Categories :

Albums

CD$19.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | Ondine

Booklet
HI-RES$29.99
CD$19.99

Ballets - Released February 23, 2010 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
CD$19.99

Opera - Released April 1, 2010 | Ondine

Ondine's Essential Highlights of Karita Mattila brings together two previous releases, Karita Mattila Live in Helsinki from 2001 and Sibelius: Songs from 1996. Karita Mattila Live in Helsinki begins with riotous opening applause that continues through the orchestral introduction to "Dich teure Halle" from Tannhäuser, greeting Mattila like a rock star, and she performs with the passionate abandon and almost tangible audience rapport characteristic of rock stars. The intensity of her performance is palpable and she is fully invested in this material, holding nothing back. Besides the Wagner, Mattila brings characters from Dvorák, Verdi, and Puccini operas to life with a searing focus. Her powerful, radiant voice in the service of such an intelligent and heartfelt commitment to the music communicates viscerally with her audience. The remainder of the concert is devoted to lighter material, which she delivers with no less understanding and effectiveness. The comic gifts she brings to three arias from Die Fledermaus and her seductive performances of "Falling in Love Again," "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend," and "Summertime" show that she could have made a career as a chanteuse if she'd chosen not to pursue opera. There are a few ancillary noises and some applause, but generally the sound is terrifically clean and present. Mattila's large, focused, warmly expressive soprano is especially well-suited to the music of the Romantic and post-Romantic eras, so it seems natural that she would have an affinity for the songs of her countryman Jean Sibelius. The songs are especially attractive, harmonically lush and melodically gratifying, beautifully constructed, and written to show off the virtuosic possibilities of the voice. Many of them, such as "Fåfäng önskan" and "Svarta rosor," lie very high, but Mattila soars and floats through their punishing tessitura with apparent effortlessness. Her robust soprano is absolutely secure throughout the full extent of her range (as is especially evident in "Arioso"), and it sounds like an advertisement for superb vocal health and grounded technique. That health comes across in the exuberance of her interpretations and her ability to sing with an abandon that never threatens to veer out of control; she never sounds less than fully at ease. Pianist Ilmo Ranta supplies a supportive accompaniment. Ondine's sound is clear, clean, and vibrant. This album should delight Mattila's fans, as well as Sibelius enthusiasts, and anyone who appreciates luminous vocal performances.
CD$19.99

Classical - Released May 3, 2011 | Ondine

CD$19.99

Opera - Released January 1, 2014 | Ondine

HI-RES$29.99
CD$19.99

Chamber Music - Released March 4, 2014 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Hi-Res Audio
CD$19.99

Opera - Released May 6, 2014 | Ondine

Booklet
CD$19.99

Choral Music (Choirs) - Released March 10, 2015 | Ondine

Booklet
CD$19.99

Opera - Released April 14, 2015 | Ondine

Booklet
HI-RES$20.99$29.99(30%)
CD$13.99$19.99(30%)

Chamber Music - Released June 9, 2015 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet
HI-RES$20.99$29.99(30%)
CD$13.99$19.99(30%)

Violin Solos - Released September 8, 2017 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique - Choc de Classica - Exceptional Sound Recording - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Of course, since years Bach’s Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin have been recorded over and over again, including by world’s best and most prestigious solists. But when violinist Christian Tetzlaff releases a brand new recording, we can only say: “Friends, countrymen, lend Qobuz your ears”. Concerts with Christian Tetzlaff often become an existential experience for interpreter and audience alike; old familiar works suddenly appear in an entirely new light, also – of course – within the frame of a new studio recording such as this one. Essential to Tetzlaff’s approach are the courage to take risks, technical brilliance, openness and alertness to life. Such an interpretation becomes a real challenge for the aficionado and guarantees a brilliant musical adventure.
CD$19.99

Classical - Released January 12, 2018 | Ondine

Booklet
After the five-volume complete recording of Beethoven’s Piano Sonatas Paavali Jumppanen’s new recording on Ondine turns attention to Claude Debussy’s (1862–1918) piano works. This album includes complete Préludes together with the Children’s Corner. Debussy’s oeuvre has been explored both by the amateur pianist and the most legendary virtuosos of the keyboard. Throughout his career Debussy sought new ways to express his musical vistas. He began numerous large compositional projects and between these big ventures wrote miniatures such as songs and piano pieces. Fine examples of these are the Préludes and the Children’s Corner. Debussy’s 24 piano preludes were published in two sets in 1910 and 1913. These miniatures are varied in character and style, and include, among others, references to literature, poetry, nature, the Mediterranean landscape and the events in Paris during Debussy’s lifetime. This work resulted in the creation of such enigmatic pieces as La cathédrale engloutie, La fille aux cheveux de lin and Des pas sur la neige, to name but a few. The six pieces forming the cycle Children’s Corner (1908) evoke adult recollections of childhood. The set bears a dedication to Debussy’s daughter Chouchou and includes some of Debussy’s most well-known piano pieces, including The snow is dancing and Golliwogg’s Cake Walk. A dedicated performer of French music, Paavali Jumppanen often performs the large cycles of Debussy’s late period, namely the Préludes and the Études. About a Debussy recital, The Boston Globe reported how “Jumppanen maximized piano’s deeply resonant qualities—not just to create beautiful sound but to point up how radical Debussy’s harmonic language was.” Another critic (ConcertoNet.com) noted: ”I was bowled over by Mr. Jumppanen’s performance. - - As for his upcoming recording of the complete Debussy Preludes, sight-unseen, I would urge any collector to grab it: if it is anything like the Etudes we heard last Sunday, we are in for a treat!” New York Arts continued: “Magnificent recital. - - I cannot imagine a more penetrating, subtle, and beautiful traversal of Debussy’s final statement for the piano.” © Ondine
CD$19.99

Choral Music (Choirs) - Released April 13, 2018 | Ondine

Booklet
In addition to strictly liturgical music – often coloured by the later Protestant tradition – the only medieval music to have survived from the Nordic countries is the "cantios", often available in printed format, rather than as manuscripts. These pieces are associated with figures from the Swedish Christian tradition (and therefore Finnish, since Finland was apart of Sweden back then). They are sung in medieval Latin; the first publications appear to date from 1582, even if the music itself is two or three centuries older. In an era when the Nordic countries had just converted to Christianity, in particular just after the time of St Henry in the 1150s – before, the mythological divinities were called Ylijumala (the king of heaven), Akka his wife, Ukko the old man, Pæivæ the sun god, Panu the god of fire, and dozens of others in a jolly pantheon which rather recalled Valhalla, and indeed the pantheons of ancient Greece and Rome, with perhaps a little more in the way of woodland gods. Most of these medieval "cantios" were sung in unison as calls and responses, but also with two, three or four voices, as we hear on this album. Clearly, this album is one for lovers of medieval religious singing, although a few pieces come close to the Renaissance. The Finnish Radio Chamber Choir gives an exemplary rendition of these songs, as do the ensembles Cetus Noster (Latin for "our whale", Greco-Roman mythology, but there you go) and Köyhät ritarit ("lost bread", in Finnish). © SM/Qobuz
HI-RES$29.99
CD$19.99

Classical - Released June 8, 2018 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet
It's hard to believe that the editions by Frans Brüggen (1934-2014) of Bach's works for solo violin and solo cello, transcribed for solo recorder, are now forty years old. But it was in the 1970s that he undertook this remarkable work, and committed it to vinyl. Flautist Bolette Roed has taken a dive into the world of transcriptions – and we can't repeat this enough: the art of transcription, of re-writing, of re-arrangement, of recycling, of transposition, is an integral part of the baroque repertoire, and in particular of baroque itself! Roed has given us the complete recording of what Brüggen transcribed for recorder: eleven movements of the Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin (because not everything can reasonably be transcribed for recorder), and the first three suites initially written for cello. For the violin works, Roed has used a whole panoply of different flutes, so as to keep within Bach's original keys; and so she alternates between alto recorders,"fourth" flutes (that is, a flute in B-flat, the fourth in question being calculated from the standard recorder of the baroque era, in F), and a "fifth" flute (see above). These sounds are radically different from one another, of course, which is made quite clear in the recording. As for the Suites for Cello, these are played on a "voice flute", an instrument between tenor and alto, with some very deep low notes. But its range corresponds to the range of a soprano voice... It goes without saying that the move from violin (or cello) to the recorder gives the listener the impression of hearing brand-new works: but they are very much by the Cantor, note for note. © SM/Qobuz
CD$19.99

Classical - Released September 14, 2018 | Ondine

Booklet
HI-RES$29.99
CD$19.99

Classical - Released January 11, 2019 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik