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Jazz - Released January 1, 1960 | Warner Records

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Pop - Released June 1, 1962 | Warner Records

An interesting collection of later Warner Bros. hits, too slick but enjoyable. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1965 | Warner Records

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Pop - Released January 1, 1966 | Warner Records

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Folk/Americana - Released August 1, 1967 | Warner Records

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Pop - Released October 31, 1967 | Warner Records

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Pop - Released November 26, 1968 | Warner Records

Beyond representing the best in '60s California pop, the Association blazed trails in album production and the folk-psychedelia genre. With the guidance of L.A. producers Bones Howe, Curt Boettcher, and Jerry Yester, the band deftly mixed airy harmonies, unobtrusive rhythm tracks, and subtle "Age of Aquarius" accents from harpsichords, Farfisa organs, fuzz-box guitars, trumpets, and bongos -- at times, the sophisticated blend was held together by L.A. session players. And while the group successfully expanded their harmonic horizons on "Requiem for the Masses," they also went a bit beyond their strengths with Jefferson Airplane-esque rockers like "Six Man Band." Luckily, the majority of this hits collection focuses on the band's dreamy combination of polished folk, limber vocal arrangements, and wide-screen instrumental backdrops. The summery program also includes chart-toppers like "Windy," "Cherish," "Along Comes Mary," and "Never My Love," along with progressive pop-and-harmony tracks like "No Fair at All," "Everything That Touches You," and "Time for Livin'." A great introduction to the band's prime work from the latter half of the '60s. © Stephen Cook /TiVo
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Pop - Released April 1, 1969 | Warner Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 1970 | Warner Records

Distinctions Stereophile: Record To Die For
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1970 | Warner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released January 1, 1970 | Warner Records

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World - Released January 1, 1970 | Warner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1970 | Warner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Country - Released January 1, 1970 | Warner Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 1970 | Warner Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1970 | Warner Records

This collaboration between the two light jazz veterans is pretty much what one would expect from an album brought to you by two contemporary jazzmen: pleasant music, technically brilliant, emotionally dead. Pianist James and guitarist Klugh complement each other well on this far-reaching set, but without an iota of attachment to the music, it's really all for naught. © Michael Gallucci /TiVo
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Rock - Released February 28, 1970 | Warner Records

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Pop - Released November 1, 1970 | Warner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
It sold poorly (around 11,000 copies) and the band never cut anything like it again, but Little Feat's eponymous debut isn't just one of their finest records, it's one of the great lost rock & roll albums. Even dedicated fans tend to overlook the album, largely because it's the polar opposite of the subtly intricate, funky rhythm & roll that made their reputation during the mid-'70s. Little Feat is a raw, hard-driving, funny and affectionate celebration of American weirdness, equal parts garage rock, roadhouse blues, post-Zappa bizarreness, post-Parsons country rock and slightly bent folk storytelling. Since it's grounded in roots rock, it feels familiar enough, but the vision of chief songwriter/guitarist/vocalist Lowell George is wholly unique and slightly off-center. He sees everything with a gently surreal sense of humor that remains affectionate, whether it's on an ode to a "Truck Stop Girl," the weary trucker's anthem "Willin'," or the goofy character sketch of the crusty old salt "Crazy Captain Gunboat Willie." That affection is balanced by gutsy slices of Americana like the careening travelogue "Strawberry Flats," the darkly humorous "Hamburger Midnight" and a jaw-dropping Howlin' Wolf medley guest-starring Ry Cooder, plus keyboardist Bill Payne's terrific opener "Snakes on Everything." The songwriting itself is remarkable enough, but the band is its equal -- they're as loose, vibrant and alive as the Stones at their best. In most respects, this album has more in common with George's earlier band the Factory than the rest of the Little Feat catalog, but there's a deftness in the writing and performance that distinguishes it from either band's work, which makes it all the more remarkable. It's a pity that more people haven't heard the record, but that just means that anyone who owns it feels like they're in on a secret only they and a handful of others know. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Hard Rock - Released January 13, 1971 | Warner Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 1972 | Warner Records

Label

Warner Records in the magazine