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On the occasion of the release of his new album "Solo Piano III", Chilly Gonzales selected for Qobuz the albums that marked his musical education, in this exclusive and well-documented playlist.1. Frankie Goes To Hollywood - Welcome To The Pleasure Dome I have an older brother and an older sister, so like many people, my taste was kind of shaped by ...

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Title Artist Album Duration
1
Sign 'O' the Times (LP Version)
Prince Sign "O" the Times 00:05:02
2
Piano Concerto No. 2 in G minor Op. 16: Scherzo (Vivace)
Evgeny Kissin Prokofiev: Piano Concertos 2 & 3 00:02:24

Sergei Prokofiev, Composer - Philharmonia Orchestra, Orchestra, Lead Vocals - Evgeny Kissin, Piano, Lead Vocals - Jay David Saks, Producer - Vladimir Ashkenazy, Conductor, Lead Vocals - Evgeny Kissin/Philharmonia Orchestra/Vladimir Ashkenazy, MainArtist

© 2009 EMI Records Ltd. ℗ 2009 Warner Classics, Warner Music UK Ltd

3
Intermezzo No. 2 in A Major, Op. 118 - Andante teneramente (Remastered)
Glenn Gould Brahms: 10 Intermezzi for Piano - Gould Remastered 00:05:47

Glenn Gould, Main Artist, Piano - Johannes Brahms, Composer - Joseph Scianni, Producer

(P) 1961 Sony Music Entertainment

4
Super High (Album Version (Explicit))
Rick Ross Teflon Don 00:03:46

Eric Wright, ComposerLyricist - Lorenzo Patterson, ComposerLyricist - Leroy Bonner, ComposerLyricist - Marshall Jones, ComposerLyricist - Marvin Pierce, ComposerLyricist - Andrew Noland, ComposerLyricist - O'Shea Jackson, ComposerLyricist - William Roberts, ComposerLyricist - Charles Carter, ComposerLyricist - Roger Parker, ComposerLyricist - Andre Romell Young, ComposerLyricist - Mike Stokes, ComposerLyricist - Shaffer Smith, ComposerLyricist - Walter Morrison, ComposerLyricist - DJ Clark Kent, Producer - Gimel "Young Guru" Keaton, Mixer, StudioPersonnel - Ne-Yo, FeaturedArtist - Rick Ross, MainArtist - Gregory Webster, ComposerLyricist - Ralph Middlebrook, ComposerLyricist - William DeVaughn, ComposerLyricist - Norman Bruce Napier, ComposerLyricist - Jodd Knight, ComposerLyricist - Marco Richardson, ComposerLyricist - Emanuel Johnson, ComposerLyricist - Steven Arrington, ComposerLyricist - Buddy L. Hank, ComposerLyricist - Eddie "eMIX" Hernandez, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Scott Berger-Felder, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Jaymz Hardy Martin III, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Andre Cleghorn, Bass Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Rennie Johnson, Electric Guitar, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 2010 The Island Def Jam Music Group

5
Been Around The World
R. Kelly Chocolate Factory 00:04:05

Serban Ghenea, Mixing Engineer - Abel Garibaldi, Recording Engineer - Donnie Lyle, Guitar - John Hanes, Engineer - Rodney East, Keyboards - Ian Mereness, Recording Engineer - R. Kelly featuring Ja Rule, Performer - Andy Gallas, Recording Engineer - Andy Gallas, Programmer - R. Kelly, Composer - R. Kelly, Lyricist - R. Kelly, Producer - R. Kelly, Arranger - R. Kelly, Mixing Engineer

(P) 2003 Zomba Recording LLC

6
Compared to What
Roberta Flack First Take 00:05:16

John Pizzarelli, Guitar - Roberta Flack, Vocals, MainArtist - Joel Dorn, Producer - Ron Carter, Bass Guitar - Ray Lucas, Drums - Gene McDaniels, Composer - Robert Flack, Piano

© 1969 Atlantic Records ℗ 1969 Atlantic Records

7
So What'Cha Want
Beastie Boys Beastie Boys Music 00:03:37

Mario Caldato Jr., Producer, Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Michael Diamond, ComposerLyricist - Adam Yauch, ComposerLyricist - Adam Horovitz, ComposerLyricist - Chris Athens, Mastering Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Beastie Boys, Producer, MainArtist

℗ 2005 Capitol Records, LLC and Beastie Boys

8
Well I Wonder
The Smiths Meat Is Murder 00:03:59

Johnny Marr, Guitar, Piano, Writer - STEPHEN STREET, Engineer - The Smiths, Producer, MainArtist - MORRISSEY, Vocals, Writer - Tim Young, Masterer - Andy Rourke, Bass Guitar - Mike Joyce, Drums

© 2013 Warner Music UK Ltd. ℗ 1985 Warner Music UK Ltd.

9
Köln, January 24, 1975, Pt. II C
Keith Jarrett The Köln Concert (Live at the Opera, Köln, 1975) 00:06:56

Keith Jarrett, Composer, Piano - Manfred Eicher, Producer - Martin Wieland, Recording Engineer

℗ 1975 ECM Records GmbH, under exclusive license to Universal Music Classics & Jazz - a division of Universal Music GmbH

10
Rap God
Eminem The Marshall Mathers LP2 00:06:03

Marshall Mathers, ComposerLyricist - D. Davis, ComposerLyricist - J. Burns, ComposerLyricist - L. Walters, ComposerLyricist - Eminem, MainArtist - D. Birks, ComposerLyricist - S. Hacker, ComposerLyricist - M. Delgiorno, ComposerLyricist - DVLP, Producer - J Lee, ComposerLyricist - K. Nazel, ComposerLyricist - B. Zayas Jr, ComposerLyricist - F. Shaheed, ComposerLyricist

℗ 2013 Aftermath Records

11
Köln, January 24, 1975, Pt. II A
Keith Jarrett The Köln Concert (Live at the Opera, Köln, 1975) 00:14:54

Keith Jarrett, Composer, Piano - Manfred Eicher, Producer - Martin Wieland, Recording Engineer

℗ 1975 ECM Records GmbH, under exclusive license to Universal Music Classics & Jazz - a division of Universal Music GmbH

12
I Want the One I Can't Have
The Smiths Meat Is Murder 00:03:13

Johnny Marr, Guitar, Piano, Writer - STEPHEN STREET, Engineer - The Smiths, Producer, MainArtist - MORRISSEY, Vocals, Writer - Tim Young, Masterer - Andy Rourke, Bass Guitar - Mike Joyce, Drums

© 2013 Warner Music UK Ltd. ℗ 1985 Warner Music UK Ltd.

13
So Much Better
Eminem The Marshall Mathers LP2 00:04:21

Marshall Mathers, ComposerLyricist - Luis Resto, Producer, Additional Producer, ComposerLyricist - Eminem, Producer, MainArtist

℗ 2013 Aftermath Records

14
Heart Of A Woman
R. Kelly Chocolate Factory 00:04:31

Donnie Lyle, Guitar - Donnie Lyle, Bass - Abel Garibaldi, Programmer - Abel Garibaldi, Mixing Engineer - Andy Gallas, Recording Engineer - Rodney East, Keyboards - Ian Mereness, Recording Engineer - Ian Mereness, Programmer - R. Kelly, Producer - R. Kelly, Composer - R. Kelly, Lyricist - R. Kelly, Arranger - R. Kelly, Mixing Engineer - R. Kelly, Performer

(P) 2003 Zomba Recording LLC

Freddy Kempf, piano - Andrew Litton, Conductor - Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra, Orchestra

(C) 2010 BIS (P) 2010 BIS

16
Hot Thing (2020 Remaster)
Prince Sign O' The Times 00:05:38

Prince, Composer, Lyricist, Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer

(P) 2020, 1987 NPG Records, Inc., under exclusive license to Legacy Recordings

17
The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face
Roberta Flack First Take 00:05:22

John Pizzarelli, Guitar - Ewan MacColl, Writer - Roberta Flack, Vocals, MainArtist - Joel Dorn, Producer - Ron Carter, Bass Guitar - Ray Lucas, Drums - Robert Flack, Piano

© 1969 Atlantic Records ℗ 1969 Atlantic Records

18
Jimmy James (Single Version)
Beastie Boys Anthology: The Sounds Of Science 00:03:04

Mario Caldato Jr., Producer, Engineer, StudioPersonnel, ComposerLyricist - Michael Diamond, ComposerLyricist - Adam Yauch, ComposerLyricist - Adam Horovitz, ComposerLyricist - Beastie Boys, Producer, MainArtist - Ed Chalpin, ComposerLyricist

This Compilation (C) 1999 Capitol Records, Inc. and Beastie Boys. All rights reserved. Unauthorized reproduction is a violation of applicable laws. Manufactured by Capitol Records, Inc., 1750 North Vine Street, Hollywood, CA 90028. ℗ 1999 Capitol Records, LLC and Beastie Boys

About Playlist

On the occasion of the release of his new album "Solo Piano III", Chilly Gonzales selected for Qobuz the albums that marked his musical education, in this exclusive and well-documented playlist.

1. Frankie Goes To Hollywood - Welcome To The Pleasure Dome I have an older brother and an older sister, so like many people, my taste was kind of shaped by what they like, but I guess Frankie Goes To Hollywood was the first real music of my own. I think it really had to do with the super-villainous personality of Holly Johnson, even more than the music; this guy seemed like he was getting revenge by being a pop star. And to some extent, it inspired me that there was so much mischievous energy in what he was doing, and he took negativity and turned it into something positive.

2. Prince - Sign "O" the Times I think there's only maybe two songs which have the Revolution on them, and the rest of them is Prince programming a lot of the drums and playing all the parts himself. It's just such a singular vision, you just hear one creative genius doing everything and I think that leads to a certain style of music-making that... all my production work was kind of based on that idea that you have the arrangement in your head before you start and if there's one person doing it, then there's much less chance of each musician trying to get their own ego in edgeways.

3. Stevie Wonder - Fullingness' First Finale I guess Prince led me to Stevie Wonder; I was into him first, around age 14, 15, and then that slowly led me to Stevie Wonder. Like many musicians, you love funk music, you love the idea of the perfect groove, but it was never just enough for me, I could never just listen to The Gap Band or Kool & The Gang really with a straight face. With Stevie Wonder, there's the European aspect, the Mozart aspect, that Prince also has, and that comes from the overarching vision: the groove is there, in the end, to support music-based songwriting, which is to say not lyric-based songwriting. Both Stevie Wonder and Prince are hit-and-miss as far as lyrics are concerned - when they have good lyrics, it's like an accident.

4. Prokofiev - Piano Concertos 2 and 3 Up until that time, classical music represented to me, like for many people, pretty poncy stuff - Mozart, Beethoven, all that just couldn't speak to me. In my devouring-music phase of being a teenager, Prokofiev essentially was the first thing that was complicated enough and reminded me of what I liked in jazz music and had the sort of dramatic sweep of what I liked in pop music.

5. Glenn Gould - Brahms Intermezzi What's funny is that Glenn Gould avoided a lot of crowd-pleasing material, he avoided everything from Beethoven through to the Impressionists, so a pretty big chunk of what all piano players would play and he focussed on extreme modern stuff - he was a real champion of Schoenberg and the beginning of what I call 'unlistenable music'. So what's interesting is that he has this Brahms album, which is kind of an eyesore in his catalogue. He hardly played anything from that period and that composer, and in turns out that he made that record in his house on his own piano, and he essentially did it for a woman that he was in love with. I think it's interesting that when it came time to get laid, Glenn Gould all of a sudden found reserves to do a certain kind of thing that he wasn't able to do when he was just staying in his ivory tower.

6. Rick Ross - Teflon Don I got into hip hop when everyone else really did, around the classic 90s golden age. That was when I started to see the capitalist revenge fantasy at work and I just liked the idea of how fast it moved and the competitive aspect - needing to push it forward faster than others styles of music, and the way there’s was always someone trying do something more avantgarde with the beats and more and more detailed with the approach to words, so I just followed it a bit more like I used to read comic books.

7. Roberta Flack - First Take This album itself I literally wore out the vinyl of it over the years and it's just - it's that perfect sweet spot between that austere European approach and the approach to jazz playing that isn't about masturbation. She has some of the greatest jazz musicians playing with her - Ron Carter is the bass player, who is Miles Davis's bass player, but she's playing the piano, but of course she's a singer, so the piano playing is never doing anything but serving the song. It has the European way of treating the song as the most important part, the actual melody and the feeling put into it, so for me it's the ultimate of classical and jazz approaches without any of the deadweight in that, in that it's a pop album, so you don't have any of the 12 minute-long movements and any of the impossible-to-follow developments of classical music which don't work anymore in the 21st century.

8. Beastie Boys - Check Your Head They influenced me in that these were middle-class Jewish guys coming and rapping. I already appreciated them, but what really clinched it was that they started to play instruments and all of a sudden there was a connection made for me. Mike Diamond was playing the drums, Ad-Rock was playing the guitar and MCA, rest in peace, was playing the bass and they were able to bridge their music fanboy nature together with being fanboys of rap, and all of that just crystallised it for me. It just literally was an inspiration.

9. The Smiths - Meat Is Murder Similar to Frankie Goes To Hollywood, there was something so superior about Morrissey. It was some of the first music where musically I had nothing to really find to really like in it: it's pretty square. Really the attraction was Morrissey and this vengeful nature of his intelligence, similar to what Holly Johnson had - you can see that in the 80s, all my tastes were to the megalomaniac. Now I see Morrissey, he's much more of a melancholy melgalmonaic, but nothing captures teenage alienation quite like Morrissey. I think there's a certain reaction to depression that Morrissey really codified: everybody turns depression into something else, and you can trace that back to Morrissey. A song like 'The Grudge' off Ivory Tower - you cannot get that without Morrissey.

10. Keith Jarrett - Koln Concert I remember someone telling me “this guy, he just improvises for an hour and it's the most amazing thing”. He's the exception that proves the rule - I think if anyone goes on stage and improvises for an hour, then they're inherently awful - it's too risky and it doesn't respect people that pay money to basically say you're going to fight your way out of a paper bag in front of them. I could never do that - it goes against my entertainment instincts. But of course Keith Jarrett: every rule has its exception. It just is really sublime. He's done other live concerts and released them, but none of them quite hold a candle to it. He just was truly inspired - in a way Keith Jarrett goes against so much of what I believe of improvising and of being an extremely suffering artist and being a diva: the guy won't play if there's a draught. If the piano seat doesn't go down far enough, he's cancelling the whole thing! He makes no effort to be easy, but once in a while someone comes along and they can get away with that. It's nice to know that every once in a while even my rules can be broken by someone.

11. Eminem - Marshall Mathers LP I think what Eminem brought to the game was extreme self-awarenss. In a way, he's like the anti-R Kelly. He did the kind of pre-emptive, Andy Kaufman approach. What Andy Kaufman did in his comedy performances was that he'd always be one step ahead of what the audience could be thinking about him and be so incredibly intelligent as to let the audience know what they're thinking about him as they're thinking it. Of course, Eminem, being the first white rapper to do it in a way - he had to be in a very special position. He's like President Obama, he has to be twice as good and half as black, and in Eminem's case, he had to be twice as good and half as white. He did that, I think, by being so incredibly aware, so there was no chance to really ridicule him, because anything you could have said about him - he is everything we say he is. He has that Andy Kaufman level of what I would call the conceptual mastery of the perception of what he was doing, and that was just incredibly inspiring. It's an incredible album musically and lyrically, and that's why he owned the whole decade - up until Kanye West there wasn't really a rapper who really defined the time [like him].

12. R. Kelly - Chocolate Factory I could have put Nate Dogg down here, but R Kelly has gone further: Nate Dogg also had that quality to me, to have that ridiculousness of embracing that contradiction between being religious and 'I Believe I Can Fly' and all these very saccharine-sounding things combined with the sweetest interpretation of the most gangster bravado ever. ‘Ignition Remix’, of course, is just such an incredible classic, it's one of the greatest songs of all time.

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