Thanks to the hard work carried out in cooperation with recording studios as well as an increasing number of music labels (Plus Loin Music, Bee Jazz, Ambronay Editions, Zig Zag Territoires, ECM, Mirare, Aeolus, Ondine, Winter & Winter, Laborie, etc.), Qobuz now offers a rapidly-growing selection of new releases and back catalogue records in 24-bit HD quality. These albums reproduce exactly the sound from the studio recording, and offer a more comfortable listening experience that exceeds the sound quality of a CD (typically \"reduced\" for mastering at 44.1kHz/16-bit). \"Qobuz HD\" files are DRM-free and are 100% compatible with both Mac and PC. Moving away from the MP3-focused approach that has evolved over recent years at the expense of sound quality, Qobuz provides the sound calibre expected by all music lovers, allowing them to enjoy both the convenience and quality of online music.

Note 24-bit HD albums sold by Qobuz are created by our labels directly. They are not re-encoded using SACD and we guarantee their direct source. In order to continue on this path, we prohibit any tampering with the product.

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R&B - Released February 5, 2019 | Atlantic Records

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R&B - Released February 3, 2019 | Atlantic Records

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R&B - Released October 26, 2018 | Def Jam Recordings. - Atlantic Recording Corporation

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R&B - Released October 26, 2018 | Def Jam Recordings. - Atlantic Recording Corporation

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R&B - Released October 12, 2018 | 10 Summers - Interscope PS

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R&B - Released October 12, 2018 | 10 Summers - Interscope PS

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The self-titled debut album from British R&B artist Ella Mai follows a slew of singles. Featuring production from the likes of DJ Mustard, Kosine, Lido, and H*Money, the album sees Mai deliver a collection of contemporary R&B tracks while taking inspiration from the sounds of early-'90s R&B and pop. ~ Rich Wilson
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R&B - Released June 15, 2018 | Republic Records

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The official full-length debut of rapper, soulster, songwriter, and sampler Jacquees, 4275 was named for the house number of his childhood home. It seems a fitting title for a record that looks back to '90s R&B touchstones for its foundation, then fleshes out its yearning melodies with full-frontal lyrics inspired by experiences from his time living there. With appearances by the likes of Birdman, Chris Brown, Trey Songz, and Young Thug, the album debuted at number 35 on the Billboard 200. ~ Marcy Donelson
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R&B - Released June 15, 2018 | Republic Records

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R&B - Released December 15, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released December 13, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released October 31, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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After Royalty was released toward the end of 2015, Chris Brown's market saturation strategy continued to play out and occasionally pay off. During the next two years, he was featured on roughly two-dozen tracks, including DJ Khaled's "Do You Mind," and let loose a glut of headlining singles that led to his eighth solo full-length. Termed a double album, Heartbreak on a Full Moon indeed fits on two CDs, but the track count is equal to that of the singer's three previous solo albums combined. This abundance is a scheme to exploit the "consumption"-oriented data that drives chart placements. Unlike most double albums, there's no concept here, and no attempt was made to separate the material into themes -- perhaps for the better, so as to not add another layer of gimmickry. It's artistically conservative, at least by Brown's standards, covering his regular circuit of trap-styled slow jams, skeletal ballads, and brighter pop-oriented numbers, with the mood often swinging from playboy-hedonistic to sweet-romantic to scorned-acidic, sometimes within one track. The stand-outs are enough to make for a 45-minute listen that surpasses his previous album, and clearing out the tracks on which Brown's tenor slips from pleading to whining makes it easier to reach them with convenience. Beneath better singles such as "Questions" (a dancehall-pop number cleverly referencing Kevin Lyttle's "Turn Me On"), "High End" (a sleek, almost ambient cut with Young Thug and Future), and "Confidence" (possibly Brown's most winsome song since Exclusive), there's some depth, though it does require sifting. Among the better deep cuts is "Yellow Tape." A lurid rumination on the downside of fame, its foreboding hook has a lingering effect lasts almost as long as the album itself. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released October 31, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released January 22, 2016 | R&B Money - Atlantic Records

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Tank's seventh album is presented as a sequel to his third one. Released in 2007, Sex Love & Pain debuted at number two on the Billboard 200, was his second album to top the R&B chart, and received a Grammy nomination. When albums are connected to past triumphs, they tend to be last-gasp attempts at regaining relevance, but the singer hadn't experienced a commercial decline prior to the release of Sex Love Pain & II. B.A.M. and Tank, rather than primary Sex Love & Pain collaborators the Underdogs, produced most of these tracks, so this is no nostalgia trip. While there are some instances where Tank is either longing for his woman or seeking repentance, the bulk of the album regards its title's first word. Tank's armed with another bunch of sleek slow-jam productions to complement his libidinous verses and, more than ever, his name is representative of his lyrical subtlety as much as his build ("Make your face my chair, leaking everywhere," etc.). He's still targeting teen and young adult listeners with material that falls in line with commercial R&B radio playlists. On "#BDAY," which features three guests who range from 12 to 17 years younger than him, he declares "I just want to help you celebrate," then offers a series of directions that includes "Put them candles down and get to the cake" and "Show me that it's real." "Relationship Goals," featuring one of the album's better slinking productions, is as single-minded, though it's more about giving than "BDAY," with "How about we start with my tongue from the waist down?" and promises to "beat it up." Tank's voice is as strong as ever. The repetition of the largely unimaginative lyrics and number of indistinct productions, however, make the album verge on monotony. This is not among his better, more imaginative releases. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released December 18, 2015 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released December 18, 2015 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released December 18, 2015 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released December 18, 2015 | RCA Records Label

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In June 2015, once the Tyga collaboration Fan of a Fan: The Album had run its course, Chris Brown released the first single from his seventh proper album. Woozy ballad "Liquor," with its hook of "All I wanna do is drink and fuck, drink, drink, and fuck," was not atypical for him. The title and cover of its parent album, however, once publicized, seemed to signal a potential shift farther away from the carousing and belligerence that have dominated his work since Exclusive. Named after his daughter, and with an endearing portrait that features her on the front, Royalty nonetheless is designed more to please Brown's devout fans than illustrate growth. It begins with a song titled "Back to Sleep," a lullaby of sorts, but it's definitely not for his daughter, and the majority of what follows is a qualitative step back from previous solo album X. Brown doubles down on his swashbuckling persona, boasting "I'm a champagne-pourin' n*gga, I like big asses and tits" and "You know I don't love 'em, and you know I don't cuff 'em," and imploring "Can I stick it in a little bit/Don't be shy, just a little bit." Second single "Zero," a disco-funk throwback replete with talkbox, is as spiteful as anything else in the Chris Brown catalog, where the singer scoffs, "You think I'm thinkin' 'bout your ass?" There's some irony in writing, recording, and releasing a song bragging about not thinking of an ex. With rare exception, Brown keeps it explicit, focused on flaunting. Some of the slow jams, like the Keith Sweat-referencing "Who's Gonna (Nobody)" and Jodeci-referencing "Proof," are built on slinking productions that rate with the best of mid-2010s pop-R&B. Brown has been behind so much X-rated material that, when he keeps it clean, as he does throughout "Make Love," the effect is jarring. Did someone doctor the recording without Brown's knowledge? Indeed, a more representative title for the album would have been that of the 13th track, "No Filter." That phrase reflects his personality and perhaps his quality control. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released December 11, 2015 | Def Jam Recordings

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Counting the front cover, the booklet for This Thing Called Life contains over two-dozen photos, all black-and-white, mostly downcast. In a couple shots, August Alsina's view is from the ground, at the mercy of an ambiguously clothed man pointing a gun at him. Others show the singer staring at a shattered RIAA plaque for "I Luv This Sh*t," his platinum debut single. Only in the last two is he shown cracking a smile. Altogether, the images closely reflect the percentages of dark and light content that color Alsina's second album. "I done worked my way to the top," he proudly asserts, yet those who prop him up are treated with as much suspicion as those who attempt to knock him down. Success has exacerbated previously existing problems while dealing him a set of new ones. In one verse, for instance, he laments, "I try to buy my momma's love, she don't appreciate it, so I stay inebriated," while in another, he smacks down prospective hangers-on. As with the Downtown: Life Under the Gun EP and Testimony, most of the highlights here involve production from the Exclusives and Knucklehead. "Dreamer," strengthened by a sample of a Eugene Record ballad, shows Alsina spinning realist tales with as much conviction displayed in inward-looking highlights like "Song Cry" and "Hip Hop." Even though Alsina is a soul singer to his core, he continually draws connections to hip-hop, borrowing a song title from Jay-Z, interpolating Naughty by Nature, referencing 2Pac and the Notorious B.I.G. Given the album's immersion in street life and its grim aftershocks -- details ranging from hunger pains to the contemplation of suicide -- it's gratifying to hear it conclude with a sentiment similar to that of the booklet's last page. In the Polow-produced "The Encore," a Ralfi Pagan-sampling throwback anthem with a touch of gospel, Alsina concludes with "Had to get it how I could, I was so misunderstood out the hood, now it's all good." Its respite is much more substantive than what's served in the hedonistic singles that feature Lil Wayne and Chris Brown. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released December 11, 2015 | Def Jam Recordings

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R&B - Released July 17, 2015 | Atlantic Records

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