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French Music - Released November 15, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released November 8, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released November 22, 2019 | Sony Classical

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This Berio album is like a little museum dedicated to the Italian composer. Famous for his experiments with musical form which involved working quotations into his pieces, this album, Transformation, sees Berio in the role of arranger. The programme is a series of works arranged for orchestra: a motley collection that runs from Bach to the Beatles, via Falla, Boccherini, Mahler, and Brahms. In it, we hear Berio's affinity for the unfinished, and we also see his love for song, whether the singing is being done by the clarinette (wonderful autumnal colours from Daniel Ottensamer), a baritone (Benjamin Appl) or a soprano (Sophia Burgos). The juxtaposition of the works forms a connecting thread. Is it an echo of the composer's clever patchwork style of writing? In the end it's one of Bach's more fascinating scores that dominates the record. We are taken from one sonic world to the other, each re-invented in turn, expanded but not denatured. We trek across the Spain of Falla and Boccherini: we dive into Brahms and Mahler, two composers that Berio would admire for their science and orchestral sounds, and more specifically the former's clarinet sonata – which became a chamber sinfonia concertante – and the latter's youthful Lieder. Finally, we travel through time thanks to a whip-smart, virtuoso exercise in style: the arrangement of three Beatles songs in the baroque style (although the second version of Michelle tends towards a sometimes-atonal romanticism), all a marvellous fit for the outrageous Cathy Berberian, whose Beatles performances were always free and fantastical. In the pit, the Basel symphonic orchestra with Ivor Bolton conducting. What could be a more natural choice for an artist whose archives are held by the Sacher Foundation? © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
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Film Soundtracks - Released November 22, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released November 8, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Video Games - Released November 26, 2010 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released October 11, 2019 | Sony Classical

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After records dedicated to Berlin in the 1930s, or to the Italy of La Dolce Vita, now Jonas Kaufmann is offering us some sugary Viennese delights, in keeping with the spirit of his 2014 album Du bist die Welt für mich, which covers German and Viennese operetta from 1925 to 1935. This new release rounds off an eternal and unchanging vision of an imagined Vienna. The net is cast wide, with works by Johann Strauss Jr., Robert Stolz and Franz Lehár, matched by pearls from lesser-known composers (Kalman, Zeller, Leopoldi, Weinberger, Benatzky, Kreuder, Georg Kreisler), who each bring their own stone to this monument to the great capital of music. While you might catch yourself humming along to Wiener Blut with Jonas Kaufmann (here with Rachel Willis-Sørensen), this superbly put-together programme offers some pleasant surprises in the form of unknown airs. Most luxurious of all is the discreet, never-invasive accompaniment from the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, in disguise here as an opulent "faubourg orchestra", most ably conducted by the Hungarian Adam Fischer. It's folk music of course, but sung with a supreme elegance and the technique of an opera singer at the height of their vocal and expressive powers. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 23, 2000 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released November 29, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Legendary keyboard and synth mastermind Rick Wakeman delivers his second holiday-themed album, Christmas Portraits, following 2000's Christmas Variations. The album sees Wakeman rearranging classic Christmas carols and songs, such as "We Three Kings," "Silent Night," and "Deck the Halls" for solo piano. ~ Rich Wilson
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Classical - Released May 3, 2019 | Sony Classical

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The brilliantly inventive Francesco Tristano Schlimé is having fun with these Tokyo Stories. The Luxembourgish pianist’s numerous references shine through with primed balance, as if rejuvenated by the artist’s mastery of multi-style collages. While very contrasting, each title flows naturally to the next. Although a minimalist, almost repetitive style is used to full effect, it never hampers the very clear desire to constantly renew rhythms, like in Insomnia, or Electric Mirror that becomes a beautiful tribute to Johann Sebastian Bach, one of Francesco Tristano Schlimé’s idols. The more fragmented style of Pakuchi, with its overlapping layers and light jazz rhythms, appears to veer towards territories of contemporary creation rarely explored by “electro” artists. Tokyo Stories rarely explores – to our great delight – the spacey and meditative atmospheres so popular to the overwhelming neo-classic-pop piano scene. Only momentum and impetus matter here. A stellar album that truly highlights Francesco Tristano Schlimé’s multifaceted musicality at the highest level. © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
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Classical - Released September 28, 2018 | Sony Classical

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"Lang Lang – Piano Magic" is a compilation of a wide variety of recordings made between 2010 and 2014; the album brings together short pieces, and also some of the most popular isolated movements in piano music – which are often played as encores. In a few minutes, each of these morsels conjures up its own miniature universe, as if by magic... Hence the title. While the majority of pieces are brilliantly virtuoso, our pianist doesn't forget to include a few rather less complex moments, which put the emphasis more on softness and solemnity. The magnificent Entertainer by Scott Joplin which closes the album, is played with an offbeat wit and a very personalised idea of rhythm with a few melodic turns which Lang Lang puts a jazzy spin on, as if re-improvising the whole thing on the spot. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released September 7, 2018 | Sony Classical

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Chamber Music - Released November 16, 2012 | Sony Classical

Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released November 2, 1993 | Sony Classical

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Solo Piano - Released October 5, 2018 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Pianist Igor Levit moved from Russia to Germany when he was eight, but there's still a lot of Russian in his outlook: an attraction to the pure virtuoso tradition, and a tendency toward big statements and the big questions. Nowhere has this been more true than on Life, an album that succeeds both thematically and as a thrilling embodiment of late-Romantic pianism at its best. The title, and the contents, refer to the album's memorial function: Levit chose the program to honor a close artist friend who died in an accident. The music is monumental enough to live up to its death-haunted theme, rising out of silence in the Fantasia after J.S. Bach of Busoni and continuing with a remarkably sustained mood of soberness and dignity, punctuated by frenetic outbursts. Busoni is one major presence on the program; the other is Liszt, and the two come together in the Busoni transcription of the Fantasy and Fugue on the Chorale Ad nos, ad salutarem undam of Liszt, originally for organ and an impressive virtuoso task on the piano. So the program works well also as a revival of pure late-Romantic pianism: you can easily imagine that Liszt would have loved this, and loved to play it. A third theme interweaving the works on the program is that of reinterpretation, as in the Brahms transcription of the Chaconne from the Bach Partita for solo violin in D minor, BWV 1004; the fact that Levit has played these works in different orderings in recital testifies to the program's remarkable cohesiveness. There is music by Frederic Rzewski in a memorial vein, and Bill Evans' serene Peace Piece is a lovely conclusion. Bravo!
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Film Soundtracks - Released November 8, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released April 17, 2015 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released August 23, 2019 | Sony Classical

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He was compared to Liszt and to Paganini. For Clara Haskil, Vladimir Horowitz was “Satan at the keyboard”. A homage in the form of a box set brings together never-before-heard recordings, and richly complements and illustrates them with conversations and photos that unveil the man behind the myth. The discography of this thin-skinned colossus, this fascinating artist, is further swelled by a Sony box set with three albums available in digital format: one from his comeback concert, held after twelve years of silence, in Carnegie Hall on 9 May 1965, and two from his rehearsal sessions on 7 and 14 April of that year in the same hall. On the programme: Bach, with no concessions or embellishments in Horowitz’s hands; Schumann, irresistible and fantastical; but also Scriabin, Chopin and Debussy.Imagine Horowitz at the piano, racing his big hands up and down the keys, looking perfectly nonchalant. But his style is all about power, imagination and precision. His initial attack – swift, never hesitating – seems powerful, but also capable of infinite nuance, running from a magical pianissimo to an implacable marcato. His technique is irreproachable: a student of Theodor Leschetizky in Kiev, he learned the piano after the tradition of Anton Rubinstein – and it allows him to sing freely, with a constant attention to the sound; generously and with a loving attention to the text.  The Träumerei, from the Kinderszenen, op. 15, performed at the 9 May concert, at a reserved pace, has him searching the piano for the muted sounds of a journey into memory: it lends the piece a touching flavour of remembrance. But then we are violently awoken by the applause from the audience – retained (amplified?) by Sony (a bit too much?) – which breaks out around the final notes.
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Classical - Released October 13, 2017 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released March 15, 2019 | Sony Classical

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