Thanks to the hard work carried out in cooperation with recording studios as well as an increasing number of music labels (Plus Loin Music, Bee Jazz, Ambronay Editions, Zig Zag Territoires, ECM, Mirare, Aeolus, Ondine, Winter & Winter, Laborie, etc.), Qobuz now offers a rapidly-growing selection of new releases and back catalogue records in 24-bit HD quality. These albums reproduce exactly the sound from the studio recording, and offer a more comfortable listening experience that exceeds the sound quality of a CD (typically \"reduced\" for mastering at 44.1kHz/16-bit). \"Qobuz HD\" files are DRM-free and are 100% compatible with both Mac and PC. Moving away from the MP3-focused approach that has evolved over recent years at the expense of sound quality, Qobuz provides the sound calibre expected by all music lovers, allowing them to enjoy both the convenience and quality of online music.

Note 24-bit HD albums sold by Qobuz are created by our labels directly. They are not re-encoded using SACD and we guarantee their direct source. In order to continue on this path, we prohibit any tampering with the product.

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Blues - Released March 30, 2018 | Anti - Epitaph

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Blues - Released June 15, 2018 | Silvertone

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Damn Right ! Who could disagree? Of course Buddy Guy has blues in the blood! The Chicago guitar legend is saying it loud on this album: The Blues Is Alive And Well! At 81 years old, he seems on better form than ever, and has a lot to teach the youth. This is a punkier, rockier bluesman than the present generation, who knows how to bring the blues to a white audience. Old fashioned? The accusation wouldn't offend Buddy Guy, who's just playing his guitar right. Here, the guitarist is discussing the blues with guests who have the stature to hold a conversation with him. Keith Richards and Mick Jagger of the Rolling Stones, Jeff Beck and James Bay feed his talent, and stay in perfect harmony with his genius. And what would be blues without talk of booze and old friends? On Cognac, Buddy Guy seems to shed twenty years when he evokes Muddy Waters. It's too late to sip a brandy with him, but now he's got Keith and others for company. Getting wasted in style, filling up on booze and the blues, dealing out a hand that can't ever end: that's the spirit of the blues. Beyond the music, there is a real discussion that starts between guitar riffs, piano chords and the singer's penetrating voice. Better than a trance, this is a stairway to the underworld opening up. And then there's such a captivating groove on The Blues Is Alive And Well. It's a grand declaration of love for the genre, which, through solitude, poverty and suffering, remains a faithful friend, a life-saver, an intimate journal. Perhaps the album should be seen as a kind of passing-onward of the blues to the generations to come. Blue No More gives a fair account of the idea. It's a duet where Buddy Guy is singing face-to-face with the Pearly Gates. It doesn't dampen his mood at all, through, because he knows that others down below will pick up his baton. And James Bay echoes his master's words back to him: "I won’t be blue no more". © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
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Blues - Released November 30, 2018 | Provogue

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Beth Hart commands the stage with just one click of her fingers! The Californian tigress is still as feisty as ever without getting caught up in the clichés. In this live performance recorded on May 4th 2018 in London’s most prestigious setting, the Royal Albert Hall, she sets up her very own cabaret mixing blues, jazz and vintage soul. A woman who honours Nina Simone, Howlin’ Wolf, Dinah Washington, Buddy Guy and so many other key personalities of rhythm’n’blues, she shows us the full extent of her talent during this two-hour show. With a microphone to hand or sat behind her piano, what impresses us most is Beth Hart’s ability to mix all her musical influences and produce one very personal cocktail. Her secret? Her voice, of course. A kind of unstoppable magnet that pulls every word, every sentence, every chorus and which is made even more powerful by her contact with the audience. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Blues - Released July 27, 2018 | Concord Records

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After Memphis in 2013 and A Fool To Care in 2015, Boz Scaggs concludes his trilogy on American roots music with Out of the Blues. Properly charged with southern blues and soul, here is a preview of the music that has inspired him throughout his career. With − at his side − talents such as Ray Parker, Jr. and Arc Angels’ leaders, Charlie Sexton and Doyle Bramhall II, as well as Willie Weeks (bass), Jim Keltner (drums) and Jim Cox (keyboards). Ideal conditions to bring old blues back to life… Over the nine tracks, four were composed by Jack 'Applejack' Walroth, Scaggs’ former teammate, most notably on Memphis. For the rest, the album features Don Robey’s I’ve Just Got To Forget You, Neil Young’s On The Beach, and Jimmy Read’s Down In Virginia. Boz Scaggs seems to be particularly at ease when it comes to soak in an entire era. Sixties soul is indeed a part of Those Lies, but quite modern at the same time. Some noticeable similarities with James Hunter at times, but the American singer sets himself apart thanks to his unique voice, cementing his status as a bluesman. Gritty guitars and muddy blues, the harmonica riffs unwearyingly travel back and forth America. © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
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Blues - Released February 23, 2018 | Concord Records, Inc. (UMG Account)

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The Perfecto leather jacket is worn out, the leggings are torn and the hand disappears in a likely wet head of hair. No deception here, Danielle Nicole is through and through in the image of her music. With Cry No More, this tiger doesn’t try to reinvent the wheel of blues’n’soul but rather to hypnotise the crowds with catchy choruses and carnivorous growls. It must be said that the blues notes started flowing through her veins when her girlfriends from the sandbox were still playing with Barbie dolls. In the Nicole family, all members sing and play music. That’s it. Growing up in Kansas City, Missouri, Danielle performed on stage for the first time at the young age of twelve, already glorifying like no other Koko Taylor’s Never Trust A Man. Four years later, she was the lead singer in her father’s band, Little Eva and the Works. In 1999 she decided to start her own band, Fresh Brew, with a few old local musicians. But because family is at the core of her music, Danielle took her brothers Nick and Kris with her to Philadelphia. There their new band, Trampled Under Foot, quickly became a reference in its genre. She learnt the bass and quickly turned into a virtuoso. After thirteen years of Trampled Under Foot, Danielle Nicole decided on a solo career, releasing an EP and in 2015, a first solo album, Wolf Den, produced by Anders Osborne. Even more masterful, even more sensual, even more soulful, Cry No More is the even more album of an ambassador weary of a certain tradition, but whose gutsy singing makes each performance a musical oddity. And to make this 2018 cuvée even more powerful, she invited four formidable musicians: Luther Dickinson, Sonny Landreth, Kenny Wayne Shepherd and Walter Trout. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Blues - Released July 31, 2015 | Silvertone

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Once again working with producer/songwriter Tom Hambridge -- the bluesman's main collaborator since 2008's Skin Deep -- Buddy Guy serves up a straight-ahead platter with Born to Play Guitar, his 28th studio album. Many of Guy's latter-day records loosely follow a theme, but Born to Play Guitar is pretty direct: just a collection of songs designed to showcase Buddy's oversized Stratocaster. Which isn't to say there's either a lack of variety or pro forma songwriting here. Hambridge cleverly colors Born to Play Guitar with a few bold, unexpected flourishes: the sweeps of sweet strings that accentuate "(Baby) You've Got What It Takes," a duet with Joss Stone that lightly recalls Etta James' Chess Records work; the big, blaring horns of "Thick Like Mississippi Mud" that moves that track out of the Delta and into an urban setting; the acoustic "Come Back Muddy" which performs that trick in reverse, pushing Chicago blues back down south. Elsewhere, Van Morrison contributes a moving tribute to B.B. King in "Flesh and Bone," a heartfelt ballad that doesn't quite fit with the rest of the record because it's about song, not feel -- a nice anomaly on a record whose greater concern is juke joint boogie. Guy delivers on this front quite ably, particularly when he's paired with fellow blues lifer Kim Wilson (as he is on "Too Late" and "Kiss Me Quick") or when Billy Gibbons slithers out of the Texas hills to lay down the heavy stomp of "Wear You Out," and while there are no surprises on these duets, nor on the proudly traditional Chicago blues of "Born to Play Guitar," "Back Up Mama," and "Whiskey, Beer & Wine," there is still pleasure in hearing a master tear into his beloved music. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Blues - Released May 5, 2017 | Concord Records, Inc. (UMG Account)

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If a decade separates Henry Saint Clair Fredericks alias Taj Mahal from Kevin Roosevelt Moore alias Keb' Mo', blues is the common thread that joins the lives of these two great musicians. But this blues is anything but monolithic, taking nourishment from soul as well as from rock'n'roll and world music. Taj Mahal and Keb' Mo' have united for the first time under the banner of TajMo to bring out this record. Mixing covers and original compositions and bringing in Bonnie Raitt, Joe Walsh, Sheila E. and Lizz Wright, the album offers two styles that mix together to give birth to a music striking the perfect balance between tradition and innovation. Here the soul is festive (That’s Who I Am), there the blues is pared-down (Diving Duck Blues) and a little further off there are Cajun flavours too (Squeeze Box). But it is the collaboration between the two men that makes TajMo really exhilarating. © CM/Qobuz
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Blues - Released December 2, 2016 | Polydor Records

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Blue & Lonesome is the first studio album in over a decade from The Rolling Stones. Recorded in just three days in London, England, Blue & Lonesome takes the band back to their roots and the passion for blues music which has always been at the heart and soul of the Rolling Stones. Blue & Lonesome is available in various formats and will be released on December 2nd by Polydor Records. The album was recorded over the course of just three short days in December 2015 at British Grove Studios in West London, just a stone’s throw from Richmond and Eel Pie Island where the Stones started out as a young blues band playing pubs and clubs. Their approach to the album was that it should be spontaneous and played live in the studio without overdubs. The band – Mick Jagger (vocals & harp), Keith Richards (guitar), Charlie Watts (drums), and Ronnie Wood (guitar) were joined by their long time touring sidemen Darryl Jones (bass), Chuck Leavell (keyboards) and Matt Clifford (keyboards) and, for two of the twelve tracks, by old friend Eric Clapton, who happened to be in the next studio making his own album. Blue & Lonesome sees the Rolling Stones tipping their hats to their early days as a blues band when they played the music of Jimmy Reed, Willie Dixon, Eddie Taylor, Little Walter and Howlin’ Wolf – artists whose songs are featured on this album. The tracks are – ‘Just Your Fool’, ‘Commit A Crime’, ‘Blue And Lonesome’, ‘All Of Your Love’, ‘I Gotta Go’, ‘Everybody Knows About My Good Thing’, ‘Ride ‘Em On Down’, ‘Hate To See You Go’, ‘Hoo Doo Blues’, ‘Little Rain’, ‘Just Like I Treat You’, ‘I Can’t Quit You Baby’. “This album is manifest testament to the purity of their love for making music, and the blues is, for the Stones, the fountainhead of everything they do.” - Don Was, Co-Producer of Blue & Lonesome. - @rollingstones.com
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Blues - Released January 29, 2013 | Epic - Legacy

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Blues - Released January 1, 1961 | Argo

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Blues - Released January 1, 1964 | Geffen*

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Muddy's "unplugged" album was cut in September of 1963 and still sounds fresh and vital today. It was Muddy simply returning to his original style on a plain acoustic guitar in a well-tuned room with Willie Dixon on string bass, Clifton James on drums, and Buddy Guy on second acoustic guitar. The nine tracks are divvied up between full rhythm section treatments with Buddy and Muddy as a duo and the final track, "Feel Like Going Home," which Waters approaches solo. What makes this version of the album a worthwhile buy is the inclusion of five bonus tracks from his next two sessions: An April 1964 session brings us Willie Dixon's "The Same Thing" and Muddy's "You Can't Lose What You Never Had," while the October 1964 session features J.T. Brown on sax and clarinet on "Short Dress Woman" and "My John the Conqueror Root," as well as "Put Me in Your Lay Away," another strong side. Folk Singer offers both sides of Muddy from the early '60s. ~ Cub Koda
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Blues - Released April 20, 2018 | Anti - Epitaph

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Blues - Released October 24, 2014 | Epic

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Blues - Released January 25, 2019 | Provogue

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Bluesman Walter Trout returns with a record a little different than his usual output. Survivor Blues is comprised exclusively of covers, and he has chosen to record mainly obscure, old blues songs rather than more well-known picks. The album follows 2017's We're All in This Together and features his take on Jimmy Dawkins' "Me, My Guitar and the Blues." ~ Bekki Bemrose
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Blues - Released November 10, 2017 | Mojo Hand Records

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Blues - Released July 20, 2018 | Provogue Records

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The Apocalypse Blues Revue is coming back strong with this second album released by Provogue, The Shape Of Blues To Come. A rather dangerous music! Did the Florida-based American band sell their soul to the devil in exchange for such mastery of electric blues? The question can be raised. Made up of Shannon Larkin (drums), Brian Carpenter (bass), Ray Cerbone (vocals) and Tony Rombola (guitar), the quartet respects the essence of blues while still imposing their own style. Right from the first track, Open Spaces, the suspense is at its peak. A gong, followed by whispers, then a deep, wearisome singing, almost voodoo-esque. In 2016, the band had already taken this path down to the purgatory with their first eponymous album. Two years later, they venture towards hell itself, for a diabolical concert. Between metal and roots music, the Apocalypse Blues Revue is capable of composing around blues as well as moving away from it. With them, boredom is forbidden. Incendiary riffs, an energetic voice swinging on the chorus of Have You Heard?! and carried by Larkin’s rhythmic force… There’s nothing to envy to heaven! There is a Morrison vibe to To Hell With You, but in this case Jim would be dressed in a rather Goth style to announce the apocalypse and the quartet’s takeover. © Anna Coluthe/Qobuz
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Blues - Released September 22, 2017 | Exile

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One cannot say that Van Morrison’s recordings of the last twenty years have left as much of an impression as his early 70s masterpieces such as Astral Weeks, Moondance or Veedon Fleece. But in 2012 Born To Sing: No Plan B was a nice come back, proving the Irish bard still had a lot left in the tank. Four years later Keep Me Singing confirmed this intuition with new songs on which Van The Man not only adapted to the constraint of age – he doesn’t sing like in 1969 anymore – but in fact masterfully tamed these limitations, giving each track a lived-in and warm atmosphere. Less passion and exuberance, more finesse and heart, all in his usual wonderful combination of soul, jazz and blues, his true trademark. This spirit remains on Roll With The Punches even if the repertoire is mostly made up of blues and soul covers (Bo Diddley, T-Bone Walker, Count Basie, Sam Cooke, Sister Rosetta Tharpe, Lightnin' Hopkins, Mose Allison, Little Walter, Bo Diddley), along with five original songs. A 37th album produced by Van Morrison himself and on which he collaborated with Jeff Beck, Paul Jones, Jason Rebello, Chris Farlowe and Georgie Fame. © CM/Qobuz
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Blues - Released June 16, 2014 | Jazz Village

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Lucky Peterson's father was blues guitarist and singer James Peterson, a well-known regional musician who also owned the Governor's Inn, a premier blues nightclub in Buffalo, New York, which means Peterson grew up around his father's friends, who just happened to be touring and recording musicians like Jimmy Reed, Muddy Waters, and Bill Doggett, and he learned from all of them. He became fascinated with the Hammond B-3 organ as a young child, and by the time he was five, he'd proved to be a prodigy on it. Mentored by another of his father's friends, the great songwriter, bassist, arranger, and producer Willie Dixon, Peterson was still only five when he scored an R&B hit with the Dixon-produced "1-2-3-4," the novelty of it all landing him appearances on The Tonight Show, The Ed Sullivan Show, and others, and his debut album appeared in 1969. But Peterson had an exploratory nature, and while he could have had quite a career as a keyboard player, he picked up the guitar at the age of eight, and by the time he was a teen, he had developed an emotionally searing guitar style. He could have relaunched his career then, but instead he attended the Buffalo Academy of Performing Arts, and went out on the road as part of the touring bands of Etta James and Otis Rush, spent three years as Little Milton's keyboardist, another three years in Bobby "Blue" Bland's band, and backed jazz stars like Hank Crawford and Abbey Lincoln. He learned blues, jazz, soul, R&B, funk, and gospel, and by the time he made his re-debut as a bandleader with the Bob Greenlee-produced Lucky Strikes! in 1989, Peterson was a triple-threat multi-instrumentalist who managed to fuse R&B, jazz, gospel, funk, and rock with the blues. All of this leads up to this very personal and semi-autobiographical set, and his 18th album as a bandleader. The Son of a Bluesman, aside from being another fine set of Peterson's joyous fusion blues, is also the first of his albums that he has produced himself, and it has a warm, career-summing kind of feel to it. The title track, "The Son of a Bluesman," and the two different versions of the gospel-themed "I'm Still Here," give this album a personal and retrospective feel, as does the striking, and even silly "Joy," a straight-up family home recording featuring a rap interlude. But perhaps the best and most poignant track on an album full of standouts is the lovely instrumental "Nana Jarnell," dedicated to both Peterson's mother and his wife's mother, musician, singer, and songwriter Tamara Stovall-Peterson. Peterson's guitar lead on the track is a marvel of crying, elegantly balanced phrasing, almost horn-like or vocal-like, and it speaks and sings like the marvel it is. This is perhaps Peterson's most well-rounded and personal album yet, and it coheres in a wonderful arc, capturing the blues as an ever-flowing, joyous, and ultimately uplifting thing. ~ Steve Leggett

Blues - Released January 26, 2018 | Jazz Village

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Album after album, Raphaël Imbert is writing a long and peerless musical novel. With Music Is My Hope, the saxophonist tackles jazz by different routes. Including by way of spirituality, and the spirit of the blues. With different voices hailing from far-flung places, Imbert is building bridges between the genres, the better to underline the deep cross-pollination that exists within the south of the USA. This time, Imbert invites Marion Rampal, Aurore Imbert, Manu Barthélémy and Big Ron Hunter to sing reflections and revolts, the holy and the political alike. Above all, this celebration of a history and a heritage never comes off as saccharine. Everything here is alive! Even when Raphaël Imbert and his accomplices cover Joni Mitchell's The Circle Game or a spiritual as famous as Didn’t My Lord Deliver Daniel. A straight-shooting offering which even takes in an Occitan rendition of Vaqui lo polit mes de mai… All this lively, highly-symbolic material is magnified by the saxophonist's grand design, which he worked up with his virtuoso musical wingmen: Pierre-François Blanchard on keyboards, Jean-Luc Di Fraya on drums, Pierre Durand and Thomas Weirich on guitars. There can be some chaotic moments here or there, like in a fight; and other moments have the solemnity of a confession. But however they play it, it is always spirited. Magnificent. © MD/Qobuz
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Blues - Released September 9, 2016 | Suretone Records

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Assembled from various shows from various tours from around the world, 2016's Live: Greatest Hits from Around the World is billed as ZZ Top's first "full-length live album" -- a matter of dispute considering how Eagle Rock released three CD/DVD/Blu-ray combo sets between 2008 and 2014. There is no visual component to Live: Greatest Hits from Around the World, which may be how it skates around the first live album distinction -- if there's no video, this is a pure album -- but the record mines a similar musical vein, collecting highlights from latter-day ZZ Top tours. During the 2000s and 2010s, ZZ Top released an excellent studio album called La Futura, but that's ignored here in favor for all the songs that are classic rock staples. Older, the Lil' Ol' Band from Texas sounds thicker and heavier -- and Billy Gibbons' growl is so gruff it seems tattered -- but that helps distinguish these versions from the spit and polish of the studio versions; not better, per se, but certainly the work of a band whose members happily settle into their advanced years, not wishing to change a thing about how they do things. Nevertheless, the undeniable highlights are the two tracks featuring cameos from Jeff Beck: he contributes lyrical solos to "Rough Boy" and helps with the heavy-footed boogie of "Sixteen Tons," pushing the trio just far enough out of its comfort zone to provide some crackle. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine