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Pop - Released November 21, 1988 | Warner Records

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Pop - Released November 14, 2005 | Warner Records

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Pop - Released April 6, 1990 | Warner Records

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Pop - Released October 1, 1995 | Warner Records

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Hard Rock - Released October 26, 2007 | Warner Records

Booklet
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Jazz - Released March 7, 1978 | Warner Records

Recruiting an entire new lineup of jazz pros, Michael Franks came up with an album with a West Coast jazz base but a New York sensibility. Lyrically a natural follow-up to the slyly suggestive The Art of Tea and featuring less pronounced orchestration than his previous effort, thanks to producer Eumir Deodato, Franks took full advantage of rhythm players Will Lee, Ralph McDonald and Steve Gadd, to make an even funkier record than in the past. Songs like "When the Cookie Jar Is Empty," "Wrestle a Live Nude Girl" and "In Search of the Perfect Shampoo" are all sensually playful songs that fully captured the erotic yet innocent '70s-era of free love with a romantic sense of humor. Not as ambitious as his previous Sleeping Gypsy, but a continuation of his ongoing experimentation with different players and a consolidation of his unique songwriting style. © Steve Matteo /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1989 | Warner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released November 17, 1989 | Warner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop - Released May 12, 2009 | Warner Records

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Pop - Released August 19, 2003 | Warner Records

This EP explores the full range of Seal's talents, and might even be worth considering as a second Seal purchase. There are a few versions of "Killer," including a clubby Trevor Horn remix that highlights Seal's tendency towards dance-pop. There is also a live version of the single, followed by a cover of "Hey Joe." It is not as strong as his version of "Manic Depression" that appeared on the Stone Free Jimi Hendrix tribute album, but it does remind the listener of the debt that Seal constantly acknowledges to Hendrix. The real gem of the EP is the non-album track, "Come See What Love Has Done." For those who love the ballads on his second album, this song completely anticipates the direction that he took. Unfortunately, he took it too far for his third album, and certainly, this EP should be purchased before suffering the mellow bubblegum of Human Being. © Joshua David Shanker /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 15, 2003 | Warner Records

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Soul - Released November 21, 2006 | Warner Records

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Pop - Released January 4, 2005 | Warner Records

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Pop - Released December 11, 2009 | Warner Records

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House - Released September 21, 2004 | Warner Records

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Pop - Released May 25, 2004 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 30, 2009 | Warner Records

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Jazz - Released June 10, 1981 | Warner Records

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Rock - Released May 5, 1995 | Warner Records

Malo's debut album remains their best and best-known work, primarily for the inclusion of the hit single "Suavecito." That track managed to make a Chicago-like pop-soul song sound hip with its smooth integration of Latin rhythms and irresistible "la la la" chorus. However, it represented just one facet of a band who, despite some expected similarities to Santana, played some of the most exciting and exuberant fusions of rock, soul, and Latin music. The six extended tracks (all clocking in at over six minutes apiece) leaned more heavily on hot Latin jazz brass than Santana did, though Jorge Santana himself generated plenty of friction with his burning electric guitar. It's not an exaggeration to state that by the time this came out in 1972, Malo's Latin rock blend sounded fresher than Santana's, if only because they sound hungrier and less formulaic than Santana did by that point. The Santana comparisons are unavoidable, though in this case it's to Malo's credit, as they too boasted a deft balance of improvisatory instrumental passages, solid multi-layered percussive rhythms, and emotional, romantic singing in both Spanish and English. The album has been reissued on CD as one of the discs in Rhino Handmade's Celebracion box set, with the addition of five bonus tracks, though those are merely edited single versions of songs on the LP. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Jazz - Released May 10, 1978 | Warner Records

By the time of his third album, altoist David Sanborn's popularity and influence was growing month by month. Most of these numbers feature Sanborn with an enlarged rhythm section (with such studio vets as guitarists Hugh McCracken and David Spinozza, Don Grolnick or Richard Tee on keyboards, vibraphonist Mike Mainieri, bassist Herb Bushler and drummer Steve Gadd). However, "Short Visit" is something special, for Sanborn was joined by what was mostly the Gil Evans Orchestra; Evans even wrote the chart. Otherwise, this is a typical Sanborn release with plenty of danceable rhythms and the focus on his passionate alto. © Scott Yanow /TiVo

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Warner Records in the magazine