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Rock - Released June 12, 2012 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released June 17, 2016 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released September 12, 2011 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released June 4, 2007 | Roadrunner Records

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Rock - Released October 17, 2012 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released June 22, 2009 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released May 4, 2012 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released June 17, 2016 | Roadrunner Records

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
This sixth album by the French extreme metallers is a bold step forward into new territory. Having already cemented their place as one of the best technical death metal bands in history, here they broaden their horizons considerably, experimenting with melody, groove, shorter songs, more straightforward structures, and actual singing. This shift from complexity toward accessibility has seen Magma draw comparisons with Metallica's black album, which Gojira have welcomed. Although they have toned down the complexity a bit, the music is still incredibly heavy, and there are still more ideas in this album than most bands manage in an entire career -- from the Middle Eastern soloing of "Silvera" through the brutal, syncopated drum tattoo that drives "The Cell" to the almost liturgical, monastic vocals on the title track and the incredibly harsh, shrieking, industrial guitar effect that shows up periodically. Opener "The Shooting Star" sets the stage for the rest of the album with a sludgy midtempo groove, multi-tracked vocals, a minor-key melody, clean singing, and a veritable wall of guitar. The title track is one of the most progressive on the record, harking back to the band's old-school days with at least five different sections, and is followed up immediately by the one-two punch of a couple of the album's heaviest tracks -- "Pray," blasting along with grinding, djent-inspired riffage, and "Only Pain," where Joe Duplantier roars into the void over a cyclical maelstrom of guitar. But there's almost a pop feel to some of the material here. Both the music and Duplantier's singing style have a '90s vibe, and the chorus on "Stranded" could almost have come off something by one of the sludgier grunge bands, like Alice in Chains or Tad (who were, incidentally, once described by a British music journalist as "the Metallica it's OK to like"). The album ends in stately near-silence with the acoustic instrumental outro "Liberation." The bulk of the lyrics are inspired by the untimely passing of the Duplantier brothers' mother, a subject that has obviously been the cause of much pain but is also handled with grace, sensitivity, and good taste. This album is not going to give Gojira any big pop radio hits, but it will certainly broaden their appeal outside of the death metal ghetto to more general fans of metal and hard rock. © John D. Buchanan /TiVo
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Rock - Released May 20, 2013 | Roadrunner Records

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Rock - Released October 8, 2013 | Roadrunner Records

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Rock - Released April 9, 2013 | Roadrunner Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released May 18, 2004 | Roadrunner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Besides being an undeniable hip-hop classic, the first album by the cult crew Ultramagnetic MC's introduced to the world the larger-than-life, one-of-a-kind personality of Kool Keith. That alone would make this some sort of landmark recording, but it also happens to be one of the finest rap albums from the mid- to late-'80s "new school" in hip-hop that numbered among its contributors Run-D.M.C., Public Enemy, and Boogie Down Productions. Critical Beatdown easily stands with the classic recordings made by those giants, and it is, in some ways, more intriguing because of how short-lived Ultramagnetic turned out to be. It would be wrong to assume that the finest thing about the album is its lyrical invention. Lyrically the group is inspired, to be sure, but the production is equally forward-looking. Critical Beatdown is full of the sort of gritty cuts that would define hip-hop's underground scene, with almost every song sounding like an instant classic. Although he turns in a brilliant performance, Kool Keith had not yet taken completely off into the stratosphere at this early point. He still has at least one foot planted on the street and gives the album a viscerally real feel and accessibility that his later work sometimes lacks. His viewpoint is still uniquely and oddly individual, though, and he already shows signs of the freakish conceptualizing persona that would eventually surface fully under the guise of Dr. Octagon. If Kool Keith gives the album its progressive mentality and adrenaline rush, Ced-Gee gives it its street-level heft and is, in many ways, the album's core. Somewhere in the nexus between the two stylistic extremes, brilliant music emanated. Critical Beatdown maintains all its sharpness and every ounce of its power, and it has not aged one second since 1988. © Stanton Swihart /TiVo
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Metal - Released September 30, 2013 | Roadrunner Records

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Rock - Released May 20, 2013 | Roadrunner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 16, 2013 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released April 30, 2021 | Roadrunner Records

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When Magma was released in 2016, Gojira unveiled a theretofore hidden facet of the group’s personality: the album, written following the death of the mother of Joe and Mario Duplantier (guitarist/singer and drummer of the group respectively), is a dark introspection shot through with heightened sensitivity and palpable pain. This catharsis set to music no doubt left fans wondering what the follow-up would sound like. The single Another World, released in 2020, gave an early indicator, pointing in a brighter direction which was subsequently confirmed by the groovy and riff-centric Born For One Thing, signalling a return to the group's fundamentals. This proved to be the key for this opus which might just be the triumphant commercial breakthrough of a career that has been in perpetual rise: Gojira meticulously lay out each of the elements which have built their “trademark” sound through the years. Whether it’s raw death (Grind, Into The Storm), more progressive (The Chant, The Trails) or a return to their ethnic influences as on the eponymous title track or Amazonia, Gojira have an immediately identifiable uniqueness. So much so that the four Landes (France) natives can now afford to unleash a Sphinx or New Found, two tracks which are archetypal of their music, without anyone finding fault with it, since the band themselves are the symbolic of these types of combinations. There may not be many surprises, but when viewing Fortitude as a pivotal album, this huge “summary of previous episodes” makes sense. This is a gateway. Because even though the quartet’s work to this point has undoubtedly put France squarely on the worldwide metal map, they’re still miles from tapping into their full potential, a message the group make clear with this seventh clarion-call of an album. Gojira are like a child prodigy grown into an exciting teenage prospect, and now a balanced adult who lives his life as a man. They don't need to show off to be heard: their intelligence is self-evident and has already won them respect. In short, this band is the complete opposite of what our current trash culture offers us. Ultimately, that march against the tide explains why, 20 years after the completely unexpected surprise of Terra Incognita, Gojira’s Fortitude is in full flex, perfectly synthesising the past and looking ever higher and further into the future. © Charlélie Arnaud/Qobuz
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Rock - Released August 9, 2019 | Roadrunner Records

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The masked Iowans sixth full-length effort, We Are Not Your Kind, sees a confidant and apoplectic Slipknot in full command of their craft, delivering a searing 14-track set that's as versatile as it is observant of nu-metal's architectural truisms. Far removed from the desultory aggro-metal being dished out by veteran contemporaries like Saliva and Limp Bizkit, We Are Not Your Kind bristles with both intent and imagination. Corey Taylor and company have weathered their fair share of personal and professional woes over the years -- overdose, divorce, lineup changes, and lawsuits, not to mention an increasingly mercurial musical landscape -- but they have consistently managed to turn misfortune into grist for the sonic mill. After a short cinematic opening, the band gets down to business with fiery lead single "Unsainted," an infectious marriage of melody and might and a juggernaut of stadium-ready rage. The transient "Death Because of Death," with its carnival-like electro-industrial pulses and eerie refrain of "Death because of death because of you," sets the table for the unrelenting groove-laden rap-metal of "Nero Forte." The group goes full-on electro-rock -- think Imagine Dragons-meets-Korn -- on the sleek and sinewy "Spiders," and add twisty, melancholic progressive rock to their arsenal on the surprisingly heartfelt "My Pain" and the turbo-charged High on Fire-esque stoner metal on the uncompromising closer "Solway Firth." More than anything else, We Are Not Your Kind feels locked-in on a personal level -- that aforementioned sense of melancholy resides uncomfortably close to the surface throughout -- and that human touch resonates, even as the band unleashes volley after volley of tribal rhythms, scorching riffage, and fathomless decibels. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 1, 2013 | Roadrunner Records

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Rock - Released September 13, 2019 | Roadrunner Records

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With 25 years of experience and 12 albums under their belt since the release of the eponymous Korn in 1994, what can we expect from the famous band from Bakersfield in 2019? Rightly considered as pioneers of neo-Metal, Korn has experienced many ups and downs. Following a decade at the top of the charts, when their iconic guitarist Brian “Head” Welch left the group it became more experimental, dabbling in pop and dubstep (like The Path of Totality) which left many fans feeling a little bewildered. But Head’s return in 2013 undoubtedly gave the band a new lease of life as they returned to their more conventional style of music. And if the two albums that followed were a sign that they had returned to their high standards, The Nothing goes one step further. From the very first note of the bagpipes in The End Begins, it’s clear that Korn is well and truly back in the game. The album is dedicated to tradition as all the group’s characteristics can be heard throughout the album, (the scat in Cold that is reminiscent of Twist, the sound of the guitar in The Darkness is Revealing, the chorus of “disco” drums in Idiosyncrasy and so on). But The Nothing itself is not immune from trying new things and includes the track Finally Free which has hints of trip-hop as well as the particularly manic H@rd3r, which is a something a bit different altogether. And even if the band hasn’t reinvented itself in this particular album, their knack for riffs and catchy choruses, the manic performances by Jonathan Davis (and the very talented Ray Luzier on drums), combined with a solid production team and just the right amount of experimentation makes The Nothing the go-to album for this ‘third-generation’ Korn. There’s no doubt about it, Korn is still on top form! © Théo Roumier/Qobuz
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Rock - Released April 24, 2020 | Roadrunner Records

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