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Brahms: Symphonies Nos. 1-4 (Live)

Wiener Symphoniker

Classical - Released August 7, 2020 | Wiener Symphoniker

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Beethoven: Symphonies

Wiener Symphoniker

Classical - Released November 1, 2019 | Wiener Symphoniker

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Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, Op. 125 "Choral" (Live)

Wiener Symphoniker

Classical - Released September 13, 2019 | Wiener Symphoniker

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Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique, Op. 14, H. 48 & Lélio, Op. 14b, H. 55B (Live)

Wiener Symphoniker

Classical - Released May 24, 2019 | Wiener Symphoniker

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It’s from Vienna, not Paris, that this new recording of the Symphonie fantastique is brought to us under the direction of Philippe Jordan. The Swiss conductor wears several hats, since he is the musical director of the Paris Opera and the Vienna Symphony Orchestra, with whom he conducted this Berliozian recording at the Musikverein in Vienna.The year of Berlioz (2019 marks 150 years since his death) saw many new versions of the Fantastique cropping up. This album stands out through its coupling with Lélio, ou Le Retour à la vie, a work which, according to Berlioz, “must be heard immediately after the Symphonie Fantastique, of which it is the end and the complement”. As an extraordinary autobiographical work, Lélio is accompanied by a monologue read by an actor; here, it is the ex-singer and actor Jean-Philippe Lafont who represents Berlioz as he struggles to overcome his despair. It’s a deep reflection under the auspices of Shakespeare as well as a mise en abyme of the life of an artist facing up to his demons. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Beethoven: Symphonies Nos. 6 & 8 (Live)

Wiener Symphoniker

Classical - Released March 15, 2019 | Wiener Symphoniker

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Beethoven: Symphonies Nos. 2 & 7 (Live)

Philippe Jordan

Symphonies - Released September 21, 2018 | Wiener Symphoniker

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Beethoven: Symphonies Nos. 4 & 5

Wiener Symphoniker

Classical - Released January 19, 2018 | Wiener Symphoniker

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Beethoven: Symphonies Nos. 1 & 3

Wiener Symphoniker

Classical - Released September 29, 2017 | Wiener Symphoniker

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Philippe Jordan and the Vienna Symphony Orchestra have been collaborating since 2011, notably releasing their first album of Franz Schubert's final symphonies in 2015. For their 2017 debut on Solo Musica, Jordan and his orchestra have turned to Ludwig van Beethoven's Symphony No. 1 in C major and the Symphony No. 3 in E flat major, "Eroica," performed in concert in Vienna. This is the beginning of a full Beethoven cycle on CD, a first for the Vienna Symphony, and Jordan's second foray into the symphonies, following his DVD release on Arthaus Musik, and listeners will anticipate the series with excitement, considering the vitality and clarity of these performances. The Symphony No. 1 is played in approximate Classical style, with the taking of repeats, minimal vibrato, brisk tempos, and crisp articulation, and though the instrumentation appears to be conventional, the sound is lean and muscular, distinctly not modern in tone or texture. Indeed, the Finale is played with such energy and sprightliness, it could pass as a historically informed performance. The Symphony No. 3 is also performed with a strong period feeling, and despite occasional fluctuations of tempo and touches of rubato, Jordan seems to have avoided the exaggerations of 20th century mainstream interpretations, and brought some pugnacity back to this revolutionary score. The resonant acoustics of the Great Hall of the Musikverein Wien give these performances a luster that enhances the depth of the music without blurring sonorities. © TiVo
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Frühling in Wien (Live)

Wiener Symphoniker

Classical - Released January 6, 2017 | Wiener Symphoniker

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Schubert: Symphonies Nos. 7 & 8

Philippe Jordan

Symphonies - Released August 28, 2015 | Wiener Symphoniker

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Philippe Jordan and the Vienna Symphony performed Franz Schubert's Symphony No. 8 in B minor, "Unfinished," and the Symphony No. 9 in C major, "The Great," in two concerts at the Vienna Musikverein, and released the recordings in 2015 on the orchestra's own label. The performances are solid mainstream interpretations with some influence of period practice, insofar as repeats are taken, tempos are brisk, and the orchestra's sound is lean and bright, even with the use of modern instruments. This is increasingly the way Schubert is played by major symphony orchestras, so the Vienna Symphony really can't be faulted for not taking the plunge into historically informed practices, fully equipped with original instruments. However, the reproduction of both performances is curiously mixed, with a tinny quality in the upper registers of both strings and woodwinds, and the music at times seems filtered at the mixing board, rather than given full, natural tone and presence. If all that's needed is state-of-the-art audiophile technology, then it behooves the Vienna Symphony to upgrade to multichannel recording and the hybrid SACD format to give a better presentation of its sound and to win new fans, because the orchestra's committed playing certainly warrants it. © TiVo
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Dvořák: Symphony No. 9 - Smetana: Vltava

Wiener Symphoniker

Classical - Released May 12, 2015 | Wiener Symphoniker

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Mahler : Das Lied von der Erde (Live)

Waldemar Kmentt

Lieder (German) - Released October 14, 2014 | Wiener Symphoniker

Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 6 in B Minor, Op. 74 "Pathétique"

Wiener Symphoniker

Classical - Released September 9, 2014 | Wiener Symphoniker

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Philippe Jordan and the Vienna Symphony recorded Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 6 in B minor, "Pathétique," in 2013 in the Musikverein Wien, to mark the start of his position as the orchestra's music director. Considering the large number of excellent recordings of this symphony that are available, from all eras and in all formats, one may justifiably ask why another is necessary. But it's worth mentioning that this is a clear-headed and competent reading that conveys the music adequately and with considerable feeling. Unfortunately, the live recorded sound is strangely mixed, with a compressed quality in the high and middle ranges that gives the strings a thin tone, while the winds are much too prominent and bass is only intermittently focused. With some careful adjustments, the sound quality may be improved, but this may prove to be too much effort for the modest rewards of the performance. Because this CD has to compete with an increasing number of audiophile recordings on Blu-ray and hybird SACD, it is likely to be overlooked. © TiVo
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Johann Strauss

Wiener Symphoniker

Classical - Released June 2, 2014 | Wiener Symphoniker

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Mahler: Symphony No. 6

Wiener Symphoniker

Classical - Released February 26, 2013 | Wiener Symphoniker

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Fabio Luisi's 2011 performance of Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 6 in A minor, "Tragic," with the Vienna Symphony Orchestra meets most expectations of a modern interpretation, in terms of tempo, pacing, and expression, and the reversal of the inner movements reflects Mahler's late intentions. This choice is based on the composer's performances after publishing the symphony, not on his original scheme, which places the Scherzo before the Andante moderato. Granted, Luisi indulges his love of rubato, perhaps to excess, and the Vienna Symphony Orchestra doesn't sound especially driven. But the performance has enough coherence and energy to get its salient points across, and enough savagery in the outer movements to stun the unwary listener. Best of all, it offers wonderful sonorities and crisp attacks, and any loss of propulsion or lack of a trajectory is compensated by the orchestra's luxuriating in Mahler's rich orchestration, which offers possibly the most vivid effects of any of his symphonies. The live recording is exceptional for its clean sound, minimal audience noises, and the wide dynamic range, which may require a fairly high volume setting to hear all the details. © TiVo
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Brahms: Symphony No. 1

Wiener Symphoniker

Classical - Released October 29, 2012 | Wiener Symphoniker

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Mahler: Symphony No. 1

Wiener Symphoniker

Classical - Released October 1, 2012 | Wiener Symphoniker

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Fabio Luisi and the Vienna Symphony make a valiant attempt at performing Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 1 in D major, but this recording is a middling effort that is easy to pass over in favor of much better recordings. While the musicians play with warmth and charm, it seems the orchestra as a whole is not fully prepared to perform this demanding score, especially in exposed passages where imprecise playing and faulty entrances are obvious. Careful listening reveals uneven spots in the opening string harmonics, some slip-ups in the woodwinds' falling fourths, and rhythmically loose fanfares, even before the symphony has reached the three minute mark. Similar execution problems occur throughout, but to the untrained ear, they may be easy to ignore if the interpretation is interesting enough. There is some musicality in this rendition, and Luisi is adept at finding the right expressions, even when the technical aspects of the performance are a little rough. But one must remember that this is the rough and ready Vienna Symphony, not the polished Vienna Philharmonic, so expectations should be adjusted accordingly. Also bear in mind that this is the orchestra's own label, so the sound is adequate for a CD but nothing special. With many superior recordings available on the major labels, there is no reason to settle for this average version. © TiVo