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Jazz - Released April 2, 2021 | Outhere

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Jazz - Released April 10, 2020 | Outhere

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Jazz - Released September 28, 2018 | Outhere

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Jazz - Released January 26, 2018 | Outhere

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Jazz - Released January 26, 2018 | Outhere

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Classical - Released April 21, 2017 | Outhere

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Jazz - Released March 17, 2017 | Outhere

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Jazz - Released March 10, 2017 | Outhere

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World - Released June 24, 2016 | Outhere

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Jazz - Released June 17, 2016 | Outhere

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Jazz - Released October 16, 2015 | Outhere

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Jazz - Released May 11, 2015 | Outhere

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Jazz - Released November 3, 2014 | Outhere

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And now for something completely different! Words don't do it justice, but...what you have here are (mostly) familiar Baroque vocal pieces, sung by a Congolese countertenor, Serge Kakudji, and accompanied by a battery of Congolese percussion and electric guitar. The African players are from Kinshasa, and the music is mostly in the soukous style, derived partly from Latin American rumba. There are a couple of original pieces, and in live performance the music would be accompanied by dancers. Just to top it all off, there are some syllable vocal harmonies that sound as though they could have come off 1960s lounge recordings. When it comes to cross-cultural fusions, this is hard to outdo. The idea was apparently the brainchild not of Kakudji but of Belgian composer and jazz saxophonist Fabrizio Cassol, who has traveled extensively in Africa. Sometimes the Baroque pieces lie right on the surface, and sometime they're buried more deeply; you may enjoy playing a few for friends and seeing whether they can identify the source material. What makes this all so extraordinary is that there is absolutely nothing of pat pastiche about it, or even of experiment. The music sounds as though it's the most natural thing in the world, as though people had been mixing these elements for decades, and it has the kind of swing that comes only from true enjoyment on the part of the players. A real triumph. © James Manheim /TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Outhere

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Céline Frisch, the French harpsichordist who had previously turned in superlative recordings of Bach's Goldberg Variations and d'Anglebert's Pièces de clavecin, here delivers a sumptuous disc of Rameau's Pièces de clavecin. Of the three works on the program, one is the fairly traditional Suite in A minor from 1706 with its standard stylized dance forms, while the other two are the more mature Suite in E minor from 1724 and Suite in G minor from 1728 containing its more evocative pieces like Le Rappel des Oiseaux and Les Sauvages. But whatever the piece, Frisch brings a freshness, an originality, and a virtuosity that are positively bracing. There's color in her playing blended with wit and sensitivity, along with a sense of rhythm that carries all before it. Whether in the hearty Musette, the sublime L'Enharmonique, or even the silly Le Poule, Frisch finds the energy and affection that makes Rameau's music instantly appealing even for listeners who may not be fans of French Baroque harpsichord music. As previously, Alpha provides Frisch with sound that is the next best thing to being there. © TiVo
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Classical - Released September 30, 2003 | Outhere

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Classical - Released July 7, 2014 | Outhere

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Classical - Released July 7, 2014 | Outhere

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Alpha Productions' Jean-Marie Leclair: Le Tombeau features the chamber group Les Folies Françoises under the direction of violinist Patrick Cohën-Akenine in a chamber overture from Op. 13, three sonatas from Op. 5, and the Concerto in G minor, Op. 10/6, by the ill-fated Leclair. In the concerto, Les Folies Françoises is filled out into a small orchestra whimsically referred to as the Orchestre des Folies Françoises, an appellation that can be translated as "the orchestra of French madmen," although that is probably not what they had in mind. It is the concerto that comes off best here, although all of the playing on Jean-Marie Leclair: Le Tombeau is at least decent and very French in character. It just doesn't feel definitive in the way certain other Alpha Productions issues of Baroque music, such as Bruno Cocset's recording of Vivaldi's cello sonatas or Stylus Phantasticus' Philipp Heinrich Erlebach collection, easily achieve -- Jean-Marie Leclair: Le Tombeau isn't quite up to that standard. Patrick Cohën-Akenine is tangled up in his strings during the difficult double-stops that open the title track, Sonata VI in C minor, Op. 5/6 "Le Tombeau," and one is left to wonder why Cohën-Akenine decided not to retake this passage. However, none of these pieces has been recorded with any great depth, so Jean-Marie Leclair: Le Tombeau is still a welcome addition to Leclair's catalog, and a decent place to start if one wants to investigate the music of Leclair. The booklet comes with an Agatha Christie-styled exposition of the murder of Leclair, including profiles of the four main suspects, that is informative and highly entertaining to read. © TiVo
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Classical - Released May 15, 2008 | Outhere

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Is it possible to have too many recordings of Beethoven's clarinet trios? Only if one hates the clarinet's rich, warm tone; smooth, sweet action; and graceful agility. But for those listeners who recall that the clarinet was most composers' preferred woodwind instrument -- compare the deep beauty of Mozart's clarinet quintet with the shallow prettiness of his flute quartets -- the very idea of hating the clarinet is incomprehensible, and thus the idea of coupling Beethoven two clarinet trios is irresistible. And so it proves on this Fuga Libera disc by Ensemble Kheops. Featuring clarinetist Ronald van Spaendonck, cellist Marie Hallynck, and pianist Muhiddin Dürrüoglu, the Belgian group plays with an ease and naturalness that ideally suit the music. Beethoven's Clarinet Trios, Op. 11, written directly for the ensemble, and Opus 38, an arrangement by the composer of the Septet, Op. 20, were written to entertain, and their combination of instantly appealing melodies, affectionate harmonies, buoyant rhythms, and witty settings requires just the sort of effortless virtuosity and affectionate charm that the Ensemble Kheops brings to the music. Recorded in clear, natural sound by Fuga Libera, this disc will undoubtedly delight fans of the clarinet no matter how many recordings of these works they have. © TiVo
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Classical - Released September 1, 2007 | Outhere

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Classical - Released January 1, 1994 | Outhere

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