Thanks to the hard work carried out in cooperation with recording studios as well as an increasing number of music labels (Plus Loin Music, Bee Jazz, Ambronay Editions, Zig Zag Territoires, ECM, Mirare, Aeolus, Ondine, Winter & Winter, Laborie, etc.), Qobuz now offers a rapidly-growing selection of new releases and back catalogue records in 24-bit HD quality. These albums reproduce exactly the sound from the studio recording, and offer a more comfortable listening experience that exceeds the sound quality of a CD (typically \"reduced\" for mastering at 44.1kHz/16-bit). \"Qobuz HD\" files are DRM-free and are 100% compatible with both Mac and PC. Moving away from the MP3-focused approach that has evolved over recent years at the expense of sound quality, Qobuz provides the sound calibre expected by all music lovers, allowing them to enjoy both the convenience and quality of online music.

Note 24-bit HD albums sold by Qobuz are created by our labels directly. They are not re-encoded using SACD and we guarantee their direct source. In order to continue on this path, we prohibit any tampering with the product.

$14.99
$9.99

Funk - Released November 30, 2018 | Freestyle Records

Hi-Res

R&B - Released January 19, 2018 | Germania music GmbH

Download not available
$20.99
$17.99

Soul - Released March 6, 1970 | UNI - MOTOWN

Hi-Res
$20.99
$17.99

Soul - Released June 1, 1966 | UNI - MOTOWN

Hi-Res
$20.99
$17.99

Soul - Released January 1, 1970 | UNI - MOTOWN

Hi-Res
$20.99
$17.99

Soul - Released July 1, 1972 | UNI - MOTOWN

Hi-Res
$20.99
$17.99

Soul - Released October 30, 1970 | UNI - MOTOWN

Hi-Res
$14.99
$12.99

Soul - Released October 30, 1970 | UNI - MOTOWN

Hi-Res
$22.49
$18.49

R&B - Released November 28, 2014 | Legacy Recordings

Hi-Res
You could say that In the Beginning is a reissue of a reissue. In 1968, Bell set out to cash in on the popularity of Gladys Knight & the Pips' Motown smashes by assembling Tastiest Hits, a collection of their pre-Motown work. Tastiest Hits went out of print after a few years, but in 1974, Bell reissued the collection as In the Beginning. Although the cover was different, Bell provided the same 11 songs in the same order and kept the liner notes that radio man Enoch Gregory had provided in 1968. In the Beginning was sold as a budget LP; the record went for around $2-3 in 1974, and that wasn't a bad deal because most the selections are excellent. "Every Beat of My Heart," "Operator," "Giving Up," "Lovers Always Forgive," and "Letter Full of Tears" are all essential examples of Gladys Knight & the Pips' pre-Motown period. In fact, their version of Johnny Otis' "Every Beat of My Heart" was their first major hit. And even the songs that fall short of essential are highly appealing. In 1974, In the Beginning was a very affordable and attractive way to get acquainted with the work that Gladys Knight & the Pips did before Berry Gordy came into the picture. ~ Alex Henderson
$20.99
$17.99

Soul - Released January 1, 1977 | UNI - MOTOWN

Hi-Res
A nearly 80-minute live album from 1977, Live at the London Palladium effectively compresses most of Marvin Gaye's numerous career highlights, making it a wonderful retrospective of the justly mythologized soul singer's accomplishments. Almost everything is here that could be: his '60s hits, his duets, the best moments from What's Going On, a trio of highlights each from Let's Get It On and I Want You, and even a bonus studio track, the magnificent 12-minute disco-funk epic "Got to Give It Up." Gaye performs with a sense of exuberance no doubt fueled by the large, appreciative audience. Furthermore, his rapport with the audience becomes well apparent and welcome during "Come Get to This" and "Let's Get It On"; during this pair of back-to-back odes to sex, you can feel the sultry passion in his voice as his singing drifts close to moaning and his ad libbing approaches tasteful, amorous aural lovemaking. Yet as intimate as Gaye is while singing, he's undeniably uncomfortable when talking: just before beginning his medley of '60s hits, he stumbles over his mumbled words, confessing, "I'll tell you, I don't do this so good so, you know, I might just stop and go right into the song. I'm really nuts," before halting mid-sentence rather than rambling any longer. Another revealing moment comes just before the duet medley, when Marvin speaks pensively of Tammi Terrell -- after the audience applauds her name, he wistfully whispers, "Oh, she'd like that...for her I thank you." These subtle between-song moments prove revealing in retrospect, illustrating just how shaken Gaye is at this troubled point in his career. Listen carefully and you can sense the struggling instability that would erupt cathartically a year later with Hear, My Dear. In addition to being historically noteworthy, Live at the London Palladium also stands as the best and most readily available portrait of Gaye's live performances -- a far different and more intimate experience than his studio releases and one that every fan should experience. ~ Jason Birchmeier
$14.99
$12.99

Soul - Released January 1, 2014 | Motown

Hi-Res
Marvin Gaye has more than enough great music to make a superb box set, but the haphazard Marvin Gaye Collection isn't it. The four discs within the set are arranged thematically: one terrific disc of hits, one good disc of duets, one largely uninteresting disc of rarities, and one wildly uneven disc of ballads. By spreading out the material this way, Motown shortchanges Gaye's musical accomplishments; there is no sense of growth or innovation. Although many of the songs are wonderful, some of the selections are puzzling -- they seem to be chosen because they're arcane, not because they're significant. This very quality makes The Marvin Gaye Collection essential for his most devoted fans; however, most fans will find this box set disappointing. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$37.99
$32.99

R&B - Released January 1, 2012 | UNI - MOTOWN

Hi-Res
$14.99
$12.99

Soul - Released June 1, 1999 | UNI - MOTOWN

Hi-Res
The marvelous title track alone, with Eddie Kendricks gliding into the stratosphere, made this an instant winner. There were several fine songs that weren't hits, such as "Not Now, I'll Tell You Later" and "I've Been Good to You," and there sure wasn't anything wrong with powerhouse cuts like "Ain't Too Proud to Beg." The Temptations would score four straight number one hits in the mid-'60s, each one an unforgettable classic. ~ Ron Wynn
$9.99

Soul - Released June 15, 1998 | Arista

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
$14.99
$12.99

Soul - Released January 1, 1977 | UNI - MOTOWN

Hi-Res
A nearly 80-minute live album from 1977, Live at the London Palladium effectively compresses most of Marvin Gaye's numerous career highlights, making it a wonderful retrospective of the justly mythologized soul singer's accomplishments. Almost everything is here that could be: his '60s hits, his duets, the best moments from What's Going On, a trio of highlights each from Let's Get It On and I Want You, and even a bonus studio track, the magnificent 12-minute disco-funk epic "Got to Give It Up." Gaye performs with a sense of exuberance no doubt fueled by the large, appreciative audience. Furthermore, his rapport with the audience becomes well apparent and welcome during "Come Get to This" and "Let's Get It On"; during this pair of back-to-back odes to sex, you can feel the sultry passion in his voice as his singing drifts close to moaning and his ad libbing approaches tasteful, amorous aural lovemaking. Yet as intimate as Gaye is while singing, he's undeniably uncomfortable when talking: just before beginning his medley of '60s hits, he stumbles over his mumbled words, confessing, "I'll tell you, I don't do this so good so, you know, I might just stop and go right into the song. I'm really nuts," before halting mid-sentence rather than rambling any longer. Another revealing moment comes just before the duet medley, when Marvin speaks pensively of Tammi Terrell -- after the audience applauds her name, he wistfully whispers, "Oh, she'd like that...for her I thank you." These subtle between-song moments prove revealing in retrospect, illustrating just how shaken Gaye is at this troubled point in his career. Listen carefully and you can sense the struggling instability that would erupt cathartically a year later with Hear, My Dear. In addition to being historically noteworthy, Live at the London Palladium also stands as the best and most readily available portrait of Gaye's live performances -- a far different and more intimate experience than his studio releases and one that every fan should experience. ~ Jason Birchmeier
$14.99
$12.99

Soul - Released January 1, 1972 | UNI - MOTOWN

Hi-Res
$14.99
$12.99

Soul - Released March 6, 1970 | UNI - MOTOWN

Hi-Res