Your basket is empty

Categories :

Albums

CD$9.99

Chamber Music - Released February 17, 2017 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
CD$9.99

Violin Concertos - Released March 26, 2007 | Pan Classics

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 9 de Répertoire
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Classical - Released July 3, 2012 | Pan Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason découverte - Hi-Res Audio
CD$9.99

Classical - Released January 29, 2016 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
CD$9.99

Classical - Released March 26, 2007 | Pan Classics

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 10 de Répertoire
CD$9.99

Chamber Music - Released June 21, 2019 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
CD$9.99

Duets - Released April 5, 2019 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Enrico Onofri discovered Bartók’s pedagogical piece 44 Duets for two cellos while he was studying in Italy under Hungarian master violinist Sándor Végh. Onofri took his time to prepare his project and looked for the ideal partner. When he met Lina Tur Bonet, then, he knew he had found her. Both violinists come from a baroque background and they both love Bartók.  Bartók composed the piece in 1931 following the suggestion of a German professor who needed a cycle for two violins without accompaniment. The initial agreement called for the rearrangement of his “For Children” played on the piano. But Bartók’s inspiration led him to a more ambitious project. With his friend Zoltán Kodály at his side, he traveled to remote regions of Eastern Europe, where he collected music and popular songs.  Bartók created a network of modes that gives students the opportunity to have fun learning while focusing on progressive and irregular rhythmic parts, double strings, syncopation and percussive effects. The piece is a catalogue of changing atmospheres that seduces musicians far beyond their initial pedagogical aspect. Enrico Onofri and Lina Tur Bonet thought of the duos as a unique 45-minute cycle and exploration of Bartók’s world. They use highly reverberant acoustics and show their “historically informed” abilities to play precise articulations as well as each note’s dynamics. On this recording, they used strings from the early 1900’s mixing bare gut (A and B), metal-wound gut (G), and steel (E), a mixture which creates a pure and precise sound. © François Hudry/Qobuz
CD$9.99

Classical - Released October 1, 2013 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
CD$9.99

Classical - Released November 9, 2009 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Despite the elite circle of friends and colleagues -- which included Corelli, Valentini, Scarlatti, Locatelli, and even Handel -- that surrounded Giovanni Mossi, his fame as a composer did not last much beyond his 1742 death. As a violinist himself, it was only natural that his first published set of works would be a set of six sonatas for violin with cello and harpsichord. The influence of Corelli on Mossi's works is clear, yet Mossi branched out from the more rigid movement structure used by Corelli and did more to explore neighboring tonal areas. Performing these six charming works is Baroque violinist Leila Schayegh joined by violinist Ilze Grudele and harpsichordist Jörg Halobek. Schayegh's tone is sweet and clear, her intonation is precise, and her dynamics do a nice job shaping the musical lines. Perhaps the most interesting aspect of her performance, as detailed in her liner notes, would be her choices regarding ornamentation, which are applied organically and brilliantly throughout the album. Recorded sound quality is pleasant, with a nice balance between the three instruments, and doesn't unduly favor the violin line. Despite all of these positive attributes, Schayegh's still feels a bit safe and minimally enthusiastic. Fans of music from this era will still find this an appealing addition to their collections. © TiVo
CD$9.99

Chamber Music - Released January 1, 2013 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
CD$9.99

Chamber Music - Released March 2, 2018 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
CD$9.99

Classical - Released November 17, 2017 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Well on time for St Cecilia’s Day on 22 November, Pan classics presents a new recording of the impressive ode composed by Handel. The fine Basel-based orchestra Musica Fiorita, conducted by Daniela Dolci, performs this well-known work with their trademark historically informed knowledge and elegance, perfectly translating Handel’s intentions in terms of underlining the text with very intentional use of musical affects. The Ode for St Cecilia’s Day is joined by the Concerto grosso op. 6 no. 4, a further ocassion to appreciate the ensemble’s fine playing. © Pan Classics
CD$9.99

Classical - Released March 1, 2011 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
CD$9.99

Chamber Music - Released March 4, 2014 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
CD$9.99

Classical - Released October 6, 2011 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
CD$9.99

Classical - Released July 5, 2011 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
CD$9.99

Classical - Released October 7, 2014 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
CD$9.99

Chamber Music - Released September 30, 2016 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
CD$9.99

Classical - Released January 3, 2012 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
CD$9.99

Masses, Passions, Requiems - Released March 23, 2018 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Every single note of this astounding mass of the Holy Virgin from Ghiselin Danckerts (1510-1567) is from the hand of the composer. The remark is by no means trivial, because at the time a good part of the Gregorian repertoire was the subject of thousands of improvisations, unannotated by definition. Yet, Danckerts annotated them, with a luxury of details, so we know precisely what the choirs and the soloists were singing and what they were improvising on the Gregorian sections of his mass (the introit, the hallelujah,…), a great rarity then, all the more so that the composer doesn’t hesitate to reproduce a few singular dissonances coming from implacable melodic logics. He is incidentally known for a few writings in which he clarifies with exactitude the art and the way to sing the sharp notes and the flat notes, to unfold the melisma, etc. Naturally, the polyphonic acts themselves (Kyrie, Credo, etc.) are also the subject of an extravagant harmonic and melodic profusion. It is hard to believe that this music is almost already half a millennium old. Danckerts was accepted as a singer in the papal chapel in 1538 and only left in 1565, not exactly his own choosing since according to his firing letter, he was accused of not having a voice anymore, to indulge in the pleasures with women, to be insanely rich and to be too sick to continue. Well, he wasn’t completely abandoned by the Church since, despite being a vile sinner, he kept on receiving his salary until his death two years later. The magnificent ensemble Cantar Lontano recorded this wonder in the captivating acoustics of two Italian baroque churches, in Pesaro and Castelbellino, neither too resounding nor too dry. © SM/Qobuz