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Rock - Released August 2, 2019 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Rock - Released July 26, 2019 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Rock - Released July 12, 2019 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Rock - Released July 12, 2019 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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June 27th, 2007 at Amoeba music - the most popular record store in Hollywood - Paul McCartney steps on stage for an undisclosed, 90 minute performance, to a small but eager crowd. The venue is more like the Cavern Club than Wembley, which might have prompted this introductory statement: "Welcome to Amoeba - it's got to be the most surreal gig ever. The management has asked us to point out no shoplifting please”. Cue 21 songs, from his solo discography as well as his catalog as a Beatle. Four of these recordings would be released the same year in a limited edition: Only Mama Knows, C Moon, That Was Me, and I Saw Her Standing There. In 2009, these were republished in a CD version. But 17 other songs had yet to be made available to the public - until today. Backed by a very solid band, with Dave Arch (piano), Rusty Anderson (guitar), Brian Ray (bass) and Abe Laboriel, Jr. (drums), Macca is given free reign to sing his heart out. During the opener Drive My Car, his voice is strong and self-assured; as the show goes on, it is noticeably tinged with emotion. On an exceptional performance of The Long and Winding Road, the moment is crystallized - the sheer adoration of the crowd, and the clear enjoyment Paul seems to be taking out of the performance, clearly lend some sort of magic to the whole thing. Live at Amoeba 2007 is a grand slam from start to finish - usual business for Sir Paul McCartney. © Alexis Renaudat/Qobuz 
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Rock - Released July 12, 2019 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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RAM

Pop - Released March 15, 2019 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Rock - Released December 7, 2018 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Both the public and the press are still getting over Wild Life, the first album that Paul McCartney released with his new group Wings in December 1971. The record was roasted for being very inconsistent... Two years later, Macca released Red Rose Speedway, a piece of work that was considerably more impressive and outgoing to the point that it took him back to the top of the charts, mainly thanks to the single My Love. Like on Wild Life, the singer/bassist is accompanied here by his wife Linda on keyboard, ex Moody Blues guitarist Denny Laine and drummer Denny Seiwell. The group is also joined by Henry McCullough, the ex Spooky Tooth guitarist. Even if certain critics still reproached Paul McCartney for the album being too lightweight, not engaged enough and above all well below the standard of his past compositions, we should appreciate the finesse of some of these melodies and Macca's ability to write catchy choruses. Once again, the eclecticism of the repertoire is sometimes confusing, making it difficult to consider Red Rose Speedway as a real artistic entity. However, some of these compositions are really touching like Little Lamb Dragonfly and Single Pigeon. This remastered deluxe edition, which includes a number of bonus tracks, is an opportunity to rediscover an extra piece of the big Paul McCartney puzzle. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz 
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Rock - Released December 7, 2018 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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The embers of The Beatles are still smoking as Paul McCartney continues to work like a madman. After two fairly successful solo albums (McCartney and Ram), Macca released Wings' first album, Wild Life. From July 25th to August 2nd, 1971, in the Abbey Road studio that he knows so well, he surrounded himself with a tight-knit trio made up of his wife Linda on the keyboard (she co-wrote almost all the tracks), ex Moody Blues guitarist Denny Laine and drummer Denny Seiwell, who was also on the scene for Ram. The ex-Beatle wanted to sign off on the recording of this record in less than ten days to give it a raw feel. The result - which is indeed raw - is quite confusing given the name of its author. And after his works of art from the previous decade, the compositions on Wild Life seem very anecdotal. Upon its release in December 1971, the press unanimously massacred the record.Taking a closer look at the album, Wild Life's repertoire is quite eclectic between Mumbo, with its percussive visceral rock intro, and the reggae cover of Love Is Strange by 50's soul duo Mickey & Sylvia. The album also includes the pleasant folk ballad Bip Bop (which inspired Voulzy and Souchon for the hit J'ai 10 ans) as well as the song that gives the album its title on which Paul and Linda apologise to the animal world with a blend of fairly classic folk rock... Even if Wild Life isn't a masterpiece, it deserves a second listening and some close reassessment. And this remastered deluxe edition with an array of bonus tracks is the perfect opportunity for a second chance. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released December 7, 2018 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Rock - Released December 7, 2018 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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The irony of the first Wings album is that it seems more domesticated than Ram, feeling more like a Paul 'n' Linda effort than that record. Perhaps it's because this album is filled with music that's defiantly lightweight -- not just the cloying cover of "Love Is Strange" but two versions apiece of songs called "Mumbo" and "Bip Bop." If this is a great musician bringing his band up to speed, so be it, but it never seems that way -- it feels like one step removed from coasting, which is wanking. It's easy to get irritated by the upfront cutesiness, since it's married to music that's featherweight at best. Then again, that's what makes this record bizarrely fascinating -- it's hard to imagine a record with less substance, especially from an artist who's not just among the most influential of the 20th century, but from one known for precise song and studiocraft. Here, he's thrown it all to the wind, trying to make a record that sounds as pastoral and relaxed as the album's cover photo. He makes something that sounds easy -- easy enough that you and a couple of neighbors who you don't know very well could knock it out in your garage on a lazy Saturday afternoon -- and that's what's frustrating and amazing about it. Yeah, it's possible to call this a terrible record, but it's so strange in its domestic bent and feigned ordinariness that it winds up being a pop album like no other. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released December 7, 2018 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Rock - Released September 7, 2018 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Rock - Released September 7, 2018 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Rock - Released September 7, 2018 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Rock - Released August 10, 2018 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Rock - Released March 24, 2017 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Rock - Released March 24, 2017 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Paul McCartney must not only have been conscious of his slipping commercial fortunes, he must have realized that his records hadn't been treated seriously for years, so he decided to make a full-fledged comeback effort with Flowers in the Dirt. His most significant move was to write a series of songs with Elvis Costello, some of which appeared on Costello's own Spike and many of which surfaced here. These may not be epochal songs, the way many wished them to be, but McCartney and Costello turn out to be successful collaborators, spurring each other toward interesting work. And, in McCartney's case, that carried over to the album as a whole, as he aimed for more ambitious lyrics, themes, sounds, and productions for Flowers in the Dirt. This didn't necessarily result in a more successful album than its predecessors, but it had more heart, ambition, and nerve, which was certainly welcome. And the moments that did work were pretty terrific. Many of these were McCartney/McManus collaborations, from the moderate hit "My Brave Face" to the duet "You Want Her Too" and "That Day Is Done," but McCartney also demonstrates considerable muscle on his own, from the domestic journal "We Got Married" to the lovely "This One." This increased ambition also means McCartney meanders a bit, writing songs that are more notable for what they try to achieve than what they do, and at times the production is too fussy and inextricably tied to its time, but as a self-styled comeback affair, Flowers in the Dirt works very well. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released March 24, 2017 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Rock - Released March 24, 2017 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Rock - Released October 2, 2015 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Like 1970's McCartney, 1980's McCartney II functioned as a way for Paul McCartney to clear the decks: to experiment and recalibrate in the aftermath of his band falling apart. This means 1982's Tug of War is, in many ways, the very first Paul McCartney solo album, a record recorded not at home but in a studio, a record made without Wings and not co-credited to Linda, who nevertheless is present as a backing vocalist. McCartney recognized this album as something of a major opportunity, so he revived his relationship with Beatles producer George Martin and brought in several heavy-hitters as guests, including his hero Carl Perkins, his Motown counterpart Stevie Wonder, fusion star Stanley Clarke, prog rock refugees Eric Stewart and Andy Mackay, and his old bandmate Ringo Starr, whose presence was overshadowed by "Here Today," an elegy written for the murdered John Lennon. Tucked away at the end of the first side, "Here Today" is bittersweet and small when compared to all the show pieces elbowing each other for attention throughout Tug of War: the grave march of the title track, the vaudevillian "Ballroom Dancing," the stately drama of "Wanderlust," and sincere schmaltz of "Ebony and Ivory," the Wonder duet that helped turn this album into the blockbuster it was intended to be. As good as some of these numbers are -- and they are, bearing an ambition and execution that outstrips latter-day Wings -- much of the charm of Tug of War lies in the excess around the edges, whether it's the rockabilly lark of the Perkins duet "Get It," the later-period Beatles whimsy of '"The Pound Is Sinking," the electro-throwaway "Dress Me Up as a Robber," or the long, electro-funk workout of "What's That You're Doing?," a track that's a fuller collaboration between Paul and Stevie than "Ebony and Ivory." Such crowd-pleasing genre-hopping finds its apotheosis on "Take It Away," a salute to eager performers and the crowds who love them, which means it summarizes not only the appeal of Tug of War in general -- it is, by design, a record that gives the people old Beatle Paul -- but McCartney in general. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine