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Ambient/New Age - Released September 10, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Michael Praetorius saw his most important mission as a composer in the promoting and spreading of the German-language chorale. His collection Musae Sioniae consists of altogether nine volumes and is virtually a complete edition of the Lutheran chorales in every setting imaginable. The Christmas hymns in Musae Sioniae, today just as popular as in that time, were of particular importance for Praetorius. He took greatest care in handling them and presented them often in many different settings. Most of the Christmas hymns selected for this album are also to be heard in different settings, from ornate bicinia and tricinia (in which only two or three of the same voices are used) to magnificent polychorals with two or three choirs, the choral texture so masterful that even the most complicated counterpoint is clearly audible.© SWR Classic
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Classical - Released September 10, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Sir Roger Norrington has been chief conductor of the former Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra (today the SWR Symphonieorchester) for thirteen years. During this time he has caused a stir internationally with what has come to be termed ‘The Stuttgart Sound’: a synthesis of historically-informed performance practice with the technical capabilities of a modern orchestra. Whether in Mozart, Haydn, Bruckner or Brahms, Norrington has sought to capture the performance experience of the time, adjusting the orchestra’s size and seating plan to create an authentic sound without vibrato. The present reissue of Brahms' four symphonies, recorded back in 2005, is no exception to Norrington's artistic credo of keeping as close as possible to the composer's expectations. And one of the main features – beside the "pure sound" without vibrato – are the quick tempi. Brahms left no metronome indications in his symphonies. However, the overall timings left by the Brahms conductor von Bülow are so short, compared to today, that there can have been no very slow tempi in his interpretations. Additionally, Norrington considered also one of the many hints left by another admired conductor and friend of Brahsm, Steinbach: “By all means conduct the opening of BrahmsFirst Symphony in 6. But it must sound in 2”. A German Requiem is one of the most popular compositions by Johannes Brahms. Although the texts are taken from the Bible, the piece is not part of any ecclesiastical-liturgical tradition, it is aimed – as Brahms himself expressly emphasized – at people “who are in mourning” and unlike the "Requiem”, the Catholic Mass of the Dead, it is not a liturgical prayer for the souls of the deceased, but rather intended to console the bereaved.© SWR Classic
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Chamber Music - Released September 10, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released August 13, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Sir Roger Norrington has been chief conductor of the former Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra RSO (today SWR Symphonieorchester) for thirteen years. During this time he caused internationally quite a stir with what got to be called "The Stuttgart Sound", a synthesis between historically informed performance and technical capabilities of a modern orchestra. Whether Mozart or Haydn, Bruckner or Brahms, Norrington's main focus laid on quick tempi, a "pure ton" (that is, vibratoless), articulation, seating plan and orchestra size as experienced by the composers themselves back in their time. With the present re-issue of his Bruckner SWR-recordings, Norrington sought to render the "human face" of Bruckner, not just the quasi-religious abstraction the public is sometimes given instead. His symphonies are secular works written with the Musikverein Vienna in mind. They contain descriptive music (journeys, nature, birds), dance music and humor, unexpected dramatic passages, and pauses. In his entirely individual style (culled from Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn and Wagner, but rarely sounding like any of them), Bruckner echoes memories of his own violin playing as a youth at village weddings, quite as much as those of the St. Florian organ loft. © SWR Classic
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Rock - Released July 9, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released January 1, 2009 | SWR Classic

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The two extended visits in London, in 1791 and 1794, were the greatest triumph in the career of Joseph Haydn. By that time he had already composed 92 symphonies, 12 more came into being while he was in London. The English were stunned by his new masterpieces, which Haydn directed personally. They knew that they were in the presence of the greatest composer in the world. Mozart was already dead and Beethoven not yet known. In September 2009 during the "Europäisches Musikfest" the SWR Radio-Sinfonieorchester Stuttgart and Sir Roger Norrington celebrated the memory of Joseph Haydn by performing and recording live all 12 London symphonies. They focused – with regards on orchestra size, seating, tempo, phrasing, articulation and sound – on historical performing style, their aim being to render the majesty, the folk-like simplicity, the infectious sense of dance, the surprises, and the humor characteristic to the Father of the symphony. © SWR Classic
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Jazz - Released June 11, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released May 14, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Jazz - Released May 14, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Jazz - Released April 9, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released April 9, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released April 9, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released April 9, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released April 9, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released April 9, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released April 9, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released March 12, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Stories about Wunderlich's meteoric rise to success, his incredibly heavy workload or his seemingly effortless acquisition of new repertoire have been told again and again – sometimes painting an idealized and sometimes a distorted picture of the artist. The nine installments of the SWR retrospective that have been released by SWR Classic to this day feature Fritz Wunderlich as a singer of songs, an (unequalled) Mozart tenor, a brilliant interpreter of the greatest tenor hits, a fascinating singer of operettas and as a tasteful interpreter of light music, to name but a few of the genres that made up his repertoire. Though Fritz Wunderlich remains until today a widely appreciated and admired singer, there are some facets to his artistic side that are still relatively unknown. The tenth and last installment presents Fritz Wunderlich as an interpreter of the big works of sacred music, an aspect that has to be considered as an essential part of his artistic profile. © SWR Classic
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Classical - Released March 12, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released March 12, 2021 | SWR Classic

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This is the first orchestral release of the new SWR Symphonieorchester Stuttgart. Not without a reason one has decided to choose a symphony by Shostakovich. This live recording under the baton of the experienced conductor Eliahu Inbal shows the extraordinary level on which this orchestra operates after five years of existence. Shostakovich’s 11th Symphony focuses on the so-called “Petersburg Bloody Sunday”, which – according to the Julian calendar – took place on January 9, 1905. Just like the classical symphony the work has four movements that blend attacca into one another so as to create a continuous narrative flow. There’s no denying that the 11th Symphony is not a symphony in the classic sense but rather a symphonic poem or programme symphony. Shostakovich always needed an overriding subject for his compositions to express the “central idea” of his music. © SWR Classic
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Classical - Released March 12, 2021 | SWR Classic

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A collection of well-known hits ("Schlager") made famous by singers like Joseph Schmidt, Richard Heuberger or Mischa Spoliansky, many of them composed for popular movies of that time. They maintained their popularity until nowadays and are performed on this album by the young rising star from Austria, the tenor Martin Miterrutzner, accompanied by the Deutsche Radio Philharmonie under the baton of Christoph Poppen, who has already established his reputation with original and innovative repertoire. Mitterrutzner is an extraordinary gifted tenor with a wide repertoire from Bach to Britten, whose voice is also perfectly equiped for an exquisite rendering of the emotive hits of the 1930’s. © SWR Classic