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Chamber Music - Released August 17, 2018 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
What do you mean, “Six evolutions”? It’s an intriguing title, almost esoteric… The cellist Yo-Yo Ma, who needs no introduction after a worldwide career of some fifty years, pens here his third (and ultimate, according to him) recording of Bach’s Solo Cello Suites. The first, while he was in his twenties, gave rise to enthusiasm, the second—in his forties—gave rise to emotion, so what will this final vision give rise to, now that he is in his late sixties? Serenity and joy, probably, and the completion of a triple discographic evolution. That being said, we still cannot explain the “Six evolutions”, and you will have to dive into a small corner of the accompanying booklet to find an indication, giving little more information, it is true, since it comes with no clarification: 1) Nature is at play, 2) Journey toward the light, 3) Celebration, 4) Construction/Development, 5) The struggle for hope, and 6) Epiphany. Well… Whatever it be, and despite what he said—and the amazing quality of this interpretation—let’s meet in 2038 to find out if he doesn’t decide to give a new interpretation in his eighties! © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released May 17, 2013 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Record of the Month - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année - Exceptional Sound Recording - Hi-Res Audio
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Solo Piano - Released September 1, 2017 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Le Choix de France Musique - Choc de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Sibelius’s piano music remains a secret – chronically neglected or approached from an entirely unsympathetic aesthetic standpoint. Sometimes, criticism is justified. “I will be the first to admit that Sibelius’s piano music is uneven in quality”, says Leif Ove Andsnes, pointing to the composer’s own cynicism towards his piano works as a possible reason for the neglect of the genuine gems. But Andsnes also professes in no uncertain terms that he is “on a mission” to bring Sibelius’s piano works out of the shadows. “I really believe in this music and I want people to hear it”, he says. After scouring every published note of the composer’s piano music, Andsnes has selected works for this recording that speak to him not just as a pianist but as a musician who for a long time has felt particularly close to Sibelius. Here are piano works in which Sibelius’s orchestral thinking advances the language of the instrument even if it can test the technical orthodoxies of the player. As may be imagined, Andsnes masters them with elegance and ease.
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Solo Piano - Released October 5, 2018 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Pianist Igor Levit moved from Russia to Germany when he was eight, but there's still a lot of Russian in his outlook: an attraction to the pure virtuoso tradition, and a tendency toward big statements and the big questions. Nowhere has this been more true than on Life, an album that succeeds both thematically and as a thrilling embodiment of late-Romantic pianism at its best. The title, and the contents, refer to the album's memorial function: Levit chose the program to honor a close artist friend who died in an accident. The music is monumental enough to live up to its death-haunted theme, rising out of silence in the Fantasia after J.S. Bach of Busoni and continuing with a remarkably sustained mood of soberness and dignity, punctuated by frenetic outbursts. Busoni is one major presence on the program; the other is Liszt, and the two come together in the Busoni transcription of the Fantasy and Fugue on the Chorale Ad nos, ad salutarem undam of Liszt, originally for organ and an impressive virtuoso task on the piano. So the program works well also as a revival of pure late-Romantic pianism: you can easily imagine that Liszt would have loved this, and loved to play it. A third theme interweaving the works on the program is that of reinterpretation, as in the Brahms transcription of the Chaconne from the Bach Partita for solo violin in D minor, BWV 1004; the fact that Levit has played these works in different orderings in recital testifies to the program's remarkable cohesiveness. There is music by Frederic Rzewski in a memorial vein, and Bill Evans' serene Peace Piece is a lovely conclusion. Bravo!
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Symphonies - Released October 26, 2018 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
With Symphony No.6 in A Minor "Tragic" written in 1904 (the title, for once, is not a publisher's gimmick, but was indeed given by Mahler in the programme for the first performance in Vienna in 1906), Mahler almost returns to the classical symphony format; we find more voices in the score (a technique that he had already used in No. 5) and a four-movement structure (whereas No. 5 was articulated in five movements thrown into three "parts", with the absence of a programme or philosophical content). Admittedly, the orchestra remains huge, with four woodwinds, eight horns, and six trumpets, not to mention an impressive arsenal of percussion instruments including alpine bells, hammer and xylophone, which he never used elsewhere; in this respect, Mahler contributed to putting an end to the late romantic trend of gigantic works for titanic orchestras. It must be said that the last movement, which lasts at least half an hour, is of a truly tragic expression with its indelible darkness. This frightened the critics, who found the work somewhat bloated. It is therefore up to the conductor to make the score as transparent as possible, the contrapuntal lines readable and the orchestral colours perceptible through the orchestral immensity. Equipped with his MusicAeterna, Teorod Currentzis embarks on the adventure. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released November 12, 2010 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released August 4, 2017 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica
Maryla Jonas, a Polish-born concert pianist, made her U.S. debut at Carnegie Hall in February, 1946. As a newcomer, she received favorable reviews, but the next month Olin Downes, reviewing a recital before a crowded house in the same hall, wrote in The New York Times that “she has few equals as an interpreter among the leading pianists of today”. As a child prodigy, Jonas made her debut in Warsaw at the age of 9 and became a pupil of Ignacy Jan Paderewski. She won an International Chopin Prize in 1922 and the Beethoven Prize of Vienna the next year. She was in bombed-out Warsaw when it was captured by the Nazis, but escaped in 1940, a feat that was described later as “miraculous”. Walking day and night, she traveled 325 miles to the Brazilian Embassy in Berlin. From there, Jonas went to Rio de Janeiro, where her married sister, Mrs. Bertha Holin, then lived, and entered a sanitarium. Later she heard that her first husband, a noted criminologist, her parents and a brother had been killed in Poland. In Rio, Miss Jonas gave up playing for months. It has been said that her fellow countryman, Arthur Rubinstein, induced her to return to the piano. She toured South America to obtain funds to come to New York. Almost five years after her debut at Carnegie Hall, Miss Jonas fainted in the wings of the same hall after leaving the stage part way through her performance of Schumann's Carnaval. She recovered quickly and completed her program. Her illness forced her temporary retirement, but in December, 1956, she gave what was to be her last recital at Carnegie Hall. Maryla Jonas died on the 3rd of July, 1959 at her home of a rare blood disease that had hindered her career in recent years. Her age was 48. Remastered from the original analogue discs and tapes using 24 bit / 192 kHz technology. © Sony Classical
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Classical - Released August 16, 2013 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Art Songs - Released February 14, 2014 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released June 27, 2014 | Sony Classical

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Symphonies - Released January 20, 2017 | Sony Classical

Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released May 17, 2013 | Sony Classical

Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Classical - Released April 15, 2016 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released December 11, 2015 | Sony Classical

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Keyboard Concertos - Released February 14, 2014 | Sony Classical

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Classical - Released March 4, 2016 | Sony Classical

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