Categories :

Albums

HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Alternative & Indie - To be released September 18, 2020 | Mascot Records

Hi-Res
HI-RES$7.49
CD$6.49

Rock - To be released August 21, 2020 | Mascot Records

Hi-Res
HI-RES$1.99
CD$1.49

Rock - Released July 9, 2020 | Mascot Records

Hi-Res
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Metal - Released May 29, 2020 | Mascot Records

Hi-Res
CD$12.99

Metal - Released May 29, 2020 | Mascot Records

HI-RES$1.99
CD$1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released May 15, 2020 | Mascot Records

Hi-Res
HI-RES$1.99
CD$1.49

Rock - Released April 24, 2020 | Mascot Records

Hi-Res
CD$12.99

Metal - Released January 31, 2020 | Mascot Records

Certain bands aren't huge names in their genre or style but nonetheless inspire smiles from those who are aware of them; Heathen are such a band. Heathen aren't as well known as Testament or Exodus, two other combos that came out of the Bay Area thrash scene of the '80s. But the moshers who are hip to Heathen are quick to give them props, and The Evolution of Chaos gives those moshers no reason to think any less of them. This early-2010 release is Heathen's first full-length album of new studio recordings since 1991's Victims of Deception; Heathen's 2004 release Recovered contained several new recordings (mostly covers) along with four previously unreleased 1991 demos for what was supposed to be the Opiate of the Masses EP. The Evolution of Chaos is a solid outing that finds Heathen's 2010 lineup -- David White on lead vocals, Lee Altus and Kragen Lum on guitar, Jon Torres on bass, and Darren Minter on drums -- combining high-speed thrashiness with epic power metal tendencies. Power metal, of course, was always a major influence on thrash, which owes a huge artistic debt to both power metal and punk. Epic hooks and choruses are things that thrash usually doesn't borrow from power metal, but there is no overlooking just how epic things get on "Red Tears of Disgrace," "Undone," "A Hero's Welcome," and other tracks. And as blistering as The Evolution of Chaos becomes at times, Heathen are appealingly melodic through the 68-minute CD; this is an album that values nuance as well as intensity and caffeinated aggression. Headbangers who hold thrash metal and power metal in equally high regard should have no problem getting into The Evolution of Chaos. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
HI-RES$1.99
CD$1.49

Metal - Released January 30, 2020 | Mascot Records

Hi-Res
CD$12.99

Rock - Released January 10, 2020 | Mascot Records

CD$1.49

Metal - Released January 7, 2020 | Mascot Records

HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Metal - Released November 15, 2019 | Mascot Records

Hi-Res
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Metal - Released November 8, 2019 | Mascot Records

Hi-Res
HI-RES$8.99
CD$7.99

Blues - Released November 1, 2019 | Mascot Records

Hi-Res
The approval rating for Black Stone Cherry's rootsy covers EP Back to Blues in 2017 was high enough to warrant the Kentucky rockers giving it another try. Like its predecessor, the 25-plus-minute EP contains six reimagined blues standards. Playing these tunes are de rigueur repertoire for blues musicians; so here, the contrast in interpretation is a paramount guideline for evaluation. The opener is a case in point. Freddie King's "Big Legged Woman" is delivered with guest Yates McKendree's upright piano vamps creating a bridge to the past. The rest, however, is rave-up maximalism: Chris Robertson's snarling, overdriven wail above the electric guitar riffs and snare breaks as the rhythm section fiercely punches up the backdrop. Robert Johnson's "Me & the Devil Blues" sounds like it could have been done by Delbert McClinton during the late '70s. It's greasy and funky with McKendree's clavinet driving the band as John Fred Young's busy drumming gets frontloaded with hard-grooving breaks. Robertson's delivery is gritty and soulful. The real highlight, however is the cover of Otis Rush's "All Your Love (I Miss Love)." Its shuffle and shimmy are informed by Fleetwood Mac's original version of "Black Magic Woman," with spiky, swampy, dialoguing lead guitars that break into a I-IV-V stomp midway through. Howlin Wolf's "Down in the Bottom" is offered in double time and heavily informed by Cream's version of "Crossroads Blues," with a burning Hammond B-3 providing a punchy yet snaky vamp. Elmore James' "Early One Morning" is, in its opening moments, a seemingly faithful read of the original before it breaks down into boogie-fied Southern funk & roll. Young's popping breaks work in and around the pocket as Wells' and Robertson's guitars muscularly slice and dice above Jon Lawhon's bumping bassline before the swampy, all-out boogie returns after the bridge. The closer is a provocative reading of Son House's "Death Letter Blues." This arrangement, far from the haunted, pathos-laden original with acoustic guitar and vocals, is a grinding rocker led by spiky harmonica and Robertson's testifying vocal. Its mood is at once defiant and mortified as Wells cranks up his six-string and lets fly with some of the most biting work he's ever put on a record, with a dropout bridge led by McKendree's popping boogie woogie piano framing a metallic guitar vamp. Fans should gravitate toward the material on Back to Blues, Vol. 2 as a stopgap between Black Stone Cherry albums. These tracks are all firmly imprinted with the band's swaggering sonic signature: It's delivered raw, loud, proud, and stomping, with precious little dynamic variation. In short, it rocks. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Hard Rock - Released August 23, 2019 | Mascot Records

Hi-Res
CD$1.49

Rock - Released July 19, 2019 | Mascot Records

CD$12.99

Rock - Released June 14, 2019 | Mascot Records

CD$1.49

Rock - Released May 17, 2019 | Mascot Records

HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Metal - Released April 26, 2019 | Mascot Records

Hi-Res
CD$1.49

Country - Released April 19, 2019 | Mascot Records