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Alternative & Indie - To be released May 28, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - To be released May 28, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - To be released May 21, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - To be released May 21, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 20, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 20, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 14, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 8, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 8, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 29, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 23, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 23, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 15, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 15, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 29, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Goat Girl manages to wash universal themes of anxiety—global warming, social injustices, censorship, mental health—in a trance-like bath. The sinister-sounding "Crack" explores the perils of Earth being pillaged by human's wasteful ways; a guiro ticks and tocks like one of those doomsday clocks, but the melody pours like warm liquid. "Anxiety Feels" grapples with the struggle of feeling anxious versus feeling completely numbed out by pills that "fix" the problem, all to a completely chill soundtrack. Opener "Pest" reaches back through time to summon the spirit of Alanis Morrisette circa 1995—those hazy guitars. There's a determined murmur that makes you lean in to hear what's being said ("you're one of those pests from the West," seemingly a chiding of Western insistence on getting involved in the rest of the world's business), but layers on a spacey, bubbling keyboard. Layers (and layers and more complex layers) are the key to this second album from the London female foursome. Guitars noodle and free-form vocals "aaaahhhh" while a wall of violas rev up like an overheating motor on "Jazz (In the Supermarket)." Throughout "Badibaba," nervous drums circle the scene, waiting for something to happen, until the tension finally breaks with a laborious push-pull, ebb-and-flow of guitar that's at once hypnotic and cacophonic. Big and busy "Sad Cowboy" practically vibrates with musical life: metallic drums and plunking '80s synth, deep hand drums and dance floor-throb bass and lonesome-cowboy finger picking. Elsewhere, there is Cocteau-esque moodiness (albeit atop a caffeinated-bounce bass) to "Once Again," and the snappy "P.T.S. Tea" recalls Good Humor era St. Etienne with its attitudinal horns. Singer Lottie Cream keeps it droll or dreamy, backing vocals filter through like rays of sunshine, and most songs dissolve into synthetic squiggles that sound like, just maybe, the robots are winning. On All Fours is, well, a lot. Take a deep breath and dive in. © Shelly Ridenour/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 29, 2021 | Rough Trade

Goat Girl manages to wash universal themes of anxiety—global warming, social injustices, censorship, mental health—in a trance-like bath. The sinister-sounding "Crack" explores the perils of Earth being pillaged by human's wasteful ways; a guiro ticks and tocks like one of those doomsday clocks, but the melody pours like warm liquid. "Anxiety Feels" grapples with the struggle of feeling anxious versus feeling completely numbed out by pills that "fix" the problem, all to a completely chill soundtrack. Opener "Pest" reaches back through time to summon the spirit of Alanis Morrisette circa 1995—those hazy guitars. There's a determined murmur that makes you lean in to hear what's being said ("you're one of those pests from the West," seemingly a chiding of Western insistence on getting involved in the rest of the world's business), but layers on a spacey, bubbling keyboard. Layers (and layers and more complex layers) are the key to this second album from the London female foursome. Guitars noodle and free-form vocals "aaaahhhh" while a wall of violas rev up like an overheating motor on "Jazz (In the Supermarket)." Throughout "Badibaba," nervous drums circle the scene, waiting for something to happen, until the tension finally breaks with a laborious push-pull, ebb-and-flow of guitar that's at once hypnotic and cacophonic. Big and busy "Sad Cowboy" practically vibrates with musical life: metallic drums and plunking '80s synth, deep hand drums and dance floor-throb bass and lonesome-cowboy finger picking. Elsewhere, there is Cocteau-esque moodiness (albeit atop a caffeinated-bounce bass) to "Once Again," and the snappy "P.T.S. Tea" recalls Good Humor era St. Etienne with its attitudinal horns. Singer Lottie Cream keeps it droll or dreamy, backing vocals filter through like rays of sunshine, and most songs dissolve into synthetic squiggles that sound like, just maybe, the robots are winning. On All Fours is, well, a lot. Take a deep breath and dive in. © Shelly Ridenour/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 19, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 19, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 15, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 15, 2021 | Rough Trade

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