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Trios - Released May 19, 2015 | Zig-Zag Territoires

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
This recording is the first to be made by Trio Dali with its new violinist, Jack Liebeck. After a Ravel programme in 2009, then a Schubert disc, the Trio turns its talents to the two Mendelssohn trios and transcriptions of Bach. The Trio Dali has thus chosen to contrast Mendelssohn’s two trios with works by a composer for whose rediscovery Mendelssohn was largely responsible in his time: Johann Sebastian Bach. Thus, the Trio Dali proposes a recording that is a sort mirroring of Mendelssohn and Bach.
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Solo Piano - Released May 5, 2015 | Zig-Zag Territoires

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Lest anyone think modernist piano pieces all sound the same or operate on the same premises, Alexei Lubimov has chosen a program of key works that are not only quite varied in style, content, and expression, but are distinctive because of their originality. Charles Ives' iconoclastic Piano Sonata No. 2, "Concord, Mass., 1840-60," is an excellent example of his method of freely juxtaposing chaotic dissonances and jagged rhythms with raucous quotations of popular melodies and hymn tunes, in a spirit of rugged American individualism. To contrast this sonata, Lubimov has selected works from the Second Viennese School, to demonstrate the approaches taken by Anton Webern in his dodecaphonic Piano Variations, and Alban Berg in his loosely atonal Piano Sonata, Op. 1. Where Webern strives for a delicate balance of pitches and a purity of ideas, Berg's music is intensely emotional, languid, and unsettled, and these characteristics show that their approaches diverged as much from each other as they did from Ives. Lubimov's playing is sensitive and sympathetic, and his clear interpretations make this album something of a revelation, even for those who know these pieces well. To be sure, they are still challenging today, many decades after they were written, and they are enjoyed most by well-informed and adventurous listeners. Lubimov provides a fine introduction to these landmarks of modernism, and this exceptional disc from Zig Zag Territoires and Outhere Music is highly recommended. © TiVo
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Chamber Music - Released April 21, 2015 | Zig-Zag Territoires

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released March 24, 2015 | Zig-Zag Territoires

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Secular Vocal Music - Released March 24, 2015 | Zig-Zag Territoires

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Classical - Released March 24, 2015 | Zig-Zag Territoires

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Duets - Released February 24, 2015 | Zig-Zag Territoires

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released January 13, 2015 | Zig-Zag Territoires

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Solo Piano - Released January 13, 2015 | Zig-Zag Territoires

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Exceptional Sound Recording
Franz Liszt's piano transcriptions were among his most important contributions in promoting the music of the early Romantic masters, and he labored over the symphonies of Ludwig van Beethoven for more than two decades, completing the entire set of transcriptions in 1865. Yury Martynov has been releasing them on Zig Zag Territoires since 2012, and this fourth and penultimate volume in his series presents the Symphony No. 4 in B-flat major and the Symphony No. 5 in C minor, performed on a Blüthner piano, ca. 1867, from the Edwin Beunk collection. This vintage instrument gives a good idea of the varied sonorities available to Liszt, and Martynov skillfully re-creates the orchestral effects that are so brilliantly imitated in these arrangements. Some listeners who avoid historic keyboard instruments may be cautious about this recording, but the sound of the Blüthner piano is rather close to a modern piano in tone and dynamics, and it is fuller and much more robust than a fortepiano. Martynov's performance of the Fourth is light and agile, while his Fifth is dramatic and full-blooded, with a virtuosic flashiness that is wholly in the Lisztian tradition. © TiVo
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Classical - Released November 4, 2014 | Zig-Zag Territoires

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Exceptional Sound Recording
Lorenzo Gatto's 2014 release on Outhere signals his return to classical performance, following popular successes with his crossover violin group, Trilogy. Yet because Gatto has been firmly grounded in classical music since childhood, recording Beethoven's Violin Concerto and the two Romances is a homecoming only in a technical sense, since he plays with the ease and mastery of one who has spent years living with these works. Accompanied by Benjamin Levy and the Orchestre de Chamber Pelléas, Gatto delivers an expansive and spirited reading of the Violin Concerto, giving the music natural elegance in his clean phrasing and pure tone, and high energy in his virtuosic displays. The Romances are long-breathed and lyrical, and with the orchestra's stirring performance of the Overture to the Creatures of Prometheus, this is a well-balanced program that shows Gatto's and Levy's excellent taste and superb musicianship. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 21, 2014 | Zig-Zag Territoires

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Most modern performances of Carl Orff's Carmina Burana employ a full-scale symphony orchestra, replete with a large string section that tends to homogenize the overall sound and obscure details of the orchestration. This rendition by Jos van Immerseel and Anima Eterna Brugge offers surprisingly transparent sonorities, produced by emphasizing the winds, pianos, and percussion, reducing the number of strings, and exposing the inventive instrumental combinations that Orff intended to be heard. To further the effort at authenticity, Immerseel also uses vintage German instruments of the 1930s, which would have been desired by Orff, though they became difficult to find after WWII and have been supplanted in most recordings by less distinctive modern instruments. Do these historically informed decisions make a difference in the way Carmina Burana sounds and affects listeners? It is certainly cleaner in sound and crisper in accentuation, and the leaner textures make the diction of Collegium Vocale Gent and Scholum Cantorum Cantate Domino perfectly audible. Expressively, this is an exciting interpretation, full of energy and rhythmic propulsion, and whatever view one takes of Carmina Burana's inherent musical value, this recording is an excellent presentation that makes the case for following authentic period practices, even in a 20th century work. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 21, 2014 | Zig-Zag Territoires

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Classical - Released October 7, 2014 | Zig-Zag Territoires

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Classical - Released September 23, 2014 | Zig-Zag Territoires

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Lieder (German) - Released September 22, 2014 | Zig-Zag Territoires

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
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Classical - Released May 19, 2014 | Zig-Zag Territoires

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Classical - Released April 8, 2014 | Zig-Zag Territoires

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica - Hi-Res Audio
Although it is played on a period instrument, no one is arguing that this recording of Haydn's The Seven Last Words of Christ is historically authentic. The work, exceptionally in Haydn's output, exists in multiple versions, for orchestra, string quartet, chorus, and keyboard (either fortepiano or harpsichord). But surely Haydn did not have the instrument heard here, the rare tangent piano, in his head. This was, speaking roughly, a piano-harpsichord hybrid that never really found its footing in the late 18th century. As long as listeners are down with the idea of a fairly speculative recording, the effect of the tangent piano in this particular work is electrifying. Lubimov gets the best of both worlds: the intimacy of the keyboard version and the dynamic contrasts and timbral shadings of the orchestral original. The keyboard transcription is not by Haydn himself but was made in his own time, and he approved it. Lubimov works from this, tweaking it and adding contrasts that break up the seven consecutive slow movements and give them an extraordinarily expressive quality. Even when listeners know it's coming, the final Terremoto movement, depicting the earthquake following Christ's crucifixion, comes as a shock. Listeners will never hear the work quite the same way again after experiencing this recording, and even if Haydn didn't intend it this way, most may well end up wishing he had. © TiVo
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Symphonic Music - Released February 25, 2014 | Zig-Zag Territoires

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - Hi-Res Audio
One of the greatest orchestrators of the 20th century was Maurice Ravel, and his subtle handling of evocative tone colors and atmospheric orchestral textures widely influenced composers of concert and film music. But most modern performances of Ravel's music don't give an accurate impression of the sounds he heard, and it is somewhat surprising to find that French instruments of the early 20th century, handmade by independent craftsmen and small-scale manufacturers, had more distinctive timbres than the mass-produced instruments used in performances today. Most noticeable are the piquant and pungent colors of the woodwinds, and Ravel's delicate scoring for them in Ma mère l'oye presents their sonorities to best advantage. His orchestration of Modest Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition also reveals these unique qualities in his transparent scoring, as well as the temperamental sounds of brass instruments, which had more varied characteristics than their modern equivalents. This fascinating album by Anima Eterna Brugge, conducted by Jos van Immerseel, demonstrates the great value of playing Ravel on authentic period instruments, and shows that he worked with a sonic palette that is far more nuanced and colorful than is usually heard. Listeners who enjoy investigations into historical practices should defintely hear this disc, and they will appreciate the extraordinary depth and detail in the reproduction. Highly recommended. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 25, 2014 | Zig-Zag Territoires

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Classical - Released February 11, 2014 | Zig-Zag Territoires

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