimized by a ruinous attack on Los Angeles. For all the conflict imagery, War & Leisure is often brightly colored, even upbeat. Best of all is "Pineapple Skies," a joyous tropical escape and a rare modern R&B love song that illustrates a blooming relationship pre-consummation ("I ain't kissed you yet"). Close to that is the ecstatic, delightfully off-center "Told You So," expressed with a similar sense of optimism ("I don't wanna control you, I'm gonna set you free"). Smut does remain in supply. "Caramelo Duro" churns and grinds like nothing else in Miguel's catalog. He wants to "fuck all night" in "Come Through and Chill," a song with other signs that it was written while his songwriting faculties were somewhat compromised ("Hello stranger, vape's been waiting/And just as I recall, that ass is still amazing"). In another lusty cut, he's some kind of polyamorous cult leader. It all goes down easy with undeniable charm and sinuous hooks to spare. That yearning howl is in full effect too. ~ Andy Kellman