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Rock - Released November 16, 2018 | Rhino

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Rock - Released April 6, 2018 | Rhino

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Alternatif et Indé - Released April 19, 2014 | Rhino

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Pop - Released June 28, 2019 | Rhino

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Bandes originales de films - Released September 6, 2019 | Rhino

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Rock progressif - Released August 2, 2019 | Rhino

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Yes celebrated their 50th anniversary with a tour through America and Europe, one that is commemorated on Rhino's 2019 set 50 Live. Recorded over two July nights in Philadelphia, 50 Live touches upon material written throughout the band's history but it adheres most closely to the prog rock that made their name in the early '70s. The set is anchored by classics -- "Close to the Edge" opens the album," "Starship Trooper" ends it, with "Yours Is No Disgrace" and "Roundabout" arriving elsewhere -- and the newer material is in the same vein (in other words, there is no "Owner of a Lonely Heart" or "Leave It"). Considering how the 2018 lineup is directed by guitarist Steve Howe, this shouldn't be a surprise, and it has to be said that this incarnation -- which features Howe, Geoff Downes, Alan White, Billy Sherwood, and vocalist Jon Davison, who joined the band in 2012 -- does this sound justice, which makes the album precisely what it's intended to be: a celebration of a particular time and sound, delivered with affection and skill. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released October 6, 2017 | Rhino

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Rock progressif - Released November 24, 2017 | Rhino

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For this one album, ex-Buggles Geoffrey Downes and Trevor Horn were drafted in to replace Jon Anderson and Rick Wakeman. It rocks harder than other Yes albums, and for classically inclined fans, it was a jarring departure; but it was a harbinger of Yes and Asia albums to come. A newly emboldened Chris Squire lays down aggressive rhythms with Alan White, and Steve Howe eschews his usual acoustic rags and flamenco licks for a more metallic approach, opting for sheets of electric sound. Prime cuts include the doom-laden "Machine Messiah" and the manic ska inflections of "Tempus Fugit." Despite the promise of this new material, the band soon fell apart; Horn went into production, Howe and Downes joined Asia, and Squire and White toyed and then gave up on a pair-up with Robert Plant and Jimmy Page, which was to be titled XYZ (i.e., Ex-Yes and Zeppelin). ~ Paul Collins
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R&B - Released May 19, 2017 | Rhino

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Rock - Released November 16, 2018 | Rhino

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Rock - Released July 15, 1990 | Rhino

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One year after ...But Seriously, England's best-selling album in the year of its release, Phil Collins followed up with a live worldwide tour. The former Genesis drummer was at the height of his fame, and this Berlin concert on July 15th, 1990, perfectly documents his impressive performances from that time. Surrounded by four virtuosos (Leland Sklar on bass, Daryl Stuermer on guitar, Chester Thompson on drums and Brad Cole on keyboards), here Phil Collins reveals a kind of ‘best of’ album with the hits Against All Odds (Take A Look At Me Now), One More Night, In the Air Tonight as well as a rather muscular cover of You Can't Hurry Love by The Supremes. Everything here is XL! Brass, rhythm and melodies! And the remastered edition of this live album in 24-Bit Hi-Res quality makes the experience even more powerful. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Rock - Released November 16, 2018 | Rhino

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Rock - Released November 16, 2018 | Rhino

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Pop - Released November 8, 2019 | Rhino

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Recorded at the Royal Festival Hall with the Leo Green Orchestra, BK25 sees British soul musician Beverley Knight perform a live reimagining of many of her greatest hits. Containing orchestral versions of iconic tracks like "Shoulda Woulda Coulda" and "Come as You Are" (as well as three new studio tracks), the album is a celebration of Knight's extensive career within both music and theater. ~ David Crone
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Rock - Released October 11, 2019 | Rhino

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Pop - Released November 9, 2018 | Rhino

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Rock - Released November 30, 2018 | Rhino

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During her early career, Kate Bush released albums regularly despite her reputation as a perfectionist in the studio. Her first five were released within seven years. After The Hounds of Love in 1985, however, the breaks between got longer: The Sensual World appeared in 1989 and The Red Shoes in 1993. Then, nothing before Aerial, a double album issued in 2005. It's taken six more years to get The Director's Cut, an album whose material isn't new, though its presentation is. Four of this set's 11 tracks first appeared on The Sensual World, while the other seven come from The Red Shoes. Bush's reasons for re-recording these songs is a mystery. She does have her own world-class recording studio, and given the sounds here, she's kept up with technology. Some of these songs are merely tweaked, and pleasantly so, while others are radically altered. The two most glaring examples are "Flower of the Mountain" (previously known as "The Sensual World") and "This Woman's Work." The former intended to use Molly Bloom's soliloquy from James Joyce's novel Ulysses as its lyric; Bush was refused permission by his estate. That decision was eventually reversed; hence she re-recorded the originally intended lyrics. And while the arrangement is similar, there are added layers of synth and percussion. Her voice is absent the wails and hiccupy gasps of her youthful incarnation. These have been replaced by somewhat huskier, even more luxuriant and elegant tones. On the latter song, the arrangement of a full band and Michael Nyman's strings are replaced by a sparse, reverbed electric piano which pans between speakers. This skeletal arrangement frames Bush's more prominent vocal which has grown into these lyrics and inhabits them in full: their regrets, disappointments, and heartbreaks with real acceptance. She lets that voice rip on "Lilly," supported by a tougher, punchier bassline, skittering guitar efx, and a hypnotic drum loop. Bush's son Bertie makes an appearance as the voice of the computer (with Auto-Tune) on "Deeper Understanding." On "RubberBand Girl," Bush pays homage to the Rolling Stones' opening riff from "Street Fighting Man" in all its garagey glory (which one suspects was always there and has now been uncovered). The experience of The Director's Cut, encountering all this familiar material in its new dressing, is more than occasionally unsettling, but simultaneously, it is deeply engaging and satisfying. ~ Thom Jurek
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Rock - Released May 19, 2015 | Rhino

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The "+" in the title of Live+ refers to the two studio recordings tacked onto the end of this 2015 live set: a tense, cloistered original called "Tribal," where Jeff Beck spits out squalls of noise over thundering primal drums; and a cover of "My Tiled White Floor," a wash of electronic soul with vocals by Veronica Bellino that feels constructed out of faded memories of Prince. They're nice additions that wouldn't have quite suited 2010's Emotion & Commotion, nor do they quite feel of a piece with the rest of Live+, all recorded on tour in August 2014. Supported by a collection of tight pros -- bassist Rhonda Smith, drummer Jonathan Joseph, guitarist Nicolas Meier, and vocalist Jimmy Hall -- Beck isn't so much interested in resurrecting specific songs from his career as he is in revisiting particular styles and moods, waxing lyrical on "A Change Is Gonna Come" and "Danny Boy," venturing into thick sheets of distortion on "Big Block," transforming the Beatles' "A Day in the Life" into instrumental fusion, and ending with a set of hard blues. It's diverse but not showy: always a wildly flashy guitarist, Beck's flights feel lyrical, not indulgent, which underscores the sense that he used this 2014 tour as an excuse to just get out and play some guitar. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released April 22, 2016 | Rhino

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Rock - Released January 19, 2018 | Rhino

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Following 2015's The Purple Album, on which they covered songs that frontman David Coverdale had originally performed with Deep Purple in the '70s, the enduring hair metallers released this live companion piece recorded on the album's promotional tour. It features rousing renditions of songs from the Deep Purple albums Burn, Stormbringer, and Come Taste the Band, as well as classics from Whitesnake's own back catalog. ~ John D. Buchanan