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Jazz - Released January 18, 2019 | Sunnyside

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released November 13, 2020 | Sunnyside

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Jazz - Released March 3, 2015 | Sunnyside

Distinctions Top du mois de Jazznews
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Jazz - Released January 22, 2016 | Sunnyside

Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
Teamed up in a trio with bassist Charlie Haden and drummer Joey Baron, pianist Fred Hersch is heard on this date exploring the modern mainstream of jazz. His thoughtful and exploratory solos on such numbers as Ornette Coleman's "Enfant," Jimmy Rowles' "The Peacocks," "What Is This Thing Called Love," "Blue In Green" and three of his own originals (including the title cut) are full of subtle and generally swinging surprises. This CD is a fine example of Fred Hersch's playing. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released May 10, 2019 | Sunnyside

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released October 6, 2017 | Sunnyside

Hi-Res Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
A wonder! This third album from Guilhem Flouzat is an absolute wonder. Nothing obsolete in there, just the truth. Like the unshakeable truth of the Great American Songbook and the thousands of standards that the French drummer is revisiting here. Flouzat here has opted to deal with a few less-publicised numbers like There’s No You by Hal Hopper and Tom Adair, Oska T by Monk, Mrs. Parker of KC by Jaki Byard, When I Fall In Love by Victor Young and Edward Heyman and Walking My Baby Back Home by Roy Turk and Fred Ahlert. A Thing Called Joe is also an offering on the altar of New York jazz and its commonplaces and clichés, which he avoids masterfully. The drummer has clearly learned from his seven years in the Big Apple: he has taken home a wonderful swing and a refined ability to manipulate space and silence. At his sides, the great New Orleans pianist Sullivan Fortner and the Australian double-bass player Desmond White are a lot more than just bodyguards: they are craftsmen assisting him in the restoration of these historic friezes, both respectful of a certain tradition, and truly modern. Real class. © MD/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released July 22, 2016 | Sunnyside

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released August 31, 2018 | Sunnyside

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released May 25, 2015 | Sunnyside

Distinctions Sélection JAZZ NEWS
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Jazz - Released October 12, 2018 | Sunnyside

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama
Even if the Oblique Quartet are moving forward together, Dave Liebman looks like a leader. The fact that his name appears on more than 300 albums and his CV includes “freelancing” for Miles Davis and Elvin Jones, to name but a few, gives an indication to the calibre of this saxophonist from Brooklyn. Fortunately for Liebman, who is now 72 years of age, he quickly succeeded in establishing his own name away from his famous employers. He is joined by pianist Marc Copland, double-bassist Drew Gress and drummer Michael Stephans, who is in fact the real mastermind behind this quartet and adds a Coltrane-esque air to a repertoire essentially comprising of classics, three of which are written by Miles (Nardis, All Blues and So What) and one by Duke (In a Sentimental Mood). Recorded live at the Deer Head Inn in Delawere Water Gap, Pennsylvania, this is a wonderful array of improvisations that were never very well-known or acclaimed. A real instrumental whirlwind to be experienced right the way through in one go. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released July 14, 2017 | Sunnyside

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released May 12, 2015 | Sunnyside

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Jazz - Released April 28, 2015 | Sunnyside

Distinctions Découverte JAZZ NEWS
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Jazz - Released February 3, 2015 | Sunnyside

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Jazz - Released October 2, 2015 | Sunnyside

Hi-Res Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
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Jazz - Released July 24, 2015 | Sunnyside

Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
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Jazz - Released October 28, 2016 | Sunnyside

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released February 17, 2015 | Sunnyside

Distinctions Découverte JAZZ NEWS
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Jazz - Released June 26, 2020 | Sunnyside

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Acclaimed for his deep grasp of the acoustic jazz tradition, pianist Benny Green expands his approach exploring the warm sound of the Rhodes electric piano on 2020's Benny's Crib. Green's move from piano to Rhodes is not without precedent in jazz and certainly evokes the work of legendary players like Bill Evans, Cedar Walton, Tommy Flanagan, and Herbie Hancock, who each adopted the Rhodes at some point in their careers. The album follows his superb 2018 effort Then and Now, and features nearly the same lineup, with bassist David Wong, flutist Anne Drummond, conga player Josh Jones, and vocalist Veronica Swift returning. The sole change is drummer Aaron Kimmel, who ably replaces the estimable Kenny Washington. The pianist's bandmates aren't the only similarity to his previous work, as both the title track and "Harold Land" are Green originals carried over from past albums. In fact, "Harold Land," an urbane midtempo swinger dedicated to the late tenor saxophonist, was recorded by Drummond and Green for the flute player's 2013 album Revolving. Similarly, "Benny's Crib" is reworked from Then and Now, with Swift offering a buoyant reading of the bop-informed melody. Equally compelling are cuts like Green's languid take on Walter Bishop, Jr.'s "Coral Keys," his breezy Latin take on Kenny Barron's "Seascape," and his ebulliently hard-swinging version of Cedar Walton's "Something in Common." We also get a handful of intimate and lushly textured solo keyboard performances by Green, including a sweetly lulling version of Dexter Gordon's "Tivoli," the poignantly romantic "Did We Try," and a soulful take on his own "My Girl Bill." Green has always balanced harmonic sophistication with deeply swinging grooves, and his move to the Rhodes keyboard on Benny's Crib only reinforces these traits. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 29, 2021 | Sunnyside

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A vibrant big band production, Bud Powell in the 21st Century finds pianist Ethan Iverson in joyous celebration of the legendary bebop pianist with Italy's Umbria Jazz Orchestra. One of the prime architects of bebop and modern jazz, Powell lived a troubled life and his musical contributions are often overshadowed by the addiction, racial prejudice, and mental illness he suffered. A boundary-pushing artist in his own right, Iverson shines a light on Powell's music, reinterpreting many of the pianist's classic compositions, as well as drawing inspiration for his own inventive originals. Although best known for his work as a founding member of the genre-bending trio the Bad Plus, Iverson is also well-versed in the acoustic jazz tradition and has collaborated on projects with many of his idols, including Billy Hart, Ron Carter, and Albert "Tootie" Heath. Since parting ways with the Bad Plus in 2017, Iverson has continued to delve into his love of acoustic post-bop, recording albums with Mark Turner and Tom Harrell, all of which reinforces his reputation as an improviser with one ear in the past and one firmly attuned to jazz's future. It's just this sort of balance he strikes on Bud Powell in the 21st Century. Interestingly, although Iverson designed the album as a big band session, he drew his primary inspiration from Powell's classic 1949 small-group recordings featuring saxophonist Sonny Rollins, trumpeter Fats Navarro, bassist Tommy Potter, and drummer Roy Haynes. To help him achieve this sound, he put together his own adept quintet with trumpeter Ingrid Jensen, saxophonist Dayna Stephens, bassist Ben Street, and drummer Lewis Nash. Together, they bring their adventurous and progressive skills to bear throughout. At the top of the album is a two-part Iverson composition, "Bud Powell in the 21st Century 1: Chorale" and "Bud Powell in the 21st Century 2: Continuity." Harmonically lush arrangements, these songs, as with much of Iverson's work here, strike a balance between the acoustic modernism of artists like Dizzy Gillespie in the '40s and the more avant-garde approach of artists like Charlie Haden in the '70s. It's a bold combination and one that allows Iverson to mix lyrical harmonies with extended sections of probing, avant-garde vamp-style improvisations. What follows are equally vivid takes on such Powell standards as "Bouncing with Bud," "Dance of the Infidels," and "Wail," as well as a particularly burning rendition of Thelonious Monk's "52nd Street Theme." Particularly engaging is "Nobile Paradiso," a languid Iverson original that conjures the smoky, urbane jazz clubs of the 1940s in which Powell and his bebop contemporaries developed their sound. While it's almost taken for granted that Powell's music was key in the development of modern jazz, it still sounds as ear-poppingly fresh, especially when played with the passion and inspiration that Iverson does here. © Matt Collar /TiVo