Your basket is empty

Categories :

Albums

From
CD$12.99

This Is Morrissey

Morrissey

Pop - Released August 31, 2018 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

An odds-and-sods collection in every meaning of the term, the 2018 set This Is Morrissey is a hodgepodge of hits ("The Last of the Famous International Playboys," "Ouija Board, Ouija Board," "Everyday Is Like Sunday"), deep cuts, B-sides, alternate mixes, and live cuts. While this certainly contains good music -- not just the aforementioned hits but nifty rarities like a live version of Lou Reed's "Satellite of Love" -- it's hard to imagine who this compilation is for, as it's not a good intro to Morrissey for novices and serious Moz-heads will already own this stuff. Still, as a listen, it's pleasant. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Never Say Die!

Black Sabbath

Metal - Released January 21, 2014 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

From
CD$12.99

Psychocandy

The Jesus And Mary Chain

Alternative & Indie - Released November 18, 1985 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

From
CD$12.99

Dehumanizer

Black Sabbath

Metal - Released October 7, 2008 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

From
CD$15.49

Don't You Know Who I Think I Was?: The Best Of The Replacements

The Replacements

Alternative & Indie - Released June 13, 2006 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Great as the Replacements were, it's a little difficult to recommend one of their great albums as an introduction to the band. Sure, it's easy to see Let It Be as a masterwork of the '80s underground, capturing the group's ragged humor and heart, but it doesn't quite illustrate the depth of Paul Westerberg's songwriting the way Tim did, even if that record wasn't as ferocious as Let It Be, nor did it have the slick diversity of Pleased to Meet Me -- and none of the three had the raw, raucous kick of the 'Mats' first three albums (they also didn't have the desperate-for-a-hit vibe of Don't Tell a Soul or the sadly beautiful hangover of All Shook Down, but that's another matter entirely). It could be argued that any of those three would be effective intros, but the Replacements truly needed a compilation. Of course, they already got one in 1997, when Reprise issued All for Nothing/Nothing for All, containing one disc of hits and one of rarities, but due to legalities, it had nothing from the band's Twin/Tone work, which meant it had nothing at all from anything before Tim -- a severe handicap for a career overview to overcome. Released nearly a decade later, Don't You Know Who I Think I Was?: The Best of the Replacements trumps its predecessor for the mere fact that it does contain cuts from Twin/Tone -- eight of them, in fact, sampling from Sorry Ma, Forgot to Take Out the Trash, Stink, and Hootenanny in addition to three selections from Let It Be. While it's possible to quibble about the actual selections -- any teenager or college kid of the '80s will likely have a friend that put "Androgynous" on a mixtape, not "Answering Machine" -- these records are well-represented, as are Tim with four songs and Pleased to Meet Me with three cuts, balanced by the two singles from Don't Tell a Soul ("Achin' to Be," "I'll Be You") and a song from All Shook Down, an underrated record that nevertheless feels like the first Westerberg solo album it should have been, so it's rightly downplayed. These 18 songs make for an excellent introduction to one of the major American bands of the '80s, and that alone would have been a nice addition to the Replacements' catalog (not to mention a good appetizer for the forthcoming box set allegedly in the works). But what makes Don't You Know Who I Think I Was? noteworthy for fans is the presence of two new tracks by a reunited Replacements. While this isn't exactly the full-fledged reunion that many fans have longed for -- Chris Mars sat this one out on drums, but he does provide harmonies -- "Message to the Boys" and "Pool & Dive" are perfectly credible, enjoyable throwaways, sounding a bit like if the 'Mats were Westerberg's backing band for 14 Songs. They're not great, but they're loose, silly, and a whole lot more fun than anything Westerberg has been up to since 14 Songs, and a nice coda to an already strong compilation. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Cachaito

Orlando "Cachaito" Lopez

Latin Jazz - Released May 17, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Buena Vista Club mainstay Orlando "Cachaito" Lopez, who is widely regarded as the best bassist in Cuba, could have taken the safe route and recorded a straightforward collection of Cuban son/Latin jazz music. The resulting album may have been a bit predictable and mild, but the high level of musicianship would have ensured a quality product, particularly considering the impressive international cast that appears with Cachaito on this album. To their credit, however, Cachaito and his colleagues were willing to take some chances. Some tracks approach a Cuban version of dub music, as Jamaican organist Bigga Morrison's Hammond prods or Cuban surf guitarist Manuel Galban's instrument reverberates while the bottom drops in and out of the mix. French DJ Dee Nasty even scratches on "Cachaito in Laboratory," a partially successful experiment that yields interesting results even though it doesn't quite gel with the rest of the album. At times the tracks seem more like studio jams than fully realized songs, but the album's overall feel -- self-assured, relaxed, warm, even somewhat jocular -- is quite appealing. The musicianship, of course, is impeccable, including the amazing rhythm section of Cachaito, Miguel "Anga" Diaz on congas, Amadiot Valdes on timbales, and Carols Gonzalez on bongos. Other highlights include Ibrahim Ferrer's cameo appearance on "Wahira," the album's only vocal track; the full orchestral string arrangements by Demetrio Muniz and horn arrangements by James Brown saxophonist Pee Wee Ellis; and "Tumbao No. 5 (Para Charlie Mingus)," which was inspired by the Mingus classic "Haitian Fight Song." © Todd Kristel /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Domination

Morbid Angel

Metal - Released April 25, 1995 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Guitarist Erik Rutan joins the fold on Morbid Angel's Domination and contributes several of his own compositions. The group's sound is better than ever and perhaps a bit more groove-oriented, but this is mostly standard Morbid Angel, with the typical problems: the bass drums are played too fast to be recorded properly and end up sounding like a fast clicking underneath the songs. There is also very little variation on the band's signature sound, and since they rarely give themselves or the audience a rest, their intensity often borders on self-caricature. This will either be just what you want or will strike you as irritating and comically overdone. © Steve Huey /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Kill Uncle

Morrissey

Rock - Released March 5, 1991 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

With Kill Uncle, Morrissey descended into the ranks of self-parody, churning out a series of pleasant but tired alternative jangle pop songs that had neither melody nor much wit to distinguish them. Part of the problem lies with his choice of collaborators. Producers Clive Langer and Alan Winstanley don't provide the appropriately sympathetic backdrop for Morrissey's sly humor, while guitarist Mark E. Nevin is incapable of developing hooks. A few cuts, such as "(I'm) The End of the Family Line" and "There's a Place in Hell for Me and My Friends," stand out, but Kill Uncle is Morrissey's least distinguished record. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Primal Scream

Primal Scream

Rock - Released September 4, 1989 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Primal Scream, in 1989, confounded their fans and foes alike by growing their hair past their shoulders, buying Marshall amps and turning them up to 11, and by showing an alarming tendency to appear in public shirtless. Previously the Scream had been the most precious of indie poppers, Byrds fans down to their fringed jackets and freshly-combed bowl haircuts. However, their major-label debut, a pristine pop record, was a big flop, and after they booted out co-founder Jim Beattie, they were ready to fully embrace rock & roll and all the attitude and noise that came with it. Out went the Byrds, in came the MC5, and Primal Scream was ready to rock. Unfortunately, while the group was capable of whipping up a credible approximation of thuggish hard rock, Bobby Gillespie's fragile wisp of a voice is rather ill-suited to kicking out the jams. The lyrics, while never a strong point for Primal Scream, are pretty embarrassing, too. The song titles alone sound like they were borrowed from Jesse Camp's LP: "Gimme Gimme Teenage Head," "She Power," "Lone Star Girl"! What saves the record are the handful of slow torch songs. Gillespie's shaky vocals are affecting and powerful, the band plays with a dramatically light touch, and Martin Duffy's piano work is stellar. The best song here is "I'm Losing More Than I Ever Had," which is a soul-searching mid-tempo song with a great arrangement filled with slide guitar, horns, and gospel backing singers. It also served as the basis for Andrew Weatherall's mix of "Loaded," the song that really made Primal Scream an important band and helped change the history of indie rock. So get this record for the history and try not to laugh too hard at the lyrics © Tim Sendra /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Viva Hate (Remastered)

Morrissey

Rock - Released March 22, 1988 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Following the breakup of the Smiths, Morrissey needed to prove that he was a viable artist without Johnny Marr, and Viva Hate fulfilled that goal with grace. Working with producer Stephen Street and guitarist Vini Reilly (of the Durutti Column), Morrissey doesn't drastically depart from the sound of Strangeways, Here We Come, offering a selection of 12 jangling guitar pop sounds. One major concession is the presence of synthesizers -- which is ironic, considering the Smiths' adamant opposition to keyboards -- but neither the sound, nor Morrissey's wit, is diluted. And while the music is occasionally pedestrian, Morrissey compensates with a superb batch of lyrics, ranging from his conventional despair ("Little Man, What Now?," "I Don't Mind If You Forget Me") to the savage political tirade of "Margaret on a Guillotine." Nevertheless, the two masterstrokes on the album -- the gorgeous "Everyday Is Like Sunday" and the infectious "Suedehead" -- were previously singles, and both are on the compilation Bona Drag. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

The Eternal Idol

Black Sabbath

Metal - Released December 1, 1987 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

From
HI-RES$16.49
CD$14.49

Never Say Die!

Black Sabbath

Metal - Released September 26, 1978 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$16.49
CD$14.49

Technical Ecstasy

Black Sabbath

Metal - Released September 28, 1976 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Hi-Res
From
CD$12.99

Sings The Complete "Dr. Dolittle"

Sammy Davis, Jr.

Jazz - Released March 7, 1967 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

In what turned out to be their final collaboration, arranger/conductor Marty Paich and Sammy Davis, Jr. recorded what is considered the definitive interpretation of Leslie Bricusse's score to Doctor Doolittle. By all accounts, this 1967 release was an ideal match of composer and artist. Davis' take on Bricusse/Anthony Newley classics "I'm Gonna Build a Mountain," "What Kind of Fool Am I?," "The Joker," and "Look at Her Face" -- among countless others -- provided the vocalist with some of his best-loved and remembered material. Davis documented the collection at Olympic Studios in London, and the facility was perfect for incorporating the full orchestral accompaniment. Davis' animated delivery and uncanny ability as an emotive actor infuse the opening "My Friend the Doctor," "Beautiful Things," and most especially "I've Never Seen Anything Like It" with a palpable sense of drama. This results in the listener being swept up into his performance. The refined and poignant "Something in Your Smile" and the lush "I Think I Like You" are equally affective in Davis' care. He also asserts his renowned versatility and effervescent hipness on the smooth and groovy reading of "Talk to the Animals" at the disc's conclusion. The arrangement could have easily fit as incidental music for Laugh-In, and as such is a mid- to late-'60s time capsule. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo