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Classical - Released May 17, 2019 | Pan Classics

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Classical - Released July 17, 2020 | Pan Classics

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Classical - Released May 22, 2020 | Pan Classics

Booklet
The autograph reference "Per la Sig.ra Geltruda" on the manuscript of Vivaldi's motet Clarae stellae, scintillate has long aroused the curiosity of researchers. By years of research around the Vivaldi expert Michael Talbot is now revealed who this "Signora Geltruda" is: Geltruda della Violetta was a girl from the Venetian orphanage La Pietà, where Vivaldi worked for over a decade. Geltruda probably had an exceptionally beautiful voice that quickly attracted the interest of important personalities. Vivaldi's motet dedicated to Geltrude was commissioned by the Marquis Bentivoglio of Ferrara, who was Geltrude's patron. The unusual voice of Geltruda is described as being particularly delicate and was probably especially effective in expressive and less virtuoso pieces. This style of writing is also found in other pieces by Vivaldi, most likely also written for Geltruda. The experienced contralto Alessandra Visentin is active at many of Europe's major opera houses and presents here with her first solo album a special jewel in terms of repertoire and interpretation. © Pan Classics
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Classical - Released March 20, 2020 | Pan Classics

Booklet
The 17th century was marked on the one hand by war, infirmity and devastation, but at the same time by great innovations in research and science. In music, which until then had been characterized by structure and order, new ideals such as virtuosity and emotionality developed and created an antipole to the problems of the time. The new view of "Beauty - Belezza" places Lina Tur Bonet at the centre of her very personal programme, which brings together what she considers to be the most beautiful and stirring violin works of the period, presented in her own virtuoso and highly emotional style of playing. © Pan Classics
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Choral Music (Choirs) - Released November 15, 2019 | Pan Classics

Booklet
An organist at the Spanish court during the reign of Philip V, José de Nebra wrote successful operas and zarzuelas (Spanish operettas). He also gave the world some religious music, which is slowly emerging from obscurity. He wrote this Requiem in 1758, for the funeral of the Queen of Spain Doña Bárbara de Braganza, a remarkable harpsichord player who studied under Domenico Scarlatti, and to whom the latter's famous 555 sonatas were dedicated. Made in the memory of the conductor Jesús López Cobos with whom José Antonio Montaño worked closely, this world-first recording of the Requiem by José de Nebra was made following a concert that marked 250 years since the death of the composer, who is thought to be one of the most important of 18th Century Spain. José Antonio Montaño conducts three ensembles whose recordings are touchstones in Spain: La Madrileña, an ensemble of period instruments which he himself founded; the Victoria Choir, which specialise in Renaissance polyphony and the Schola Antiqua which focuses closely on Gregorian chant. José de Nebra's liturgical music has survived in manuscript forum in the archives of the Royal Chapel of Madrid and it has not yet been fully published, or indeed even catalogued. Some of it can also be found in the archives of Rome's Sistine Chapel, in Munich, in Montserrat and in the Cathedral at Valladolid. A great deal of musicological work remains to be done, in light of the sheer quantity of works to be used. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 1, 2013 | Pan Classics

Booklet
Evgeni Koroliov recorded Sergey Prokofiev's Piano Sonata No. 2 in D minor, the Piano Sonata No. 4 in C minor, and the Piano Sonata No. 7 in B flat major between 2002 and 2003 for German release, though this 2013 reissue finds a wider international audience, thanks to Sony's distribution. In these incisive performances. Koroliov explores three distinct phases of Prokofiev's output: the retrospective, almost nostalgic, attitude of the earliest sonatas, drawn from his youthful sketches; a more polished, sophisticated style in evidence in the middle sonatas; and the maturity of the "War Sonatas," which dated from WWII. Prokofiev's rhetoric seems always to have incorporated a sardonic or detached perspective, and this attitude is reflected in Koroliov's bitingly percussive playing, though it is overemphasized at the expense of Prokofiev's humor and playfulness. The shallow "recital hall" sound of the recording also gives a brittle quality to the piano, so the sonatas sound unnecessarily cold and metallic in the loudest passages, and a bit distant and hazy in the softer passages. Closer microphone placement would have given the music some much needed warmth and resonance. © TiVo
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Chamber Music - Released October 18, 2019 | Pan Classics

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Chamber Music - Released June 21, 2019 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released September 21, 2018 | Pan Classics

Booklet
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Classical - Released September 15, 2017 | Pan Classics

Booklet
The six Sonates pour le violon et pour le clavecin by Elisabeth-Claude Jacquet de La Guerre (1665- 1729), dedicated to Louis XIV, were published in Paris in 1707 - the  very year  when  the  models  and  the  most  recent invenzioni of  the  Italian  sonata  arrived in  France. But it appears that as early as 1695 Elisabeth had sent a copy of at least two sonatas to her friend Sébastien de Brossard, thus making it possible to bring forward significantly the date of composition of at least part of the anthology, making this one of the first French examples of sonatas for violin and basso continuo. An outstanding and influential personality in the French musical world, Elisabeth Jacquet was a harpsichordist, organist, singer and composer, and was presented in the court of the Sun King aged just five. In 1677, the French periodical Mercure galant even defined her as the marvel of our century, capable of truly musical miracles. Educated and growing up in Versailles under the protection of Madame de Montespan, a favourite of the king, in 1684 Elisabeth married the organist Marin de La Guerre, and continued her musical activity in Paris as teacher and composer. The markedly novel nature and the original, daring, harmonic sonorities (not mentioning the importance of the bass line, often independent and contrapuntal with the violin part) distinguishing these sonatas were grasped and recognised immediately by the public of the time: that same Mercure galant – revue which, on a number of occasions followed the development of de la Guerre, praising her and reflecting the success obtained at court – described the Sonates as works of great originality, attractive not just because they adjust to the formal parameters, taste and the aesthetics of the time; not merely beautiful works in their own right, but music which is uncommon and marvellous, refined, gracious yet audacious, its melodic lines intimately and essentially based on the principle contrast. Thus the musical text flowers from the continuing conflict between traditional composition, the practice of habitual ornamentation, and above all free experimentation, subjecting the listener to changes of tempo and metre, harmonic daring and sharp expressive contrasts.
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Classical - Released May 26, 2015 | Pan Classics

Booklet
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Classical - Released May 17, 2019 | Pan Classics

Booklet
Georg Muffat (1653-1704) after studying as a youngster with Lully in Paris, was involved most of his life with the Catholic Church. He worked as cathedral organist in Alsace, moved to Bavaria as a law student, and then settled for a time in Vienna. Following employment as organist to the Archbishop of Salzburg, interrupted by a period of study in Rome with the renowned keyboard player, Bernardo Pasquini, he took a final position as organist to the Bishop of Passau. Among his compositions is the Armonico Tributo of 1682, five multi-movement, five-voice sonatas which Muffat left open as to various instrumental possibilities, even including performance as concerti grossi. One easily hears the influence of Corelli, whom Muffat met while in Rome, but there are also moments when one surmises that Handel knew these scores well. The music, perfectly gorgeous in this smaller instrumental version, mixes the French and Italian styles, as well as chamber-sonata and sonata da chiesa movements. © Pan Classics
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Violin Concertos - Released April 29, 2016 | Pan Classics

Booklet
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Classical - Released September 18, 2020 | Pan Classics

Booklet
Before the history of the string quartet entered its "classical" phase with Luigi Boccherini in Paris and Joseph Haydn in Vienna, it went through a long process of development marked by exciting experiments and compositional freedom. Italian composers in particular have distinguished themselves in this process and so the programme of Musica Fiorita presents special works by Italian composers from a period of about 100 years. Beginning with two works by Giovanni Maria Bononcini (the father of the famous Giovanni Battista), the development from a continuo accompanied to a continuo free quartet is shown. Alessandro Scarlatti is represented with four quartets from his late work, in which the opera composer turns to polyphonic part writing in an unusually complex and harmonically expressive way. Two compositions by the Italian Maddalena Laura Lombardini Sirmen, which represent the early classical phase of the string quartet, conclude the programme. © Pan Classics
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Duets - Released April 5, 2019 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Enrico Onofri discovered Bartók’s pedagogical piece 44 Duets for two cellos while he was studying in Italy under Hungarian master violinist Sándor Végh. Onofri took his time to prepare his project and looked for the ideal partner. When he met Lina Tur Bonet, then, he knew he had found her. Both violinists come from a baroque background and they both love Bartók.  Bartók composed the piece in 1931 following the suggestion of a German professor who needed a cycle for two violins without accompaniment. The initial agreement called for the rearrangement of his “For Children” played on the piano. But Bartók’s inspiration led him to a more ambitious project. With his friend Zoltán Kodály at his side, he traveled to remote regions of Eastern Europe, where he collected music and popular songs.  Bartók created a network of modes that gives students the opportunity to have fun learning while focusing on progressive and irregular rhythmic parts, double strings, syncopation and percussive effects. The piece is a catalogue of changing atmospheres that seduces musicians far beyond their initial pedagogical aspect. Enrico Onofri and Lina Tur Bonet thought of the duos as a unique 45-minute cycle and exploration of Bartók’s world. They use highly reverberant acoustics and show their “historically informed” abilities to play precise articulations as well as each note’s dynamics. On this recording, they used strings from the early 1900’s mixing bare gut (A and B), metal-wound gut (G), and steel (E), a mixture which creates a pure and precise sound. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 1, 2013 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released July 31, 2015 | Pan Classics

Booklet
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Classical - Released September 2, 2014 | Pan Classics

Booklet
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Classical - Released November 9, 2009 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Despite the elite circle of friends and colleagues -- which included Corelli, Valentini, Scarlatti, Locatelli, and even Handel -- that surrounded Giovanni Mossi, his fame as a composer did not last much beyond his 1742 death. As a violinist himself, it was only natural that his first published set of works would be a set of six sonatas for violin with cello and harpsichord. The influence of Corelli on Mossi's works is clear, yet Mossi branched out from the more rigid movement structure used by Corelli and did more to explore neighboring tonal areas. Performing these six charming works is Baroque violinist Leila Schayegh joined by violinist Ilze Grudele and harpsichordist Jörg Halobek. Schayegh's tone is sweet and clear, her intonation is precise, and her dynamics do a nice job shaping the musical lines. Perhaps the most interesting aspect of her performance, as detailed in her liner notes, would be her choices regarding ornamentation, which are applied organically and brilliantly throughout the album. Recorded sound quality is pleasant, with a nice balance between the three instruments, and doesn't unduly favor the violin line. Despite all of these positive attributes, Schayegh's still feels a bit safe and minimally enthusiastic. Fans of music from this era will still find this an appealing addition to their collections. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 17, 2017 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik