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Rock - Released March 24, 2017 | Pink Floyd Records

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Originally released as part of the mammoth 2016 rarities clearinghouse The Early Years 1965-1972, 1972 Obfusc/Ation contains all the previously unreleased video from that year, along with a new mix of that year's Obscured by Clouds. The lack of unreleased music -- the compilation also contains a stereo mix of Live at Pompeii on CD -- makes this a comparatively underwhelming set in the Early Years box, but the video makes up for it. There's footage of the recording of Obscured by Clouds, a live performance from Brighton Dome in June, several French news reports, and a 5.1 remix of Live at Pompeii. Even if this doesn't carry the same revelations as the companion sets, it nevertheless has plenty of treasures within its box. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 11, 2016 | Pink Floyd Records

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Originally released as part of the mammoth 2016 rarities clearinghouse The Early Years 1965-1972, 1965-1967 Cambridge St/Ation collects all of the group's unreleased music and film from Pink Floyd's early years with Syd Barrett. Crucially, this contains several legendary rarities that have never seen the light of day, including a set of improvised recordings the Floyd recorded for a film by artist John Latham. Other highlights include the first release of "Vegetable Man" and "Scream Thy Last Scream," but everything on this set is fascinating, whether it's the exploratory live set from Stockholm in 1967 or the stilted blues the band played in 1965 under the name the Tea Set. The visual material -- which is presented as both a DVD and a Blu-ray -- is highlighted by promo clips for "The Scarecrow" and "Jugband Blues," a Top of the Pops performance of "See Emily Play," and the Floyd playing "Apples and Oranges" on American Bandstand with Barrett and Roger Waters being interviewed by Dick Clark afterward. Of all of the Early Years volumes, Cambridge St/Ation is among the best because it fills out portions of their beginnings in a way no other Floyd album does. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released March 24, 2017 | Pink Floyd Records

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Originally released as part of the mammoth 2016 rarities clearinghouse The Early Years 1965-1972, 1969 Dramatis/Ation contains all the known unreleased music and video Pink Floyd recorded that year. During 1969, Floyd released More and Ummagumma, and the first CD opens with songs from More that were heard in the film but not on the album, then it rounds out with a BBC session from May and a performance at Amsterdam's Paradiso in August. A second CD contains an excellent live set of "The Man" and "The Journey" from Amsterdam in September 1969. The DVD/Blu-ray features a London rehearsal of "The Man" and "The Journey," plus a terrific set from Belgium in October -- the highlight is Frank Zappa sitting in on "Interstellar Overdrive" -- along with footage from Germany from earlier that month. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released March 24, 2017 | Pink Floyd Records

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Rock - Released March 24, 2017 | Pink Floyd Records

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Originally released as part of the mammoth 2016 rarities clearinghouse The Early Years 1965-1972, 1968 Germin/Ation covers 1968, the year Pink Floyd spent regrouping after the departure of Syd Barrett. The guitarist can be seen on a performance from Belgium in early 1968, but he and the band are miming on-stage. It is one of several live performances on the visual component (they're available both on DVD and Blu-ray), with the band being seen on various programs from London, Paris, and Rome. On the CD, the band's four single sides from that year -- "Point Me at the Sky," "It Would Be So Nice," "Julia Dream," "Careful with That Axe, Eugene" -- are paired with two outtakes, including "Roger's Boogie" (which does not boogie). The set is rounded out by two BBC sessions, with the first containing early versions of "Careful with That Axe, Eugene" and "A Saucerful of Secrets" under different names. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released March 24, 2017 | Pink Floyd Records

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Originally released as part of the mammoth 2016 rarities clearinghouse The Early Years 1965-1972, 1971 Reverber/Ation contains all the known unreleased music and video Pink Floyd recorded that year. The single CD contains a work-in-progress version of "Echoes" called "Nothing, Pt. 14," plus a BBC session from September. There's greater variety on the DVD/Blu-rays, which contain the quad mix of "Echoes"; a short film for German TV; performances in France, Austria, and Australia; an Ian Emes animation for "One of These Days"; a brief documentary called "24 Hours -- Bootleg Records"; and an interview with the band's album designer, Storm Thorgerson. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 11, 2016 | Pink Floyd Records

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A double-disc distillation of the massive box The Early Years 1965-1972, The Early Years 1967-1972 condenses that 28-disc set into a 27-track compilation. Naturally, most of the real rarities remain exiled to the big box, but that's fair: only the diehards will recognize the importance of Floyd's collaboration with artist John Latham. Instead, The Early Years 1967-1972 tells the same tale as The Early Years 1967-1972 but in an easily digestible form. The double-disc relies relatively heavily on familiar songs -- it opens with "Arnold Layne" and "See Emily Play," perhaps the two best-known Syd Barrett songs, and finds space for "Careful with That Axe, Eugene" and "Free Four" -- but what distinguishes 1967-1972 is that it's the first early Floyd compilation to trace their journey from Barrett's warped psychedelia to the majestic art rock of the early '70s. Some essential songs are missing -- this doesn't sample the albums, after all, so songs as varied as "Astronomy Domine," "Let There Be More Light," and "One of These Days" are all absent -- but the repetition of "Careful with That Axe, Eugene" and "Embryo" illustrates how the band rapidly gained confidence and ambition, which is essentially the story of this compilation and its parent set. Certainly, the details of the box are missed, but on its own terms, The Early Years 1967-1972 is absorbing: it illustrates how Pink Floyd became Pink Floyd. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 8, 2011 | Pink Floyd Records

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Rock - Released November 6, 2001 | Pink Floyd Records

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Rock - Released March 30, 1994 | Pink Floyd Records

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The Division Bell is Pink Floyd's fourteenth and final studio album and was originally released on March 28, 1994. It was recorded in 1993 in several locations, including the band's Britannia Row Studios and David Gilmour's houseboat, Astoria.
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Rock - Released November 22, 1988 | Pink Floyd Records

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Rock - Released September 7, 1987 | Pink Floyd Records

After a protracted legal battle over the rights to the Pink Floyd name, David Gilmour, Nick Mason, and Richard Wright released 1987's A Momentary Lapse of Reason despite Roger Waters' protests. Retaining collaborators from Floyd's past (like producer Bob Ezrin), this Gilmour-led version of the band crafted a number of songs that were as cerebral and introspective as anything Floyd had done in the past. The first single, "Learning to Fly," served as the unofficial anthem for this latest chapter of Pink Floyd. The Andy Mackay/Gilmour-penned "One Slip" uses the requisite bells and whistles along with Tony Levin's impressive stick solo to guarantee it a prominent place in the band's canon. "The Dogs of War" and "On the Turning Away" are perfect commentaries on the conservative mindset shaping the '80s at the time. The former is an ominous screed composed at a time when the Cold War was still a reality, and the latter is a swipe against the self-absorption of the Me Decade. © Rovi Staff /TiVo
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Rock - Released March 21, 1983 | Pink Floyd Records

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Four years separate this album from its predecessor The Wall which placed Pink Floyd at the height of its success. A well named Final Cut (a requiem for the post war dream), which will be the last disc with Roger Waters, solitary author of this concept-album which he interprets in its almost entirety — and the only one where keyboardist Richard Wright does not appear. Like a first solo opus? No doubt... His grandiloquence, put at the service of a frenzied anti-militarism (England and Argentina then clashed in the Falklands), is reminiscent of The Wall of which he reworked certain compositions that were discarded at the time. The result is an essay, lyrical at will.
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Rock - Released November 23, 1981 | Pink Floyd Records

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Rock - Released November 30, 1979 | Pink Floyd Records

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Co-directed by Roger Waters and David Gilmour, The Wall, Pink Floyd's eleventh studio album, was released in the UK on November 30, 1979 on the Harvest record label and in the United States on December 8, 1979 on Columbia. It is the last studio album with the line-up of David Gilmour (guitar), Roger Waters (bass guitar and lyricist), Richard Wright (keyboards) and Nick Mason (drums). In 1977, Roger Waters — singer, bassist, lyricist, composer and arranger of Pink Floyd — sketched on a sheet of paper a wall separating audience and musicians. Based on this projection, he calls on Bob Ezrin (producer of Lou Reed, Alice Cooper, Kiss, etc.) to help him realize his project. A double album with a strong concept was released and was a massive success — more than thirty million copies sold. A real introspection of Waters' life, the album combines fiction and reality through the story of Pink, a young rock star (who in fact symbolizes Waters himself) prey to his demons and who, little by little, builds a chimerical wall around him to cut himself off from the world. This particularly ambitious rock opera essentially bears the emotional mark of Roger Waters (evocation of his absent father, his abusive mother and the rigidity of a school system that traumatized him for life). The Wall was first remastered in 1994 in the UK by EMI. Then in 1997 the Columbia firm remastered the album, with better sound quality than EMI's, to be released in the United States, Canada, Australia, South America and Japan. Shortly after the album's twentieth anniversary, Capitol relaunched the 1997 edition in the United States in 2000 taking over the European remastering, and EMI did the same in Canada, Australia, South America and the United States, Japan. In 2011, the album was painstakingly remastered by James Guthrie (the sound engineer and co-producer of the original album) and Joel Plante, at das boot recording studio located in Lake Tahoe, California. © Qobuz (GG) 
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Rock - Released January 23, 1977 | Pink Floyd Records

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With pigs, dogs and sheep, Pink Floyd’s Animals is a nod towards George Orwell’s classic Animal Farm. Of course, both works are only about one species in the end: Homosapiens. Released in January 1977, the album puts society under the microscope and dissects the ugliness and brutality of human nature. The record came at a time of huge social unrest in England: class tensions were on the rise, unemployment was skyrocketing and racial divide had hit a high-water mark. Anger was in the air and it bled into every corner of Animals. Lyrically speaking, this record holds some of the most unyielding, sardonic and iconoclastic poetry that Waters has ever penned. On the 17-minute epic Dogs we are introduced to the predatory businessmen - the cut-throat corporate stooges who will flash you an easy smile and then stab you in the back. Amid dog barks and relentless guitar strums, David Gilmour unleashes some of the finest solos of his career. They’re bluesy, progressive and brilliantly harrowing. Next up is Pigs (Three Different Ones) which details the ruthless, totalitarian leaders who perpetuate injustice and oppression while maintaining a grip on power. Once again, the instrumentals are dark with dystopian synths, driving bass lines and menacing pig snorts played on a talk box. The lyrics describe three swinish leaders. One of the ‘pigs’ is the morality watchdog Mary Whitehouse while the “f***ed up old hag” who “radiates cold shards of broken glass” alludes to Margaret Thatcher (the leader of the opposition at the time and a target in other Pink Floyd songs). Down at the bottom of the pecking order are the meek, mindless and unquestioning herds of Sheep. Opening with an understated doodle from Richard Wright on the keys, Waters’ stretched-out vocals crossfade into synths, giving the song that warped, hallucinatory feel that the Floyd do so well. Sheep contains a revised version of Psalm 23, continuing the traditional “The Lord is my shepherd” with classic Pink Floyd cynicism: “he maketh me to hang on hooks in high places and converteth me to lamb cutlets”. The album is book-ended by two glimmers of hope in an otherwise bleak world, marking the band’s first love songs. Originally composed as a single track and later split in two, the message on Pigs On The Wing is clear: love thy neighbour, care for each other, because that’s what makes life worth living amid all the bulls**t. An album – and message - that’s just as relevant today as it was in the 70s. © Abi Church/Qobuz
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Rock - Released September 15, 1975 | Pink Floyd Records

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Pink Floyd followed the commercial breakthrough of Dark Side of the Moon with Wish You Were Here, a loose concept album about and dedicated to their founding member Syd Barrett. The record unfolds gradually, as the jazzy textures of "Shine on You Crazy Diamond" reveal its melodic motif, and in its leisurely pace, the album shows itself to be a warmer record than its predecessor. Musically, it's arguably even more impressive, showcasing the group's interplay and David Gilmour's solos in particular. And while it's short on actual songs, the long, winding soundscapes are constantly enthralling. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released March 1, 1973 | Pink Floyd Records

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By condensing the sonic explorations of Meddle to actual songs and adding a lush, immaculate production to their trippiest instrumental sections, Pink Floyd inadvertently designed their commercial breakthrough with Dark Side of the Moon. The primary revelation of Dark Side of the Moon is what a little focus does for the band. Roger Waters wrote a series of songs about mundane, everyday details which aren't that impressive by themselves, but when given the sonic backdrop of Floyd's slow, atmospheric soundscapes and carefully placed sound effects, they achieve an emotional resonance. But what gives the album true power is the subtly textured music, which evolves from ponderous, neo-psychedelic art rock to jazz fusion and blues-rock before turning back to psychedelia. It's dense with detail, but leisurely paced, creating its own dark, haunting world. Pink Floyd may have better albums than Dark Side of the Moon, but no other record defines them quite as well as this one. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released June 3, 1972 | Pink Floyd Records

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Obscured by Clouds is the soundtrack to the Barbet Schroeder film La Vallée, and it plays that way. Of course, it's possible to make the argument that Pink Floyd's music of the early '70s usually played as mood music, similar to film music, but it had structure and a progression. Here, the instrumentals float pleasantly, filled with interesting textures, yet they never seem to have much of a purpose. Often, they seem quite tied to their time, either in their spaciness or in the pastoral folkiness, two qualities that are better brought out on the full-fledged songs interspersed throughout the record. Typified by "Burning Bridges" and "Wot's...uh the Deal," these songs explore some of the same musical ground as those on Atom Heart Mother and Meddle, yet they are more concise and have a stronger structure. But the real noteworthy numbers are the surprisingly heavy blues-rocker "The Gold It's in The...," which, as good as it is, is trumped by the stately, ominous "Childhood's End" and the jaunty pop tune "Free Four," two songs whose obsessions with life, death, and the past clearly point toward Dark Side of the Moon. ("Childhood's End" also suggests Dark Side in its tone and arrangement.) As startlingly advanced as these last two songs are, they're not enough to push the rest of Obscured by Clouds past seeming just like a soundtrack, yet these tunes, blended with the sensibility of Meddle, suggest what Pink Floyd was about to develop into. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 5, 1971 | Pink Floyd Records

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