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Classical - To be released November 15, 2019 | Mirare

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Classical - To be released November 15, 2019 | Mirare

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Classical - To be released November 15, 2019 | Mirare

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Classical - Released November 8, 2019 | Mirare

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Classical - Released October 12, 2019 | Mirare

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Anna Karenina, the Tolstoy heroine who gave her name to the group recorded here, superbly embodies the torments and passion of the Russian people. Bohemia, Poland, Russia: the Trio Karénine traverses the territories of eastern Europe, their ardour, their lyricism, their tragedies. The Slavonic soul, exalted by Dvo?ák, Weinberg and Shostakovich, is the key to this programme. © Mirare
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Classical - Released September 13, 2019 | Mirare

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Since setting off in the early 2000s, Pierre Hantaï is still journeying into Domenico Scarlatti’s world. After a hiatus of more than ten years following the third volume, the harpsichordist finally recorded a fourth volume in 2016 and this autumn sees the sixth one come into bloom, once again superbly recorded in Haarlem in the Netherlands by Nicolas Bartholomée. Pierre Hantaï is taking his time to gradually construct a perfect anthology of Scarlatti’s keyboard work. Here, he explores some of his little-known sonatas. His keyboard intensifies the profound rhythmic force of Scarlatti’s world: the sharp lines burst forth, the harmonic tension constantly explodes, the new tones are revealed smoothly, and his playing – with an exhilarating left hand – is stunning throughout. The first five sonatas of this new release (all of which have a fairly fast tempo) form a representative ensemble of a rather uncompromising Scarlatti, followed by a moment of gravity and meditation with the exquisite Sonata in F minor, K. 69, while the surrounding Sonatas K. 502 and K. 43 (with a wonderfully volatile left hand) have clearly marked rhythms. The style and atmosphere changes with Sonata in C major, K. 384, whose tender “French” tone is emphasised by Pierre Hantaï, and at the same time there’s an almost modern feel which goes beyond even Soler’s most audacious scores. Fascinating! While the tender sonatas (K. 550, K. 544) distil an aftertaste that is slightly more spicy than the previous volumes, what continues to surprise us with Hantaï in this repertoire is his prolonged search for a “Hispanic” feel - a Spain in a majestic trance, with colliding rhythms and contrasting accents and registers. Let’s hope that Pierre Hantaï does not wait another ten years to deliver the seventh volume; there is no doubt that these Scarlatti recordings will remain one of the most exciting and necessary musical adventures of the 21st century. A perfectly captured sound, style and universe. © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
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Classical - Released May 3, 2019 | Mirare

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Classical - Released September 6, 2019 | Mirare

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Freeze frame. On the sleeve of his album Révolution, David Kadouch is seated at the piano, hands in the air, looking like a shadow puppet. He is trying to stop time. His project here – surprising from an artist who is not yet 35 – is modelled on Annie Ernaux and her tale The Years. It's about trying to gather together a collection of important moments, in this case musical, and in so doing, to take his own place in history. The works chosen by David Kadouch for this concept album are linked to spectacular collective events, but also to individual consequences. Alongside from Beethoven's famous Sonata No.26, Op.81a, called "Les Adieux", more jaunty and ornamented than powerful and angry; Étude révolutionnaire, Op.10 No.12 by Chopin, we find Dussek's Sufferings of the Queen of France. The pretext for a series of contrasting pages in the form of a mini-drama without words, this work, whose elegance perhaps recalls that of Marie-Antoinette, ends in a treatment of her final moments. But too much grandiloquence stifles the tragic. The pianist, who seems at first to have mistaken virtuosity for a feel for the tribulations of History, is more convincing in the second part of his programme with Sonata 1.X.1905 by Janacek, and Debussy's Les Soirs illuminés par l’ardeur du charbon and Feux d’artifice and finally Winnsboro Cotton Mill Blues by Rzewski, an infernal toccata that bends towards the blues. It's clear that these works prefer evocative, affecting treatment, and their more intimate discourse is a better suit for the initial aims of Révolution. © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
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Duets - Released August 30, 2019 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique
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Classical - Released July 12, 2019 | Mirare

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Solo Piano - Released May 17, 2019 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Classical - Released May 3, 2019 | Mirare

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Duets - Released April 26, 2019 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Sacred Oratorios - Released March 29, 2019 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
Composed by Dietrich Buxtehude in 1680 for the church of Lübeck, where he had been working for ten years, Membra Jesu Nostri describes the scars of the Passion of Christ through a cycle of seven cantatas. The work owes its title to a Latin manuscript written by a relative of Saint Bernard. Typical of the pietism of 17th century Lutheran Germany, the piece is a descent into the darkness of suffering and an ode to the promise of consolation. Grounded in rhetoric, Buxtehude’s music influenced a generation of innovative musicians. It would later be an inspiration to Johann Sebastian Bach, who traveled to Lübeck specifically to meet Buxtehude. Membra Jesus Nostri was written for a five-voice ensemble. It requires a set of soloists with three lower voices and two upper parts, as well as a subtle instrumental accompaniment featuring two violins, five viols, and one basso continuo chose by the musicians. Some authors have seen the influence of the “Versailles Motet,” which Buxtehude knew well, in this setup. The influence of Italian music, especially Monteverdi, which he may have known through his interest in Schütz’s music, is also clear. The work is the testimony to Buxtehude’s incredibly expressive power and deserves to be considered as a masterpiece among other spiritual compositions such as Schütz’s Musikalische Exequien, Bach’s Passions and, on an instrumental level, Biber’s Sonates du Rosaire.According to Philippe Pierlot, who can be heard on the record, “Buxtehude is appealing directly to our senses and making us experience the suffering of Christ. We can feel the wounds, the blows, and the heart when it ceases to beat. Thanks to the genius of his music, the composer not only moves his listener to intense emotion, but also enlightens him, giving him access to the deep meaning of the text it sings” © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released March 8, 2019 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Classical - Released March 1, 2019 | Mirare

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Classical - Released February 1, 2019 | Mirare

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Classical - Released January 25, 2019 | Mirare

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Classical - Released January 25, 2019 | Mirare

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Classical - Released January 25, 2019 | Mirare

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