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Albums

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Trip Hop - Released July 25, 2000 | Tru Thoughts

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Trip Hop - Released June 19, 2001 | Tru Thoughts

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Trip Hop - Released June 25, 2002 | Tru Thoughts

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Electronic/Dance - Released June 6, 2005 | Tru Thoughts

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Dance - Released July 24, 2006 | Tru Thoughts

Will Holland, the man behind Quantic, has a way of avoiding those attributes often associated with electronica that lead to criticisms of it being a cold and detached music. Maybe it's because he often uses live instrumentation as well as samples, maybe it's because of what he chooses to explore within his work, or maybe it's just a less tangible talent that Holland possesses, something that repels him from a mechanized sound towards something a lot more real. All of these things are certainly found on Quantic's fourth release, An Announcement to Answer. It's a warm, fun album, full of measured guitar riffs, cascading horns, complex rhythms, and multiple stylistic influences, from his familiar broken beat in "Bomb in a Trumpet Factory" to the salsa of "Sabor"; from the Japanese-inspired flute of "Blow Your Horn" to the loungey house in "Meet Me at the Pomegranate Tree" or to the hip-hop in "Ticket to Know Where." And yet nothing on the record seems forced or discordant or out of place, it all comes together calmly and perfectly and seamlessly, instruments entering and fading out, looped and interesting, the beat staying strong, the vocals, if any (rapper Ohmega Watts and singers Tempo and Noelle Scaggs all contribute), present and important without dominating. There are only two tracks that use solely studio equipment, the opener and the closer, but both -- the airy "Absence Heard, Presence Felt," with its strings from an old French movie, stills of the Eiffel Tower and narrow Parisian streets mixed with modern drum tracks and jazzy horns, and "Tell It Like You Mean It," all held chords and plaintive intensity -- sound as immediate as anything else on the album, and if anything, simply show off Holland's ability in the studio. It's accessible, intelligent, and engaging; yet another impressive display of the power and vitality that electronic music can have if done right, and enough to convince naysayers who may say otherwise. ~ Marisa Brown
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Dance - Released June 15, 2009 | Tru Thoughts

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House - Released October 25, 2010 | Tru Thoughts

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House - Released September 26, 2011 | Tru Thoughts

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House - Released July 2, 2012 | Tru Thoughts

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House - Released October 22, 2012 | Tru Thoughts

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House - Released June 10, 2013 | Tru Thoughts

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House - Released September 16, 2013 | Tru Thoughts

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Dance - Released September 23, 2013 | Tru Thoughts

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Dance - Released October 14, 2013 | Tru Thoughts

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Trip Hop - Released October 28, 2013 | Tru Thoughts

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Dance - Released November 4, 2013 | Tru Thoughts

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Dance - Released November 4, 2013 | Tru Thoughts

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Dance - Released November 18, 2013 | Tru Thoughts

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Dance - Released December 9, 2013 | Tru Thoughts

On Generation, drum and bass legend Peshay underscores the various themes and genres he highlighted on the three-track EP of the same name earlier in the year; in fact, all of those tunes appear here. The big shift for the artist isn't so much in experimenting with musical styles -- he's done plenty of that in the past -- but these two dates mark his first time working with live instrumentalists. One highlight is opener "Bronx Life," with its wash of nocturnal, fingerpopping atmospheres which wed Donald Byrd & 125th Street N.Y.C. project to latter-day Weather Report and mid-'70s Quincy Jones. To recap, three EP tracks are offered here: "Midnight Express," with its strings, hard bassline, wah-wah guitar, and big brash horns is reminiscent of the soundtrack funk laid down by Johnny Pate; "Kickin' It with the Piano Trio" is almost straight-up hard bop, while "Seville," with its tough Latin piano vamp, weds montuno to modern dancefloor grooves. New here are tracks like "Indigo," a fascinating collage of exotic library music, polyrhythmic funk, and post-bop jazz woven through with a wash of strings that confronts the clattering snare, Afro-Cuban piano riff, and rolling bassline. "Sundown" is a quiet stunner highlighted by flügelhorn, flute, break snares, and whispering cymbal washes as tenor saxophone winds through the ether to the fore. This leads into the ingenious, jazz house-cum-post-bop soundtrack feel of "Solar." Most of Generation is indeed based in post-club sounds and textures as it unapologetically hints back to earlier times. But Peshay's ability to layer spaces with dynamics, and weave synthetic and organic sounds seamlessly, makes this set one of his most appealing and possibly timeless offerings. ~ Thom Jurek
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House - Released February 24, 2014 | Tru Thoughts