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Musique vocale sacrée - Released June 14, 2019 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Concertos pour instruments à vent - Released April 12, 2019 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Symphonies - Released November 9, 2018 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Exceptional Sound Recording
What a curious and charming piece of work the First Symphony by Witold Lutosławski is! Written in 1947, it is still borrowing from Stravinski, Bartók, Prokofiev and clearly Roussel, and yet it display the composer's own personal ideas, and his flawless skill in orchestration. But he had not yet made the dodecaphonic style his own, nor the principle of randomness which would be found later in 1961's Jeux vénitiens (Venetian Games). In his case, randomness refers to musicians or groups of musicians having the freedom to play their different parts when they feel like it, or when the conductor gives them a cue. But for sure, this piece's formal framework is still constrained: every performance will shed a different light on it, but it is still the same work. The album finishes with the Fourth Symphony, the composer's last, written between 1988 and 1991, performed in 1993 with Lutosławski himself conducting before his death a few months later. In this work he makes a clear return to his harmonic and melodic ideas, which at times approach Mahler or Bartók, even though the discourse remains decidedly modern. The contrast between the First Symphony, Jeux vénitiens and the Fourth Symphony could not be more spectacular, and it gives a brilliant picture of the evolution of a musical genius who embraced a wide range of influences, constantly adapting them to his own style. © SM/Qobuz
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Musique chorale (pour chœur) - Released May 11, 2018 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
One doesn't often get a chance to hear Schumann's Vom Pagen und der Königstochter ("Of the Page and the King's Daughter") a score from 1852 in the form of an epic drama in four movements, for soloists, choir and orchestra. In it, the composer uses the form of a recitative with accompaniment which surely prefigures high Wagner in terms of the vocal and orchestral treatment. The album continues with another rarity, the Cantata BWV 105 by Bach as revised by Schumann, probably for a performance when he was the musical director at Düsseldorf. For sure, the "arrangement" is pretty modest – or, rather, non-existent – in the choral overture and the first recitative, with the first big surprise coming in for the first soprano air: instead of an oboe interweaving finely with the singing, Schumann plumped for... the clarinet! You'll love it or hate it. The following recitative, a sublime bass arioso, also unadulterated; the bass aria which follows uses a romantic horn instead of the corno da tirarsi stipulated by Bach, a fairly modest alteration; the final chorale is also untouched, up to and including the extraordinary "slowing-down" writing for strings, which is entirely Bach's. The main difference here has to do with the fact that the Helsinki Baroque Orchestra plays on instruments from Schumann's century and in keeping with Romantic attitudes – something which Bach's score can happily handle, precisely because this is one of his most "Romantic" cantatas. The album closes – as remarkable as it may seem – on a discographic world first for Schumann! It seems that the Adventlied Op. 71 was never recorded until this album was made. That being said, it's clear why singers and orchestras haven't been in a hurry to tackle this rather ethereal, bloodless score: a blind listen would rather give the impression that this is a nice try by a forgotten composer at putting out some sub-Schumann stuff. But at least the enthusiast can now boast of having heard a "lost" Schumann! © SM/Qobuz
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Concertos pour clavier - Released March 2, 2018 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
This is the final volume in a Beethoven concerto cycle by German pianist Lars Vogt that has been generally acclaimed for its freshness and detail. Vogt both plays and conducts the Royal Northern Sinfonia, of which he is music director, and the result has been interpretations in which pianist and orchestra achieve an unusual kind of sync. The results are spectacular in the Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op. 58, where Vogt eases into each movement, as it were, letting details accrete and add power. Sample the final movement, where the orchestra begins at a very low dynamic level, and Vogt weaves piano and orchestra together convincingly as the music proceeds. The first two movements open in circumspect ways but, as they develop, reveal Beethoven the virtuoso as Viennese audiences must have experienced him; note especially the curious clipped treatment of the second movement's orchestral theme, so different from the stomping giant favored by most conductors. The final diminished fifth comes out in sharp, chilling relief here. Vogt's approach is a bit less successful in the early Piano Concerto No. 2 in B flat major, Op. 19, where the syncopations ring and rock, but the basic Mozartian shapes of the themes are indistinct. Nevertheless, Vogt's Beethoven recordings are major statements, and this album is no exception.
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Duos - Released February 9, 2018 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Musique symphonique - Released February 9, 2018 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Exceptional Sound Recording
‘Travel’ and ‘journey’ are often appropriate metaphors for the music of the Estonian composer Erkki-Sven Tüür (b. 1959). The composer himself describes his viola concerto Illuminatio as a “pilgrimage towards eternal light”, and with his Symphony No. 8 he stresses the importance of a “constant sense of ‘being on the road’”. This says something essential about the dynamics, growth and development of his music. To take a broader view, Tüür’s entire career may be described as a journey: in the course of his professional life beginning in the 1980s, he has thoroughly revised and reformed his idiom and compositional precepts. His ambitious journey began in rock music while at the same time he was studying flute, percussion and composition at the Conservatory. Since 1992 he has been a freelance composer. In his early career, Tüür developed a ‘polystylistic’ approach that combined minimalist and tonal elements on the one hand, modernist features on the other, into an idiom where he juxtaposed elements from different and seemingly incompatible styles, seeking both contrasts and syntheses. In the early 2000s, he went through a transition that resulted in his new composition technique. Here, “the entire composition is encapsulated in a source code – a gene which, as it mutates and grows, connects the dots in the fabric of the whole work”. All the works on the present album are from this period. The core of Tüür’s output consists of extensive orchestral works (including nine symphonies and several concertos), chamber music and vocal works. Whereas the viola concerto can be compared to a journey, Whistles and Whispers from Uluru (2007) for recorder and chamber orchestra was inspired by a landscape and a sonority. The piece was written to a commission from the Australian Chamber Orchestra for recorder virtuoso Genevieve Lacey, who also plays on this album – several different recorders, from sopranino to bass. Some sonorities are enhanced by electronic means. When a composer has written nine symphonies, the genre is obviosuly very important for him. In the case of Tüür, the term ‘symphonic’ must be understood in a broad sense – not as a strict formal scheme, but rather as a uniquely shaped and independently formed structure in each work. Tüür’s symphonies form the hard core of his output, spanning the length of his career, the first dating from 1984 and the latest from 2017. The symphonies vary greatly in terms of form, ensemble and idiom. Symphony No. 8 was commissioned by the Scottish Chamber Orchestra and was completed in 2010. Considering the resources of the commissioning party, Tüür scored the work for a sinfonietta-type ensemble instead of a large symphony orchestra, and as a result the music has at times a chamber music feel. © SM/Qobuz
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Musique vocale (profane et sacrée) - Released November 10, 2017 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
The main attraction of this album is to present, in addition to a few already established recorded works such as Brahms’ Nänie, Gesang der Parzen (Song of the Fates) and Schicksalslied (Song of Destiny), the Liebeslieder Walzer in its orchestral version as imagined by the composer himself. Surprisingly while the versions for piano duet and vocal quartet have often been recorded, that is not the case for the nine waltzes selected by Brahms in 1870 for his orchestral rewriting; indeed they were only edited in the 1930s, most likely forgotten in favour of more marketable versions. Another relative rarity is the Begräbnisgesang (Burial Song) op. 13 for choir and wind, an instrumentation that made the work usable for outdoor celebrations. The excellent Eric Ericson Chamber Choir, funded in 1945 by the notorious choral conductor, accompanied by the Gävle Symphony Orchestra from Sweden perform these sumptuous pieces in a stunningly beautiful recording. © SM/Qobuz
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Concertos pour clavier - Released October 13, 2017 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classique - Released June 3, 2014 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica - Exceptional Sound Recording
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Musique de chambre - Released March 4, 2014 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Hi-Res Audio
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Musique chorale (pour chœur) - Released April 3, 2012 | Ondine

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica