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Classical - To be released November 15, 2019 | naïve classique

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Symphonic Music - Released November 8, 2019 | naïve classique

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Like the Brandenburg Concertos and other instrumental works of Johann Sebastian Bach, the four Orchestral Suites are available in mainstream and period versions, and listeners have a variety of valid interpretations to explore. This 2019 release by Rinaldo Alessandrini and Concerto Italiano definitely belongs to the period category, and fans of original instrumentation and researched historical practices will find this album not only true to Baroque style but also as robust and energetic as any performance on modern instruments. What sets this double-disc package from Naïve apart from other recordings of the suites (also called ouvertures) is the inclusion of comparable works by two of Bach's second cousins, the Ouverture in E minor of Johann Bernhard Bach and the Ouverture in G major of Johann Ludwig Bach, members of the extended family of composers who collectively made their surname a synonym for musician. Because these obscure pieces are positioned between the much more familiar suites of the master, it is clear that Alessandrini wants to draw special attention to them and to avoid any treatment of them as mere curiosities or footnotes. To be sure, Bach held both composers in high esteem, and regarded their music positively, as his performances and preservation of their scores confirm. Listeners might prefer to hear them first, in order to appreciate them with fresh ears, before venturing into the greater suites, which are gloriously rendered in resonant sound at the Pontifical Institute of Sacred Music, Rome.
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Classical - Released November 6, 2019 | naïve classique

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Symphonic Music - Released October 31, 2019 | naïve classique

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Classical - Released October 30, 2019 | naïve classique

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Classical - Released October 25, 2019 | naïve classique

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Symphonic Music - Released October 24, 2019 | naïve classique

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Classical - Released October 22, 2019 | naïve classique

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Classical - Released October 16, 2019 | naïve classique

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Classical - Released October 9, 2019 | naïve classique

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Classical - Released October 4, 2019 | naïve classique

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Christophe Coin continues his complete collection of the Vivaldi cello concertos. There are some  pieces on this new album which show the cello to be more of an ensemble instrument than a solo one. Working from the premise that the cello’s vocal-like tone was Vivaldi’s favourite thing about the instrument, Christophe Coin’s rendition puts this voice at the forefront of this score. Using a smaller, five-stringed cello which he plays upright on a small wooden table to increase its volume and resonance, as seen in some paintings, the cellist underlines how attentive Vivaldi was to vary his simple and repetitive lyricism using simple techniques that still manage to move both the artist and the audience: “A taught dissonance, a well-placed ornament, a well-chosen interval, just quick moments, he emphasises, bring excitement to the routine of our lives.” The Onda Armonica play in a rich continuo with three instruments used either simultaneously or alternately: the organ, the harpsichord and the theorbo, as well as a mandolin (an instrument Vivaldi also engaged with a lot) to liven up the Concerto in C major, RV 400. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 1, 2019 | naïve classique

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Classical - Released October 1, 2019 | naïve classique

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Classical - Released October 1, 2019 | naïve classique

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Classical - Released September 25, 2019 | naïve classique

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Classical - Released September 18, 2019 | naïve classique

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Classical - Released July 24, 2019 | naïve classique

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"In his darker works, one is abandoned at the depths of a dry well, far from any light, alone with ogres and demons, and just as Dowland goes to extremes in his textual allusions, in a like manner he will twist and turn the lutenist’s hands to wring the excruciating essence from the text. In another moment, he can elicit an almost ferocious capriciousness with as many colours as a rainbow where the lute, which was his instrument of torture a few minutes before, suddenly rises to unexpected heights of lightness and eloquent folly." It is in such passionate terms as these that lutist Hopkinson Smith describes the music that John Dowland selected for his instrument. This new album dedicated to his famous songs could seem sacrilegious to some aficionados. But the simple music-lover will find in it a source of unparalleled delight. Hopkinson Smith and Mariana Florès have changed the original text by transposing and altering some pages. Anticipating the indignation that such liberties might inspire, the performers point out, correctly, that in those days musical pragmatism was the spice of creativity. Dowland himself left behind several variants of his most famous works. Argentine soprano Mariana Florès threw herself into this project, both a labour of love and a departure for a performer who tends to sing in Romance languages. With the help of a coach, she has found the perfect English pronunciation, chiselling every syllable with care, working with her lutist friend to find the best colour for Dowland's language and music. It's this mixture of a firm vision and artistic freedom that gives this record such a uniquely enchanting tone. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released June 11, 2019 | naïve classique

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Classical - Released May 31, 2019 | naïve classique

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When it comes to posterity, Vivaldi has been quite lucky. Thanks to a series of happy accidents, his personal manuscript collection has survived through the centuries, allowing his music to be preserved and later played and recorded. Contralto Delphine Galou and Ottavio Dantone, the director of the Accademia Bizantina, drew from this invaluable batch of nearly 450 compositions to develop this album’s program of sacred music dedicated to the alto voice.This recording includes two “introdutioni” for alto, a kind of motet whose form would have been devised by Vivaldi for his Venetian work for the Pietà. You can also find the vespertine hymn Deus tuorum militum for alto and tenor (Alessandro Giangrande), as well as a Regina coeli, a Marian antiphon played on Easter Sunday.At the heart of this album is a violin concerto written for the day of the The Assumption of Mary (August 15th). The importance of this celebration in the Italian liturgical calendar is underlined here by a score of an unusual length for a Vivaldi concerto, with it being divided into two orchestral parts that exchange a sometimes and sometimes joyous dialogue. Written for his student Anna Maria, the solo violin part preserved in the archives is played here by Alessandro Tampieri, who has once again enriched it with a very virtuoso "capriccio" of his own making. © François Hudry/Qobuz

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