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Country - Released March 6, 2020 | Warner Records

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Brandy Clark's third album opens with a stunner: "I'll Be the Sad Song," a ballad carried by sweeping strings and melancholy trumpet. It's a little bit country, a little bit Dusty in Memphis, and a whole new style of Americana. Credit goes not just to Clark, whose songwriting has long been smarter than most. Producer Jay Joyce layers on instrumentation, much of it courtesy of the Memphis Strings & Horns, that acts as Clark's equal. High-hat clicks and jaunty horns offer a sarcastically joyous counterpoint to the kiss-off lyrics of "Long Walk" ("Take a long walk off a real short pier, take a cinderblock with you as a souvenir"). Sad piano and buried-deep bass imbue the regrets of "Apologies." Flute, of all things, adds mischief to the delightful Randy Newman duet "Bigger Boat." There's plenty of dark humor as well as exceedingly human pain, as on "Pawn Shop"—starring an old guitar as metaphor for tarnished dreams—and the lush "Can We Be Strangers," with Clark sighing "I don't want to hate you or even care enough to." © Shelly Ridenour/Qobuz
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Country - Released June 22, 2018 | Warner Records

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On their third album, Dan Smyers and Shay Mooney extend their contemporary poetry. Dan+Shay pays tribute to country pop thanks to the balance found by both men during their collaboration. Sensitive but in no way tedious, they launch Alone Together with a punchy drum intro. Perfectly balanced and catchy country rock music, softened by the two accomplices’ smooth and light vocals. An intimate and imaginary universe transpires from their compositions. Sincere and humble, their stories are those of daily lives anyone can relate to, like in the track Tequila. A Proust madeleine of sorts, in which tequila sneakily replaced the madeleine… Love, at the very least romance, are central themes for Smyers and Mooney. Keeping Score therefore comes as no surprise, halfway between Shay and Kelly Clarkson. A romantic ballad introduced by a piano solo and quickly caught up by the union of two voices that seem to be made for each other. But the duo also preserves the musical heritage of a more traditional country music, highlighted in My Side of the Fence intro with a mandolin and steel guitar. A pop country album that radiates youthful energy and preaches harmony among all beings. © Anna Coluthe/Qobuz
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Country - Released October 8, 2013 | Warner Records

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Country - Released March 29, 2019 | Warner Records

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Country - Released November 5, 2014 | Warner Records

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Country - Released April 22, 2017 | Warner Records

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Country - Released September 9, 2003 | Warner Records

Steve Earle subtitled his 2003 live album Just an American Boy an "Audio Documentary," which may be a bit more grand than it deserves, though in all fairness an awful lot had happened with Earle in the 12 years since his last live album, Shut Up and Die Like an Aviator (recorded shortly before Earle's drug habit bottomed out both his career and his personal life for several years), and a lot was going on with him at the time this show was recorded. Always free with his opinions, Earle's 2002 album Jerusalem, which was written and recorded in the wake of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on America, featured a song about "American Taliban" John Walker Lindh, and soon Earle was being denounced as a traitor by right-wing commentators faster than you could say "Dixie Chicks." As Earle himself puts it on this album, recorded on the tour supporting Jerusalem, "Things have been really f*cking weird down South, and they're gonna get even weirder," and he uses much of Just an American Boy to spotlight the progressive political slant that has long been a part of his songwriting, ranging from his moving anti-death penalty ballad "Billy Austin," the labor anthem "Harlan Man," and his call for new people's heroes in "Christmas in Washington" to a venomous screed against "compassionate conservatism," "Amerika V. 6.0 (The Best We Can Do)." While Earle mounts a soapbox through much of this set, his political views fortunately don't take a back seat to his skill as a songwriter, which remains razor sharp, or his vocals, which are craggy but emphatic on these recordings, with Earle and his band (including Eric "Roscoe" Ambel and Will Rigby) revving up a potent head of steam throughout. And Earle still knows a good song and a good laugh on the apolitical side of things, as witnessed by "I Remember You," "Ft. Worth Blues," and his stories about encountering square-headed cowboys named Otto in Schertz, TX. The last time Earle recorded a live double, his voice was about to give up on him and he was running on fumes; Just an American Boy finds him strong, defiant, eager to take a stand, and playing like a man half his age. Maybe that doesn't merit an "Audio Documentary," but it's pretty inspiring, and makes for good listening, too. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Country - Released April 20, 2018 | Warner Records

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Following her debut where she appeared as the new short-lived bimbo of country pop, Ashley Monroe quickly proved she had a strong personality, at times moving away from the path clearly marked out by Nashville. Indeed, the singer from Knoxville, Tennessee, ended up collaborating with Jack White and his Raconteurs, and even founded the Pistol Annies with Angaleena Presley and Miranda Lambert. With The Blade, her third album released in 2015, she confirmed her mastery over a large artistic vocabulary, both with her voice and the instruments chosen. Without revolutionising the genre, Monroe put out an album nicely packed up with contemporary country, filled with effective melodies, and most importantly featuring a voice of stunning purity, inspired by two great untouchables, Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris… Three years later, Sparrow is the work of a more and more adventurous artist, who never compromises to aim for the top of the charts. Produced by brilliant Dave Cobb who worked with Sturgill Simpson, Chris Stapleton, Shooter Jennings, Colter Wall, Zac Brown Band and Jason Isbell, this fourth opus takes country music down paths previously walked by the likes of Bobbie Gentry, Glen Campbell, Waylon Jennings, Rick Hall, Shelby Lynne and even early Elton John. In that regard, Sparrow isn’t a current pop country album, but rather an old-style record. Timeless to be exact. Cobb’s work is in fact remarkable in its tendency to blur, even erase any sign of the current era… “To me this record is about acknowledging past hurt, forgiveness and freedom to move forward. The most terrible things that happen to you are the most beautiful songs. That's what I respect the most about music." Here, Ashley Monroe plays the therapy card. And while she does settle some scores with her mother and even herself, and dive back into her younger years, her album is both introspective and able to touch anyone. Because, much like Alison Krauss, Lee Ann Womack, or even closer, Kacey Musgraves, she is well aware of the emotional potential of this kind of pathos, while always remaining dignified, serene and very classy. This is the main strength of an album that at times doesn’t hold back on violins, but handles them like one would carry nitroglycerin. Highly recommended! © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Country - Released March 1, 1996 | Warner Records

Steve Earle quietly announced he was back in action and capable of making substantial, heartfelt music again with his 1994 acoustic album Train a Comin', but on 1995's I Feel Alright Earle showed he was truly back in fighting shape, and from the album's first moments he sounds ready to roar and holds nothing back. While Earle's battle with drug abuse and his brief stay in prison aren't explicitly addressed on this album (except on the harrowing "CCKMP," in which Earle confesses "cocaine cannot kill my pain" and "heroin is the only thing/the only gift the darkness brings"), the hurt brought to himself and others by his betrayals runs through many of these songs, sometimes with humor ("Hard Core Troubadour"), sometimes with regret ("Valentine's Day"), and sometimes with a painful self-awareness ("Hurtin' Me, Hurtin' You" and "The Unrepentant"). But I Feel Alright isn't about addiction and loss so much as recovery and starting over again, and if the songs often concern Earle's misdeeds, the strength of the music finds him confronting his demons without flinching and conjuring up some of the powerfully muscular rock and affecting country of his life. And like Train a Comin', I Feel Alright shows Earle finding the courage and confidence to make a record just the way he wants, and this may be Earle's finest hour in the studio -- the production is tough, resonant, and a perfect match for the material, the players bring their A game without showboating, and Earle's rough but passionate vocals are pure, honest, and direct on every cut. I Feel Alright affirmed that Steve Earle's brush with oblivion had not only failed to silence him, but he was a more courageous artist when he came out the other side, and no one who has heard this record is likely to argue that point. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Country - Released October 23, 2015 | Warner Records

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Country - Released June 10, 2016 | Warner Records

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Country - Released September 10, 1993 | Warner Records

Twenty tracks from 1969-1973, the period of Tony Joe White's greatest success, including "Polk Salad Annie" and White's own version of his composition "Rainy Night in Georgia." Most of this is quality swamp rock with pop-soul-conscious production; on cuts like "High Sheriff of Calhoun Parrish," it sounds very much like he was trying to achieve a groove in the mold of Bobbie Joe Gentry's "Ode to Billie Joe." Sometimes he gets real down-home in a stomping backwoods blues style that makes him sound a little like a White counterpart to John Lee Hooker, as on "Stockholm Blues." If there's any criticism to be levied against this music, it's in its occasional lack of variety, White mining staple swamp rock boogie riffs for all they're worth. However, few, if any, performers and writers were as skilled as White in doing so, and he has a fine knack for sharp storytelling lyrics. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Country - Released December 23, 2008 | Warner Records

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Country - Released August 24, 2004 | Warner Records

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Country - Released November 18, 2016 | Warner Records

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Country - Released November 27, 2020 | Warner Records

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Country - Released June 16, 2017 | Warner Records

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Country - Released May 20, 2016 | Warner Records

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Country - Released November 3, 2017 | Warner Records

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Country - Released October 30, 2015 | Warner Records

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Warner Records in the magazine