Your basket is empty

Categories :

Albums

From
HI-RES$21.99
CD$18.99

Pop - Released February 15, 2019 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res
Originally released as part of the comprehensive 2018 box set Loving the Alien, Serious Moonlight (Live '83) is an audio release of the 1984 home video release Serious Moonlight, which itself aired earlier on the cable network HBO. In any incarnation, Serious Moonlight captures Bowie at the peak of his coolly calculated superstardom, streamlining his eccentricities so they are slick yet still a bit strange. It ain't rock & roll, it's entertainment, but that's also the charm of the record: it's big and glitzy, with Bowie acting justifiably proud of his grandiose moves but also performing with a sly, knowing wink. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES$21.99
CD$18.99

Rock - Released February 15, 2019 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res
David Bowie's Glass Spider tour in 1987 rates among the most divisive outings of his entire career, on the one hand standing as a return to the vast theatrical ventures that characterized his early- to mid-'70s concerts, but on the other symbolizing the absolute waste of resources and talent that many critics considered his 1980s output to be. Certainly there was little in the reception to that year's Never Let Me Down album to suggest that his public was even remotely interested in a Broadway-style extravaganza built around the LP's songs, with Bowie's own apparent reluctance to revisit the icons of his most sacred past serving as a deterrent to even the most indulgent fans. Of the 20 songs featured on the Glass Spider live DVD, themselves a very representative sampling of his entire period repertoire, no less than ten were drawn from his last three albums -- that is, Let's Dance, Tonight, and Never Let Me Down itself. The crucial Hunky Dory/Ziggy Stardust/Aladdin Sane sequence, on the other hand, served up just two, "Jean Genie" and, peculiarly, "Time." Add to that crime the sheer magnitude of a stage set that saw Bowie himself positively dwarfed behind grandstanding dancers, overactive musicians, and a monstrous fiberglass spider, and it is not difficult to comprehend why the man's supporters still smirk and look self-consciously away whenever the affair is mentioned. All of which means you have no way of anticipating the sheer brilliance of this DVD. The lack of extras is disappointing -- a few pages of biographical text are the only tangible "bonus." But the feature itself is spellbinding. Filmed in Sydney during the Australian leg of the tour, it captures the band from a vantage point that most fans simply never got to experience -- perfect sound, spot-on choreography, and excellent viewing angles. The narration that linked many of the songs, and was either lost or intelligible at the actual shows, is as clear as Bowie himself intended it to be, and the tight shots of the individual musicians and dancers ensures that not a moment of the action is conducted out of sight. The ensemble introduction to "Fashion" is exhilarating (if a shade preposterous), while the opening of the show itself, with guitarist Carlos Alomar very visually defying the bellowed shrieks of an invisible Bowie, has a wild charm that suggests, if he ever gets bored with guitar-picking, he's got a solid future in silent movies. The spider itself is mesmerizing, the most unexpectedly compulsive on-stage prop in modern rock since the Rolling Stones took an outsized phallus on the road with them. The musical performances, too, are a lot more powerful than reputation insists -- without exception, the live rearrangements are stunning, with a handful of songs (an unexpected "Sons of the Silent Age," a violent "I Wanna Be Your Dog," and a heartfelt "Absolute Beginners") actually competing with their studio incarnations in terms of dynamic and drive. Indeed, the deeper one delves into the performance, the stronger the conviction that, if Bowie had released Glass Spider on CD, instead of hiding it away on VHS alone, history might well have rehabilitated the album around the same time as it began to forgive him the rest of his 1980s sins. © Dave Thompson /TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released September 29, 2017 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released September 29, 2017 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res
David Bowie returned to relatively conventional rock & roll with Scary Monsters, an album that effectively acts as an encapsulation of all his '70s experiments. Reworking glam rock themes with avant-garde synth flourishes, and reversing the process as well, Bowie creates dense but accessible music throughout Scary Monsters. Though it doesn't have the vision of his other classic records, it wasn't designed to break new ground -- it was created as the culmination of Bowie's experimental genre-shifting of the '70s. As a result, Scary Monsters is Bowie's last great album. While the music isn't far removed from the post-punk of the early '80s, it does sound fresh, hip, and contemporary, which is something Bowie lost over the course of the '80s. [Rykodisc's 1992 reissue includes re-recorded versions of "Space Oddity" and "Panic in Detroit," the Japanese single "Crystal Japan," and the British single "Alabama Song."] © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released September 29, 2017 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released September 29, 2017 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res
On the surface, Lodger is the most accessible of the three Berlin-era records David Bowie made with Brian Eno, simply because there are no instrumentals and there are a handful of concise pop songs. Nevertheless, Lodger is still gnarled and twisted avant pop; what makes it different is how it incorporates such experimental tendencies into genuine songs, something that Low and Heroes purposely avoided. "D.J.," "Look Back in Anger," and "Boys Keep Swinging" have strong melodic hooks that are subverted and strengthened by the layered, dissonant productions, while the remainder of the record is divided between similarly effective avant pop and ambient instrumentals. Lodger has an edgier, more minimalistic bent than its two predecessors, which makes it more accessible for rock fans, as well as giving it a more immediate, emotional impact. It might not stretch the boundaries of rock like Low and Heroes, but it arguably utilizes those ideas in a more effective fashion. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES$104.49
CD$90.49

Pop - Released September 29, 2017 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res
The third installment in a comprehensive deluxe reissue series of David Bowie's entire catalog, A New Career in a New Town (1977-1982) chronicles perhaps the most artistically ambitious phase in Bowie's career -- one that began with 1977's Low and concluded with 1980's Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps). Only two other studio albums arrived in this period -- Heroes, which also came out in 1977, and 1979's Lodger -- which means the remaining seven discs in this 11-CD box are devoted to a variety of odds and ends, including two versions of the 1978 double-live album Stage (the original LP track listing, plus a new remaster of the 2005 expansion), the Heroes EP which contains German versions of the lead track, a brand-new mix of Lodger from producer Tony Visconti, and Re:Call 3, which gathers up B-sides, single edits, and other ephemera from this period. Like on its two predecessors, Five Years and Who Can I Be Now, A New Career in a New Town frustratingly does not include any of the bonus tracks from the '90s Rykodisc expansions of these albums -- a situation that seems especially weird in the case of Low, whose bonus "Some Are" wound up as a section of Philip Glass' 1992 symphonic adaptation of the album -- but the pain is mitigated by the vivid new mix of Lodger. Dense and colorful without changing the feel of the original album, the 2017 mix of Lodger helps focus attention on an excellent record that often gets overshadowed by the three albums accompanying it in this box. It's hard to say if it's enough to warrant a purchase of this hefty box, but in either its CD or LP incarnation, A New Career in a New Town is a handsome, alluring, and exceptional-sounding reissue that earns its price tag. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES$21.99
CD$18.99

Pop - Released September 29, 2017 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$65.49
CD$56.99

Pop - Released September 23, 2016 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released May 20, 2016 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released December 4, 2015 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res Booklet
A seventh studio album from Chris Martin’s & Co.! So, how does one approach a new album when your name is Coldplay and you’re about to celebrate your twentieth anniversary? The answer comes to us in the form of ‘A Head Full Of Dreams’, and what a response it is! Coldplay may surprise many with what is an exciting, colourful, even festive effort here, with the group leader insisting it's a record apart from attempts. "It’s our seventh thing and the way we look at it it’s like the last Harry Potter book.” He explains to the BBC Radio 1. “That’s not to say there won’t be another thing one day, but this is the completion of something ... I have to think of it as the final thing we’re doing, otherwise we wouldn’t put everything into it.” And indeed they have – featuring Noel Gallagher, Avicii, Merry Clayton, Beyoncé, Gwyneth Paltrow (former Mrs. Martin) and even a certain Barack Obama (sampled on a title), ‘A Head Full Of Dreams’ moves through pop ballads, dancefloor tracks and even almost crosses over into R&B. © CM / Qobuz
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res
Even though it contained no hits, The Man Who Sold the World, for most intents and purposes, was the beginning of David Bowie's classic period. Working with guitarist Mick Ronson and producer Tony Visconti for the second time Bowie developed a tight, twisted heavy guitar rock that appears simple on the surface but sounds more gnarled upon each listen. The mix is off-center, with the fuzz-bass dominating the compressed, razor-thin guitars and Bowie's strangled, affected voice. The sound of The Man Who Sold the World is odd, but the music itself is bizarre, with Bowie's weird, paranoid futuristic tales melded to Ronson's riffing and the band's relentless attack. Musically, there isn't much innovation on The Man Who Sold the World -- it is almost all hard blues-rock or psychedelic folk-rock -- but there's an unsettling edge to the band's performance, which makes the record one of Bowie's best albums. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res
Ziggy Stardust wrote the blueprint for David Bowie's hard-rocking glam, and Aladdin Sane essentially follows the pattern, for both better and worse. A lighter affair than Ziggy Stardust, Aladdin Sane is actually a stranger album than its predecessor, buoyed by bizarre lounge-jazz flourishes from pianist Mick Garson and a handful of winding, vaguely experimental songs. Bowie abandons his futuristic obsessions to concentrate on the detached cool of New York and London hipsters, as on the compressed rockers "Watch That Man," "Cracked Actor," and "The Jean Genie." Bowie follows the hard stuff with the jazzy, dissonant sprawls of "Lady Grinning Soul," "Aladdin Sane," and "Time," all of which manage to be both campy and avant-garde simultaneously, while the sweepingly cinematic "Drive-In Saturday" is a soaring fusion of sci-fi doo wop and melodramatic teenage glam. He lets his paranoia slip through in the clenched rhythms of "Panic in Detroit," as well as on his oddly clueless cover of "Let's Spend the Night Together." For all the pleasures on Aladdin Sane, there's no distinctive sound or theme to make the album cohesive; it's Bowie riding the wake of Ziggy Stardust, which means there's a wealth of classic material here, but not enough focus to make the album itself a classic. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES$77.49
CD$67.49

Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res Booklet
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released April 18, 2015 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released April 18, 2015 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released April 18, 2015 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res

Label

Parlophone UK in the magazine
  • Hip-Hop Uncanny Versatility!
    Hip-Hop Uncanny Versatility! Like many of her peers, Ashnikko's career started on TikTok. The North Carolina artist's 2019 song "Stupid" blew up on the dance challenge platform and made her a main character in the emerging wav...
  • After Bowie: 5 Years On
    After Bowie: 5 Years On Five years after his death, the Thin White Duke continues to captivate fans and his albums remain a major source of inspiration for many artists...