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Electronic - Released May 13, 2020 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Released March 15, 2019 | Little Idiot

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Film Soundtracks - Released July 22, 2016 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Released February 26, 2016 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Released November 6, 2015 | Little Idiot

Ever since "The Girl and the Robot," it's been clear that Röyksopp and Robyn bring out the best in each other in a way that stands apart from each act's other collaborations: Torbjørn Brundtland and Svein Berge help ground her flights of fancy, while she enlivens their sophistication. Released shortly before their mid-2014 joint tour, Do It Again makes the most of their partnership. The trio bookends the EP with two of the most introspective tracks to ever grace a Robyn-affiliated project. "Monument" begins things with the singer in a strikingly reflective mood, sighing "When the moment comes, I can say I did it all with love" as Brundtland and Berge craft an expansive, elegant atmosphere that continues on "Inside the Idle Hour Club," a somber expanse of looping synths and brass just barely pinned down by a hypnotic house beat. This low-key side is even more pronounced compared to Robyn's vibrant Body Talk era (Röyksopp's subdued album Senior is probably a more valid touchstone), but the EP's sugary pop center provides a welcome balance. The standout "Sayit," which features Robyn duetting with an amorous Speak & Spell over an increasingly frenetic, and kinetic, beat, takes Do It Again's sleek aesthetic in a more danceable direction and winks at "The Girl and the Robot"'s titular concept. The title track is another highlight, serving up the kind of complex feelings and sparkling dance-pop that are Robyn's trademarks as she contemplates resuming an on-again, off-again relationship. Fortunately, Do It Again is a much happier reunion of collaborators with perfectly matched strengths. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Electronic - Released June 30, 2012 | Little Idiot

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Dance - Released May 17, 2010 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Released November 16, 2009 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Released November 2, 2009 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Released September 14, 2009 | Little Idiot

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 29, 2009 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Released June 29, 2009 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Released June 22, 2009 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Released May 11, 2009 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Released November 3, 2008 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Released June 2, 2008 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Released March 13, 2008 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Released March 5, 2007 | Little Idiot

Go: The Very Best of Moby is not the career-spanning compilation implied by its title. Instead, it's based around 1999's Play, 2002's 18, and 2005's Hotel, and it adds a handful of tracks in an attempt to entice fans who couldn't otherwise justify the purchase of a disc that relies on very recent and readily available material. (Hotel had only been out a year and a half when Go was released.) With the exception of Everything Is Wrong's ambient epic "God Moving Over the Face of the Waters," Anders Trentemøller's fresh mix of "Go," and a rough-sounding live version of "Feeling So Real," nothing here references Moby's output prior to Play. The one new track, "New York, New York," is a fun Giorgio Moroder-inspired throwaway featuring Debbie Harry. A bonus disc compiles 11 remixes, most of which will be mere curiosities to the average person with an interest in the first disc. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Electronic - Released November 6, 2006 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Released March 14, 2005 | Little Idiot

Hotel rarely shows, in any shape or form, traceable inspiration from the new wave and post-punk era Moby advertised as being in full effect. More surprising is that apart from the lovely ambient instrumentals that open and close it, the album is all valley and no peaks, suggesting that the shelving of his sampling device was the worst creative move he could've made. The first half contains simple -- as in basic and/or emaciated, so we're talking poor -- modern rock songs that tend to be anthemic and soul-searching in nature. Lead single "Beautiful" is one exception, a tongue-in-cheek thing Moby has imagined being sung by vacant celebrity couples. No matter how affable, vegan, liberal, bespectacled, or vertically challenged he is, the real irony is that a millionaire and former love interest of Natalie Portman has made a song of this kind (see also: Aerosmith's "Eat the Rich"). Beginning "C'mon bay-beh, c'mon girl, c'mon bay-beh, c'mon girl, I love you bay-beigh, I love you now, I love you bay-beigh, I love you now," the heart of the song doesn't say much more, and some of the guitar jerks are a lot closer to Eddie Money's "Shakin'" than anything related to Joy Division. And, speaking of Joy Division, a very gentle version of New Order's "Temptation" is the album's deepest connection to post-punk; it's telling that Moby opted to leave the vocals to Laura Dawn, since he's less a singer than Bernard Sumner. This begins the non-rock portion of the program, which fans of Play and 18 might find easier to enjoy, but it's not much better than what precedes it. For instance, does anybody need to hear him volley obvious bedroom come-ons with Dawn, as he does on "I Like It"? (Because it's about as appealing as a phrase like "Woody Allen nude scene.") Hotel's saving grace is a bonus disc containing an hour's worth of ambient techno that's good enough for separate release. You could name the two discs after Moby's fellow bald artists, which would tell anyone what they need to know before proceeding. Disc one: "Live's Ed Kowalczyk"; disc two: Brian Eno. © Andy Kellman /TiVo