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Full Operas - Released June 28, 2007 | Pan Classics

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 10 de Classica-Répertoire - 4 étoiles Classica
Francesco Cavalli (1602-1676) was a worthy successor to Monteverdi on the Venetian musical scene, and while his operas may not sustain the level of exalted musical inspiration and psychological depth of Monteverdi's, they come close enough to fully deserve the recognition they are beginning to receive. Like Monteverdi, Cavalli was a master dramatist, and his operas bristle with theatrical energy and vivid musical characterizations. L'Ormindo (1644), the first of his operas to be rediscovered (by Raymond Leppard, who conducted it at Glyndebourne in 1967), was written just two years after L'incoronazione di Poppea, and shares some of its attributes, most notably a remarkably expressive use of recitative, intriguing characters, and a dramatically arresting intermingling of comic and serious elements. The plot, unlike Monteverdi's clear and compact narrative, involves the complexity of mistaken identities, convoluted relationships, and improbable resolutions that would come to characterize later Baroque opera. The characters, however, are emotionally believable, for the most part, and are dramatically engaging, making it easier to overlook the absurdity of the plot. L'Ormindo receives a splendid performance by the French ensemble Les Paladins, conducted by Jérôme Correas. Correas' flexibility allows the singers to deliver the recitatives with convincing naturalism, but he never lets the musical momentum sag. There's not a weak link among the large cast, all of whom negotiate the early Baroque idiom as if it were second nature, and with persuasive dramatic vigor. The singers sound like a tight comedic troupe, and their interactions have a wonderful spontaneity. Pan's acoustic is clean and resonant, with excellent, natural-sounding balance. The performance would make an excellent introduction to the neglected world of early Baroque opera, and to Cavalli's genius as a dramatic composer. © TiVo
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Chamber Music - Released February 17, 2017 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Violin Concertos - Released March 26, 2007 | Pan Classics

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 9 de Répertoire
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Classical - Released July 3, 2012 | Pan Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason découverte - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released January 29, 2016 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
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Classical - Released March 26, 2007 | Pan Classics

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 10 de Répertoire
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Classical - Released October 4, 2011 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Chamber Music - Released September 25, 2015 | Pan Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Chamber Music - Released June 21, 2019 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Chamber Music - Released November 19, 2001 | Pan Classics

Distinctions Recommandé par Répertoire
In a time when national affiliation was necessarily written in stone, Henricus Albicastro was a genuine multi-national. Born in Bavaria to Swiss parents, Albicastro was what was then called a dilettante, not an unfocused dabbler but a musician whose day job was in another field, and in Albicastro's case that living was made astride a horse; he was a captain of the cavalry in the Dutch Republican Army in the War of the Spanish Succession. He also served as an orchestra leader at the University of Leiden in the 1680s, and as such, he is identified as "Viennensis Musicus adcademiae" in contemporary documents, suggesting his musical education occurred in Vienna. A tendency toward the use of oddball harmonic devices and especially florid violin writing indicates possible contact with the school of Biber and Muffat, but that element is miniscule compared to the influence of Arcangelo Corelli and the Italian model. Nevertheless, there are ways in which these concerti do not behave typically; there is an emphasis on tutti writing, and solo passages are sparingly used. Pan Classics' Henrico Albicastro: 12 concerti a Quattro Op. 7 is the first opus of Albicastro recorded complete and the first substantive program of Albicastro to appear on disc since 1990. It features two combined groups, Collegium Marianum and Collegium 1704, led by harpsichordist Václav Luks and featuring violin soloist Riccardo Masahide Minasi; both ensembles hail from Prague. This recording, in fact, was made in the Rudolfinum in Prague, but in 2000; it did not come out on Pan until 2007. Seven years is a heck of a long time for anything to sit in the can, so long that since then Minasi has left Collegium 1704 and joined Il Giardino Armonico. Admittedly, it is a good, though not great recording; the combined ensembles lack cohesion. Allegros tend to be a little wilted and underpowered; slow movements fare better. However, quite a bit of Albicastro's music is highly extraordinary; witness the fall sequences in the finale of the Concerto I in F, the proto-minimalistic texture of the movement marked Tremolo, Spiccato, Adagio in the Concerto III in C, and the sweet, pop-like harmonies in the oboe-driven Adagio of Concerto IV in C minor. Therefore, there is reason to want to seek out Pan Classics' Henrico Albicastro: 12 concerti a Quattro, Op. 7, especially if Baroque instrumental music is one's bag; hopefully this won't be the last we hear from the musical Cavalier of Leiden. © TiVo
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Duets - Released April 5, 2019 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Enrico Onofri discovered Bartók’s pedagogical piece 44 Duets for two cellos while he was studying in Italy under Hungarian master violinist Sándor Végh. Onofri took his time to prepare his project and looked for the ideal partner. When he met Lina Tur Bonet, then, he knew he had found her. Both violinists come from a baroque background and they both love Bartók.  Bartók composed the piece in 1931 following the suggestion of a German professor who needed a cycle for two violins without accompaniment. The initial agreement called for the rearrangement of his “For Children” played on the piano. But Bartók’s inspiration led him to a more ambitious project. With his friend Zoltán Kodály at his side, he traveled to remote regions of Eastern Europe, where he collected music and popular songs.  Bartók created a network of modes that gives students the opportunity to have fun learning while focusing on progressive and irregular rhythmic parts, double strings, syncopation and percussive effects. The piece is a catalogue of changing atmospheres that seduces musicians far beyond their initial pedagogical aspect. Enrico Onofri and Lina Tur Bonet thought of the duos as a unique 45-minute cycle and exploration of Bartók’s world. They use highly reverberant acoustics and show their “historically informed” abilities to play precise articulations as well as each note’s dynamics. On this recording, they used strings from the early 1900’s mixing bare gut (A and B), metal-wound gut (G), and steel (E), a mixture which creates a pure and precise sound. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 1, 2013 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released November 9, 2009 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Despite the elite circle of friends and colleagues -- which included Corelli, Valentini, Scarlatti, Locatelli, and even Handel -- that surrounded Giovanni Mossi, his fame as a composer did not last much beyond his 1742 death. As a violinist himself, it was only natural that his first published set of works would be a set of six sonatas for violin with cello and harpsichord. The influence of Corelli on Mossi's works is clear, yet Mossi branched out from the more rigid movement structure used by Corelli and did more to explore neighboring tonal areas. Performing these six charming works is Baroque violinist Leila Schayegh joined by violinist Ilze Grudele and harpsichordist Jörg Halobek. Schayegh's tone is sweet and clear, her intonation is precise, and her dynamics do a nice job shaping the musical lines. Perhaps the most interesting aspect of her performance, as detailed in her liner notes, would be her choices regarding ornamentation, which are applied organically and brilliantly throughout the album. Recorded sound quality is pleasant, with a nice balance between the three instruments, and doesn't unduly favor the violin line. Despite all of these positive attributes, Schayegh's still feels a bit safe and minimally enthusiastic. Fans of music from this era will still find this an appealing addition to their collections. © TiVo
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Chamber Music - Released January 1, 2013 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Chamber Music - Released March 2, 2018 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released November 17, 2017 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Well on time for St Cecilia’s Day on 22 November, Pan classics presents a new recording of the impressive ode composed by Handel. The fine Basel-based orchestra Musica Fiorita, conducted by Daniela Dolci, performs this well-known work with their trademark historically informed knowledge and elegance, perfectly translating Handel’s intentions in terms of underlining the text with very intentional use of musical affects. The Ode for St Cecilia’s Day is joined by the Concerto grosso op. 6 no. 4, a further ocassion to appreciate the ensemble’s fine playing. © Pan Classics
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Classical - Released February 7, 2012 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released March 1, 2011 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Chamber Music - Released March 4, 2014 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released October 6, 2011 | Pan Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason