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Country - Released September 6, 2019 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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The country supergroup of Maren Morris, Brandi Carlile, Amanda Shires and Natalie Hemby—the Highwomen—mercifully isn't about girl power. Theirs is a show of strength by four grown-ass women and their mighty voices. They harmonize like nobody's business (the '80s-tinged "Redesigning Women," rodeo-sweetheart track "Heaven Is a Honky Tonk") but it's just as fun when they trade verses, as on the wickedly swinging "My Name Can't Be Mama" and lonesome-West title track, co-written with Jimmy Webb (who composed "Highwayman," made famous by Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson and Kris Kristofferson, who adopted the moniker in 1985 for their quartet). Morris takes center stage for "Loose Change," highlighting her clever-metaphor lyrics: "I'm gonna be somebody's lucky penny someday / instead of rolling around your pocket like loose change." Carlile exudes star power for the excellent "Wheels of Laredo" and "If She Ever Leaves Me"—a claim-staking weepie told from a lesbian POV. While not as famous, Shires ("Don't Call Me," a real spitfire) and Hemby (the Anne Murray-esque "My Only Child") prove much more than supporting players. And when all four voices come together with no solo turns for the angelic "Crowded Table," it's truly a high. © Qobuz
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Country - Released February 16, 2018 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Brandi Carlile does not lay idle. Between her new life as a homosexual mother which she openly displays or her activism with the association War Child, she has found time to return to the studio for the sixth time. As a mother, the hallucination of an America at the edge of cracking infused the story of what she considers the most intense of her career. By The Way, I Forgive You, entwined by the evangelical theme of forgiveness, co-produced by Shooter Jennings (the son of the late Waylon) and Dave Cobb (Jason Isbell, Chris Stapleton and Lori McKenna) succeeds the country folk of The Firewatcher's Daughter (2015). Ten tracks totalling 43 minutes, touching on topics such as Carlile's family, politics, identity and the faithful twin Hanseroth (Fightings Machinists). The strings were arranged by the late Paul Buckmaster (Elton John, David Bowie, Rolling Stone or Leonard Cohen) and its all packed into an emotional style of country made for a broad audience. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Country - Released July 17, 2020 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Country - Released May 11, 2018 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Country - Released September 13, 2019 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Country - Released January 12, 2018 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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This seems like a crucial moment for Anderson East. With Encore, the artist born in Alabama leaves the keys of the production to the excellent Dave Cobb and entrusts the writing of some titles to experts such as Chris Stapleton (King For A Day and If You Keep Leaving Me) and Ed Sheeran (All on My Mind). His Southern roots solidly surface in his blend of country and soul music (If You Keep Leaving Me will make you think of Otis Redding) or blues (Somebody Pick Up My Pieces). At the heart of this fusion of classic American music, Anderson East even slips covers of Ted Hawkins (Sorry You're Sick) and Willie Nelson (Somebody Pick Up My Pieces). With a perfect balance between vintage country soul sonorities and a still very contemporary approach, Encore is an endearing mainstream disc. It’s a work that most of all proves that his music is there to last. And what a voice he has too! © CM/Qobuz
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Country - Released March 18, 2016 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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More than a concept album, Dave Cobb's 2016 compilation Southern Family is a clarion call: the definition of a new south for a new millennium. This new south -- one with a reverence for the past, as defined by old tunes and handed-down traditions, but one unbeholden to conventions -- has been essayed by Cobb on his productions for Jamey Johnson, Chris Stapleton, and Sturgill Simpson, records that refurbish outlaw country for a new century. Outlaw itself looked toward the past, stripping back Nashville productions to their bare, burly bones, but Cobb's sensibility goes slightly further, treating that intersection of country tradition and rock modernism as ground zero. On the acclaimed albums by Johnson, Stapleton, and Simpson, this manifests in an easy swagger, but Southern Family is understated, a series of vignettes that combine to form an Americana mosaic. Much of the record plays like quiet confessions -- songs that feel whispered as much as sung -- but it's impossible to convey the south without tapping into the deep reservoirs of soul, blues, and gospel, sounds that give the album an underpinning of earthiness. It takes a while for those tunes to get there, though. Southern Family crawls into focus with John Paul White's "Simple Song" and Jason Isbell's "God Is a Working Man," tunes that function as keynotes for the album. The album is devised of nothing but songs that seem simple but are slyly layered, something Isbell's tune makes plain: the clean lines camouflage how he plays and inverts conventions, turning the traditional fresh. It's a trick repeated throughout the album, usually done so subtly, the impact is felt more than recognized (an exception to the rule is a bluesy crawl through "You Are My Sunshine" by Morgane and Chris Stapleton). Certain themes are cycled through -- usually family, loss, and love, sometimes arriving in a tangled ball -- but what resonates on Southern Family is how each singer/songwriter is faithful to their own voice within the grander tapestry Cobb has devised. It's a trick that telegraphs just how rich and complex this modern Southern Family actually is. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released February 19, 2016 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Country - Released August 10, 2018 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

What future is there for you, if not music, when your parents are Waylon Jennings and Jessie Colter? For Shooter Jennings, it is a heavy legacy he carries with him – one that’s almost impossible to compete with. Like Hank Jr, this son of had to find his own musical identity. With his authentic character and a passion for guns, outlaws and good old Tennessee, Shooter Jennings represents contemporary Southern country rock. His first album in 2004 Put The O Back In Country , confirmed his love for George Jones. With his redneck look, his slightly nasal voice, his offbeat and imperfect albums, it's hard not to feel a certain tenderness for Waylon's son. For this eponymous album, this country-rock-electronica maniac pays homage to... Giorgio Moroder! Yes that’s right, the pope of disco himself. Supported by Dave Cobb, this is the most country album of Jennings’ career to date. An atmosphere that is only further confirmed on the tracks Rhinestone Eyes and Do You Love Texas?. © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
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Country - Released July 25, 2019 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Country - Released February 16, 2018 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

Brandi Carlile does not lay idle. Between her new life as a homosexual mother which she openly displays or her activism with the association War Child, she has found time to return to the studio for the sixth time. As a mother, the hallucination of an America at the edge of cracking infused the story of what she considers the most intense of her career. By The Way, I Forgive You, entwined by the evangelical theme of forgiveness, co-produced by Shooter Jennings (the son of the late Waylon) and Dave Cobb (Jason Isbell, Chris Stapleton and Lori McKenna) succeeds the country folk of The Firewatcher's Daughter (2015). Ten tracks totalling 43 minutes, touching on topics such as Carlile's family, politics, identity and the faithful twin Hanseroth (Fightings Machinists). The strings were arranged by the late Paul Buckmaster (Elton John, David Bowie, Rolling Stone or Leonard Cohen) and its all packed into an emotional style of country made for a broad audience. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Country - Released May 11, 2018 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Country - Released March 4, 2016 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Country - Released January 10, 2020 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Country - Released March 18, 2016 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Country - Released August 13, 2019 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Country - Released July 19, 2019 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Country - Released October 11, 2019 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Country - Released January 15, 2016 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Country - Released August 3, 2018 | Low Country Sound - Elektra