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Children - To be released November 8, 2019 | Omnivore Recordings

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CD$12.99

Children - To be released November 8, 2019 | Omnivore Recordings

Booklet
CD$12.99

Children - To be released November 8, 2019 | Omnivore Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - To be released October 18, 2019 | Omnivore Recordings

Booklet
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Children - To be released October 4, 2019 | Omnivore Recordings

Booklet
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Classical - To be released October 4, 2019 | Omnivore Recordings

If jazzing something up means to make it more lively and more entertaining, then listeners who might run for their lives if the Mister Rogers' Neighborhood show came on might be convinced that a fine jazz pianist such as Johnny Costa could make exciting music out of the Fred Rogers songbook. But, of course, one great thing about jazz musicians is that they can improvise great music based on just about anything. And if one can get beyond prejudice against the host who constantly changes his sweater, there is indeed swinging piano trio jazz galore on this record. Costa is an old-school stylist whose fingers are big enough to suggest Art Tatum, but who seems to have become contemplative and spacy in the Red Garland mode, perhaps an influence from the Land of Make Believe. All kidding aside, the long collaboration between host and show pianist was a fruitful one, and this disc -- although obviously not the most well-known or popular part of the legacy -- will be of interest to fans of jazz piano. An interesting challenge to Costa was the decision to do such a large number of tunes, and to keep the versions in the two- to three-minute realm. Normally a jazz piano trio would play numbers about double this length. Costa has to find ways of getting his personal touch into tracks that are sometimes just extended theme statements. ~ Eugene Chadbourne
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Jazz - Released September 13, 2019 | Omnivore Recordings

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Saxophonist Art Pepper's career was in its final comeback phase in 1979 when he accepted producer John Snyder's invitation to record an album on his fledgling Artists House label. A West Coast jazz star in the '50s, Pepper had suffered from bouts with drug abuse and subsequent incarceration that left him largely marginalized by the '70s. However, after going through rehab and meeting his wife and manager Laurie Pepper, he enjoyed a fruitful late-career resurgence. It is that resurgent period that is showcased on Omnivore's superb 2019 anthology Promise Kept: The Complete Artists House Recordings. Produced by Laurie Pepper and Omnivore founder Cheryl Pawleski, Promise Kept brings together all of the tracks the saxophonist recorded for Artists House including for 1980's So in Love, The New York Album, Artworks, and Stardust, all of which were later released in the mid-'80s on Galaxy Records. Also included are over 20 previously unreleased takes culled from the original sessions. All of these tracks came out of separate 1979 sessions: one in New York with bassist Ron Carter, pianist Hank Jones, and drummer Al Foster, and several in Los Angeles with pianist George Cables, bassist Charlie Haden, and drummer Billy Higgins. Purportedly, there was some tension between Art and the New York guys in part due to tempo choices. Consequently, tracks like "Yesterday" and Pepper's own "Diane" off So in Love, have a nervous electricity that makes them compelling decades later. More relaxed are the West Coast tracks off So in Love, including "Blues for Blanche" and "Stardust," which find Pepper striking a balance between his classic West Coast lyricism and his late-career love of bluesy, Coltrane-influenced lines. The rest of the sessions follow accordingly as Pepper spars his way through nervy renditions of "A Night in Tunisia," "Straight, No Chaser," and his own "My Friend John" on the New York Album. Conversely, the Los Angeles dates that make up Artworks and Stardust are more relaxed, featuring buoyant takes of "Desafinado" and a rare clarinet performance of "Anthropology." There are also several solo tracks featured throughout the collection including fluid, bop-inflected takes on "Body and Soul" and "You Go to My Head" off Artworks, and a starkly soulful reading of "In a Mellow Tone" on the previously unreleased Sessions disc. As with much of Pepper's later work, the Artists House sessions are marked by his earthy lyricism and hardwon soulfulness; a sound borne out of his decades-long descent into drug addiction and a renewed desire to again prove his mettle alongside the jazz greats. Tragically, he died only three years after making these recordings, leaving Laurie Pepper to issue the bulk of these tracks posthumously. Promise Kept is a testament to their comeback achievement. ~ Matt Collar
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Classical - Released September 13, 2019 | Omnivore Recordings

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Country - Released September 13, 2019 | Omnivore Recordings

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Children - Released August 30, 2019 | Omnivore Recordings

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Children - Released August 30, 2019 | Omnivore Recordings

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Children - Released August 30, 2019 | Omnivore Recordings

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Children - Released August 30, 2019 | Omnivore Recordings

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Children - Released August 23, 2019 | Omnivore Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 23, 2019 | Omnivore Recordings

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Jazz - Released August 9, 2019 | Omnivore Recordings

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Country - Released August 2, 2019 | Omnivore Recordings

Booklet
Although Cindy Lee Berryhill's first two albums positioned her as a folky with some stray Patti Smith leanings, Cindy Lee Berryhill is, at heart, a closet Beach Boys fan. Her third album, Garage Orchestra, drops the folk-rock leanings of the first two records in favor of a singer/songwriter feel akin to early-'70s Beach Boys classics like Surf's Up and Holland, with Berryhill's guitar and piano ably supported by a much larger cast of musicians who color the tracks with vibes, strings, horns, and percussion. Berryhill's trilling voice and oddball lyrical preoccupations are the same, however; the quirky shaggy-dog story "Gary Handeman" and the incredibly odd "UFO Suite" are among Berryhill's funniest and strangest songs, while the Barenaked Ladies-like "I Want Stuff" and the gentle Brian Wilson homage "Song for Brian" cover the album's emotional poles. Much more solid than her first two records, both of which had some filler, Garage Orchestra is Berryhill's first completely solid and intriguing effort. ~ Stewart Mason
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Country - Released August 2, 2019 | Omnivore Recordings

Booklet
Berryhill is like the baseball pitcher who tosses fine games every fourth or fifth outing. If you happen to see one of those games, you'd have no idea why the pitcher couldn't perform like that all of the time. By the same token, if you only heard Berryhill's best tracks, you'd think she was a major singer-songwriter, or at least on the verge of becoming one. That's what happens here: when she cuts the schtick and just concentrates on the heart of the matter, as on "California" or "Unwritten Love Song" (her most soulful vocal ever), she sounds like a real contender. The rest of the time she doesn't sing or write as well, making one wish she could turn on the juice more, or at least focus on singing expressively instead of dropping into her comfortable talky mannerisms so often. ~ Richie Unterberger
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Country - Released July 12, 2019 | Omnivore Recordings

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Country - Released July 12, 2019 | Omnivore Recordings