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Folk/Americana - Released September 5, 2014 | Parlophone UK

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Folk/Americana - Released September 5, 2014 | Parlophone UK

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Folk/Americana - Released November 2, 2012 | Parlophone UK

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Folk/Americana - Released June 29, 2012 | Parlophone UK

Residing somewhere between the Clancy Brothers and the Chieftains, but more raucous in their sensibilities than either of those outfits, the Dubliners have been Irish music's most uninhibited emissaries to the world since the mid-'60s. This album lives up to its title, offering some lusty renditions of drinking songs, rebel songs, reels, and just about every other subgenre upon which this group has built its reputation across the decades. The performances are rousing and rich in sentiment, often joyous, and sometimes angry (depending on the subject). Highlights include "The Old Alarm Clock," "The Rising of the Moon," "Seven Drunken Nights," "Zoological Gardens," "The Fairmoy Lasses & Sporting Paddy" (which shows off the virtuoso side of their playing), and the haunting "Black Velvet Band"." The whole record was worth a follow-up (More of the Hard Stuff), and is still worth hearing, more than four decades later. ~ Bruce Eder
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Folk/Americana - Released June 29, 2012 | Parlophone UK

The follow-up to A Drop of the Hard Stuff, released earlier the same year, is every bit as good, filled with great and spirited renditions of songs about rebellion, whiskey, and independence, plus a sea song or two. This was also the album on which the group introduced its de facto signature tune, "Whiskey in the Jar"." The high spirits and the ebullience of the performances almost mask the fact that these guys are virtuoso players and second-to-nobody as singers -- as a result, the whole album rates multiple listens, even more so than its predecessor. ~ Bruce Eder
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Folk/Americana - Released June 29, 2012 | Parlophone UK

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Folk/Americana - Released June 29, 2012 | Parlophone UK

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Folk/Americana - Released February 7, 2011 | Parlophone UK

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Folk/Americana - Released February 7, 2011 | Parlophone UK

Anderson's mix of folk and rock works best in Jethro Tull's group setting, although one is hard-put to distinguish this album from parts of Tull's two-decade output. ~ Bruce Eder
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Folk/Americana - Released January 17, 2011 | Parlophone UK

This four-disc collection from EMI in the United Kingdom collects the five albums the Edgar Broughton Band recorded for Harvest, as well as a handful of bonus singles and a previously unissued live performance from Hyde Park in London in 1970. Disc one features the band's 1969 debut album, Wasa Wasa, and the single "Up Yours!"/"Freedom," as well as side one of 1970's Sing Brother Sing. Disc two continues with the second side of that offering, the A-side of the "Apache Drop Out" single, and the complete 1971 self-titled album. Disc three begins with 1972's Inside Out, rounded off by the B-sides "Someone" and "Mr. Crosby." It concludes with side one of 1973's Oora. The final disc begins with the second side of Oora and finishes with the aforementioned 45-minute live gig. The albums are all taken from the 2004 24-bit remasters, and the sound is basically up to par. The packaging here is a bit of a problem in that it splits albums up on each of the four CDs, though it does so in complete sides. For the hardcore fans who've already purchased the individual albums, this box presents a bit of a conundrum. The reason is the Hyde Park show -- it's utterly stellar in both sound and performance and necessary for fans. Versions of "Love in the Rain," "Drop Out Boogie" (which is a proto heavy metal tune if there ever were one), and the 16-minute closing jam on "Out Demons Out" are nearly reason enough in themselves for purchasing the entire package. Broughton's knife-edge guitar playing isn't the only highlight; Arthur Grant's bass is on pure throbbing stun and Steve Broughton's drumming, basic as it is, provides enough bottom end on the tom-toms in constant shuffle to provide an anchor for Edgar to take off, letting all those knots in his solos take him into unknown territory. The gig also hosts the added ballast of percussionist/backing vocalist Laurie Allen. The liner booklet features an extended interview with Edgar and Steve conducted by Hugh Gilmour in early 2011, making this one righteous -- and definitive -- compilation. ~ Thom Jurek
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Folk/Americana - Released August 13, 2010 | Parlophone UK

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Folk/Americana - Released February 22, 2010 | Parlophone UK

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Folk/Americana - Released July 1, 1990 | Parlophone UK

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Folk/Americana - Released October 20, 2009 | Parlophone UK

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Folk/Americana - Released August 10, 1992 | Parlophone UK

Less of the Morris dancing, a little less of the ancient instruments approach (though Phil Pickett is certainly not wasted on this album) and a deal more of the updated rock approach to things. This excellent reissue is well worth adding to a folk-rock collection, mind you, with selections that range from the gruffly rough ("Poor Old Horse") to the thoughtful ("Gresford Disaster") and sometimes all the way to the downright jolly -- keeping in mind that outfits such as the Albion Band paved the way for the more worldly malarkey of bands such as 3 Mustaphas 3, Cordelia's Dad and Boiled in Lead. ~ Steven McDonald
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Folk/Americana - Released June 8, 2009 | Parlophone UK

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Folk/Americana - Released May 25, 2009 | Parlophone UK

Folk/Americana - Released January 23, 2009 | Parlophone UK

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A notable improvement on the first effort, with stronger songs and a more thoughtful instrumental approach, although the ISB comparisons remain inevitable. Some of the songs approach more conventional rock and pop construction; the opening "Hawk the Hawker," for instance, could have almost been a Harvest-era Neil Young tune, with its countryish ambience and weepy steel guitar. In hindsight, the group may have done well to modify their British psych-folkie vibe into a straighter rock mode that could have suited them better. The album's now been combined with their first LP on a CD reissue on BGO. ~ Richie Unterberger

Folk/Americana - Released January 26, 2009 | Parlophone UK

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What the Knickerbockers were to the Beatles, or what David Blue was to Bob Dylan, Forest were to the Incredible String Band: a very close mimic of the real McCoy, though not in the same league as far as petty concerns like originality go. On their first LP, the rustic charm is matched, or canceled, by meandering compositions and arrangements that don't really go anyplace interesting. It's now been combined with their second LP on a CD reissue on BGO. ~ Richie Unterberger
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Folk/Americana - Released July 5, 1993 | Parlophone UK

One thing is certain in this uncertain world -- you can trust Ashley Hutchings to do interesting things with various areas of British folk and rock music. In the case of the Albion Dance Band, under its various names, the focus was on mutating traditional English dance and folk music, which led to escapades involving traditional tunes, Morris dancers, double drummers, dance callers, Philip Pickett's entire collection of medieval instruments, and serious rock guitar front lines that tend to leap onto the hay cart and start blazing away. The Prospect Before Us is particularly unusual, even for Hutchings and the Albions -- a number of the tracks were recorded live in the studio, complete with dancing by the Albion Morris Men, an effort that resulted in some especially raucous moments: the bonus version of "Merry Sherwood Rangers" is far more staid than the live rendition that made it to the original version of this album. An essential purchase, we think. ~ Steven McDonald