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Alternative & Indie - Released October 4, 2019 | Silvertone

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The eponymously titled sophomore album from British family folk trio Wildwood Kin follows their 2017 U.K. Top 40 album Turning Tides. Produced by Ian Grimble, the album sees the band deliver another collection of contemporary, alternative folk numbers. The Ed Harcourt-produced single "Never Alone" is included. © Rich Wilson /TiVo
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Blues - Released June 15, 2018 | Silvertone

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Damn Right ! Who could disagree? Of course Buddy Guy has blues in the blood! The Chicago guitar legend is saying it loud on this album: The Blues Is Alive And Well! At 81 years old, he seems on better form than ever, and has a lot to teach the youth. This is a punkier, rockier bluesman than the present generation, who knows how to bring the blues to a white audience. Old fashioned? The accusation wouldn't offend Buddy Guy, who's just playing his guitar right. Here, the guitarist is discussing the blues with guests who have the stature to hold a conversation with him. Keith Richards and Mick Jagger of the Rolling Stones, Jeff Beck and James Bay feed his talent, and stay in perfect harmony with his genius. And what would be blues without talk of booze and old friends? On Cognac, Buddy Guy seems to shed twenty years when he evokes Muddy Waters. It's too late to sip a brandy with him, but now he's got Keith and others for company. Getting wasted in style, filling up on booze and the blues, dealing out a hand that can't ever end: that's the spirit of the blues. Beyond the music, there is a real discussion that starts between guitar riffs, piano chords and the singer's penetrating voice. Better than a trance, this is a stairway to the underworld opening up. And then there's such a captivating groove on The Blues Is Alive And Well. It's a grand declaration of love for the genre, which, through solitude, poverty and suffering, remains a faithful friend, a life-saver, an intimate journal. Perhaps the album should be seen as a kind of passing-onward of the blues to the generations to come. Blue No More gives a fair account of the idea. It's a duet where Buddy Guy is singing face-to-face with the Pearly Gates. It doesn't dampen his mood at all, through, because he knows that others down below will pick up his baton. And James Bay echoes his master's words back to him: "I won’t be blue no more". © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
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Blues - Released June 15, 2018 | Silvertone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Grammy Awards
Damn Right! Who could disagree? Of course Buddy Guy has blues in the blood! The Chicago guitar legend is saying it on this album:  The Blues Is Alive And Well ! At 81 years old, it seems better than ever, and has a lot to teach the youth. This is a punkier, rocker bluesman than the present generation, who knows how to bring the blues to a white audience. Old fashioned? The accusation would not offend Buddy Guy, who's just playing his guitar right. Here, the guitarist is discussing the blues with guests who have the stature to hold a conversation with him. Keith Richards and Mick Jagger of the Rolling Stones, Jeff Beck and James Bay feed his talent, and stay in perfect harmony with his genius. And what would be blues without talk of booze and old friends? On  CognacMuddy Waters, Buddy Guy seems to shed twenty years when he evokes.It's too late to sip a brandy with him, but now it's got Keith and others for company. Getting up in style, filling up on booze and the blues, dealing with a hand that can not end: that's the spirit of the blues. Beyond the music, there is a real discussion that starts between guitar riffs, piano chords and the singer's penetrating voice. Better than a trance, this is a stairway to the underworld opening up. And then there's such a captivating groove on  The Blues Is Alive And Well . It's a great declaration of love for the genre, which, through loneliness, poverty and suffering, remains a faithful friend, a life-saver, an intimate journal. Perhaps the album should be seen as a kind of passing-onward of the blues to the generations to come. Blue No More give a fair account of the idea. It's a duet where Buddy Guy is face-to-face singing with the Pearly Gates. It does not dampen his mood at all, because he knows that he is going to pick his baton. And James Bay echoes his master's words back to him: "I will not be blue no more". © Clara Bismuth / Qobuz
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Vocal Jazz - Released May 4, 2018 | Silvertone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Qobuzissime
She loves Madeleine Peyroux and Melody Gardot and she doesn't care who knows it. But Hailey Tuck does have a little something of her own up her sleeve. It's a personal touch that makes this young Texan, who has made landfall in Paris, an attractive voice in its own right, and not a pale imitation of anyone else. Larry Klein, who produced her two idols, even agreed to put together the first album of this starlet who shares a hairdresser with Louise Brooks, and a wardrobe with Josephine Baker. Klein even put together a perfect and never over-produced backdrop, with the help of some five-star studio musicians like drummer Jay Bellerose (Elton John, Robert Plant) and guitarist Dean Parks (Joe Cocker, Steely Dan)… In terms of their repertoire, the eclecticism and quality of these covers also displays thoroughgoing good taste. And the fact that she revisits That Don't Make It Junk by Leonard Cohen, Cry To Me, made famous Solomon Burke, Cactus Tree by Joni Mitchell, Some Other Time by Leonard Bernstein, Underwear by Pulp, Alcohol by the Kinks, Junk by Paul McCartney, I Don’t Care Much from the soundtrack to Cabaret and indeed the wonderful Say You Don’t Mind by Colin Blunstone, Hailey Tuck deploys her voice intelligently and with a dash of retro in every word and every phrase. Let this beautiful and timeless Qobuzissime carry you away... © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 18, 2017 | Silvertone

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Turning Tides is the debut album from folk trio Wildwood Kin. Stepping out from the shadows -- the group were originally Seth Lakeman's backing band -- the album sees the trio taking traditional folk and merging it into contemporary pop and rock. © Rich Wilson /TiVo
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Blues - Released July 31, 2015 | Silvertone

Hi-Res Distinctions Grammy Awards
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Blues - Released December 14, 2012 | Silvertone

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 7, 2009 | Silvertone

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Gospel - Released June 23, 2009 | Silvertone

Silage's second album displays an abundance of great hooks, tight harmonies and even the occasional debt to hip-hop -- especially on "Verb," with rapping by Knowdaverb and DJ Form on turntables. Elsewhere, there are plenty of catchy punk riffs in keeping with groups like Everclear or Sugar Ray; while the lyrics are always positive, they rarely overpower the great songs like "Yo Tengo" and "Billboards." © John Bush /TiVo
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Blues - Released July 18, 2008 | Silvertone

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Blues - Released November 11, 2005 | Silvertone

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Blues - Released March 4, 2005 | Silvertone

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
This Grammy-winning comeback set brought Buddy Guy back to prominence after a long studio hiatus. There are too many clichéd cover choices -- "Five Long Years," "Mustang Sally," "Black Night," "There Is Something on Your Mind" -- to earn unreserved recommendation, but Guy's frenetic guitar histrionics ably cut through the superstar-heavy proceedings (Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Mark Knopfler all turn up) on the snarling title cut and a handful of others. © Bill Dahl /TiVo
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Gospel - Released July 20, 2004 | Silvertone

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Pop/Rock - Released July 21, 2003 | Silvertone

For its major-label debut, the Native American quartet keeps its sound bulked up but stripped down. They haven't transcended their obvious Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan-isms, although there are also indications of Robin Trower and '70s power trio blues-rock outfits such as Cactus here as well. Guitarist/vocalist Mato Nanji stays entrenched in the spotlight, with his bass-playing brother, drumming sister, and a practically inaudible cousin on percussion contributing anonymous support. Nanji projects a powerful presence throughout; his dusky vocals are emotional without bombast and his fluid guitar jumps out of the murky mix like a lighthouse through the fog. Production by the British Davey Brothers (the Hoax) plays a substantial role, as they create a thick sonic soup, providing the band with a gutsy wall of sound. The basic tracks were cut live, adding a spark to the performances -- especially the slow blues of "I Wonder" that catches a particularly hot moment -- but some of these songs are not only similar to each other, they are reminiscent of standard blues-rockers in the catalogs of the band's obvious influences. So even though "Take Some Time" is an original, its unhurried shuffle sounds like any of a dozen songs in the Stevie Ray Vaughan catalog. A sledgehammer version of Jimmy Reed's "Shame Shame Shame" is the album's only official cover, though. As the disc progresses, the production and approach become repetitious, and the quality of the material declines. Still, for those who want to turn the volume up to 11, Indigenous competently fills the blues-rock bill. © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
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Jazz - Released June 11, 2003 | Silvertone

Arriving after the unexpected blast of raw energy that was 2001's Sweet Tea, 2003's Blues Singer could idealistically be seen as the acoustic flip side of that high-voltage, raw electric blues. Like Sweet Tea, Blues Singer is supposed to exist deep down within the Delta blues tradition, only finding Buddy Guy armed with an acoustic guitar and the occasional minimal accompaniment; it's even recorded at the same Mississippi studio that gave its name to the 2001 platter and is helmed by the same producer, Dennis Herring. If only it were that simple! Instead of being an extension or a mirror image of its predecessor, this record is a sleepy comedown from an exhilarating peak. Where Sweet Tea was filled with unpredictable song choices, this plays it safe, hauling out such familiar items as "Hard Time Killing Floor," "Crawlin' Kingsnake," "I Love the Life I Live," and "Sally Mae." And while this retains Jimbo Mathus on guitar, when other musicians pop up, it's not the lively Fat Possum crew, it's studio pros like Jim Keltner, or guest shots by superstars Eric Clapton and B.B. King. While this does afford listeners the rare opportunity to hear B.B. on acoustic, it gives the affair the audience-pleasing veneer that weighed down his mid-'90s efforts. Plus, when it comes right down to it, Guy simply is off on this record, with lazy, mannered vocals and by the book guitar. Despite a few good acoustic duet sessions with Junior Wells, acoustic blues is not really Guy's forte, and the highly disappointing Blues Singer illustrates exactly why. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Blues - Released March 6, 2003 | Silvertone

Arriving after the unexpected blast of raw energy that was 2001's Sweet Tea, 2003's Blues Singer could idealistically be seen as the acoustic flip side of that high-voltage, raw electric blues. Like Sweet Tea, Blues Singer is supposed to exist deep down within the Delta blues tradition, only finding Buddy Guy armed with an acoustic guitar and the occasional minimal accompaniment; it's even recorded at the same Mississippi studio that gave its name to the 2001 platter and is helmed by the same producer, Dennis Herring. If only it were that simple! Instead of being an extension or a mirror image of its predecessor, this record is a sleepy comedown from an exhilarating peak. Where Sweet Tea was filled with unpredictable song choices, this plays it safe, hauling out such familiar items as "Hard Time Killing Floor," "Crawlin' Kingsnake," "I Love the Life I Live," and "Sally Mae." And while this retains Jimbo Mathus on guitar, when other musicians pop up, it's not the lively Fat Possum crew, it's studio pros like Jim Keltner, or guest shots by superstars Eric Clapton and B.B. King. While this does afford listeners the rare opportunity to hear B.B. on acoustic, it gives the affair the audience-pleasing veneer that weighed down his mid-'90s efforts. Plus, when it comes right down to it, Guy simply is off on this record, with lazy, mannered vocals and by the book guitar. Despite a few good acoustic duet sessions with Junior Wells, acoustic blues is not really Guy's forte, and the highly disappointing Blues Singer illustrates exactly why. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 27, 2003 | Silvertone

Given the glut of Stone Roses compilations, it's easy to assume that there's already been a collection called The Very Best of the Stone Roses prior to this 2002 release, or at least one that does something similar to its career-spanning overview. No, this is the first disc to run from "Sally Cinnamon" to "Ten Storey Love Song," the first to sketch the band's great promise, glory days, and bewildering downfall. Though there are album versions of songs instead of singles on occasion on this collection, there's nothing rare and nothing that any Stone Roses fan doesn't already have. Nor does it shine as brightly as their debut. That said, the song selection can't be faulted, and the non-chronological sequencing proves that the Roses' lambasted second album did, in fact, have several excellent moments (all of which can be found here) that fit well next to the best of the debut. For that reason, it may be worthwhile for the hardcore, but this is truly for those that want all the singles on one, nicely packaged disc. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Blues - Released May 15, 2001 | Silvertone

Apparently somebody took the criticisms of Buddy Guy's late-'90s Silvertone recordings to heart. They were alternately criticized for being too similar to Damn Right I Got the Blues or, as in 1998's Heavy Love, too blatant in bidding for a crossover rock audience. So, after a bit of a break, Guy returned in 2001 with Sweet Tea, an utter anomaly in his catalog. Recorded at the studio of the same name in deep Mississippi, this is a bold attempt to make a raw, pure blues album -- little reliance on familiar covers or bands, no crossover material, lots of extended jamming and spare production. That's not to say that it's without its gimmicks. In a sense, the very idea behind this record is a little gimmicky -- let's get Buddy back to the basics -- even if it's a welcome one, but that's not the problem. The problem is that the production is a bit too self-conscious in its stylized authenticity. There's too much separation, too much echo, a strangely hollow center -- it may sound rougher than nearly all contemporary blues albums, but it doesn't sound gritty, which it should. Despite this, Sweet Tea is still a welcome addition to Buddy Guy's catalog because, even with its affected production, it basically works. Playing in such an unrestricted setting loosens Buddy up, not just letting him burn on guitar, but allows him to act his age without embarrassment (check the chilling acoustic opener, "Done Got Old"). This may not showcase the showmanship of the artist live, the way Damn Right did, but it does something equally noteworthy -- it illustrates that the master bluesman still can sound vital and can still surprise. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Gospel - Released May 15, 2001 | Silvertone

Solid ninth album from alternative CCM group. Nice mix of musical styles, all with thought-provoking lyrics worthy of Christian listening. "Masquerade" is a standout, a nice feat for the quiet ballad featuring Danielle Young in the lead. Young's voice comes through clear and resonant and the mood is enhanced by the quiet performances of the band members on their respective instruments. The final track, "Ballad of San Francisco," was recorded on the front porch of the Bennett House, a recording studio based in a historical landmark in Franklin, TN. Sound musicianship, lyrics, and production make this an excellent listen all around. © Dacia A. Blodgett-Williams /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 30, 2000 | Silvertone